Florence Bascom Geoscience Center

Hazards

These projects provide geologic information important to understanding hazards such as flooding, landslides, earthquakes, and sinkholes. Every year in the United States, natural hazard events threaten lives and livelihoods, resulting in deaths and billions of dollars in damage. Our projects work with many partners to monitor, assess, and conduct targeted research on natural hazards so that policymakers and the public have the understanding they need to enhance preparedness, response, and resilience.

Filter Total Items: 4
Date published: June 4, 2019
Status: Active

Appalachian Basin Geologic Mapping Project

The Appalachian Basin Geologic Mapping Project performs geologic mapping at local and regional scales, and geologic research in The Valley and Ridge and Appalachian Plateaus physiographic provinces. These provinces include parts of 11 states and mainly borders the Blue Ridge / Piedmont and North Interior Lowlands Provinces. Two states have Valley and Ridge geology only (GA, NJ), two have...

Date published: March 28, 2019
Status: Active

Sea Level and Storm Hazards: Past and Present

Sea level and Storm Hazards: Past and Present is a multidisciplinary study of past changes in sea level. Prehistoric shorelines can be used as a baseline for current and future sea level changes under warmer-than-present climate. Emphasis is placed on looking at sea levels during warm periods of the last 500,000 years as well as how base level changes increase the risk of coastal inundation...

Date published: September 11, 2018
Status: Active

Coastal Basement Geology of the Southeastern U.S. Project

This project, centered on South Carolina and Georgia, extends coastal-basement geologic mapping and related research south of a geologic map in production for pre-Cretaceous rocks beneath the Atlantic Coastal Plain from Virginia to southern New Jersey, and adds detail to a national-scale basement domain map constructed to delineate mineral-resource...

Date published: July 27, 2018
Status: Completed

Geologic Framework for Seismic Hazards in Central Virginia

The Central Virginia seismic zone (CVSZ) comprises an area of ~13,000 km2 in the central Virginia Piedmont; seismicity in this zone is relatively frequent, but generally mild in magnitude. The August 2011 event was the largest temblor recorded in the CVSZ since the development of modern seismic monitoring and highlighted how little we actually know about the CVSZ, including: 1) the...

Contacts: Mark W Carter