Fort Collins Science Center

Fish and Wildlife Disease

The United States is undergoing ecological change that is increasing the interface between wildlife, humans, and disease. Such changes are resulting in unpredictable shifts in the balances of disease cycles in natural hosts and humans, with consequences to many imperiled species. In addition to population declines, the loss of wildlife from disease contributes to a corresponding decline in ecosystem services that benefit human health and economies. TSH scientists collaborate with researchers and resource managers around the world to gain better scientific understanding of the ecological factors involved in the transmission and epidemiology of infectious diseases in wildlife, as well as contributing to the development of tools and techniques to help understand and manage disease in wildlife populations.

Filter Total Items: 18
Date published: September 23, 2020
Status: Active

Mapping Chronic Wasting Disease Management: Identify Opportunities for Intervention

This research effort is an interagency partnership between U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to model the social-ecological system that encompasses chronic wasting disease management in the United States. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal, neurologically degenerative disease that impacts many cervid species in North America (e.g., elk, moose, mule deer, and white...

Date published: April 16, 2020
Status: Active

Bat Research

White-nose syndrome (WNS) caused by the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) has decimated hibernating bat populations across North America since it emerged 10 years ago in New York. As Pd has spread across North America, infection dynamics and mortality from WNS have varied among species and across sites. The mechanisms behind vulnerability of species across the current...

Date published: April 16, 2020
Status: Active

A continental-scale study of acoustic phenology to improve population monitoring and inform management of hibernating bats

Bat Research

Research collaboration: Winifred Frick (Bat Conservation International), Theodore Weller (U.S. Forest Service), Wayne Thogmartin (UMESC), Craig Willis (University of Winnipeg), and Brian Reichert (FORT...

Date published: April 16, 2020
Status: Active

Developing online integrated data visualization tools for WNS and NABat

Bat Research

Research collaboration: Brian Reichert (FORT), Anne Ballmann (NWHC), Jeremy Coleman (USFWS), Paul Cryan (FORT), Wayne Thogmartin (UMESC), and Katherine Irvine...

Date published: April 16, 2020
Status: Active

Quantifying vulnerability of bat species to White-nose Syndrome across North America

Bat Research

Research collaboration: Winifred Frick (Bat Conservation International), Brian Reichert (FORT), Theodore Weller (US Forest Service), Wayne Thogmartin (UMESC) and the North American Bat Colony Count...

Date published: November 29, 2016
Status: Active

Ecology of Wildlife Disease

Some of the biggest challenges facing wildlife today are changes to their environment from both natural and anthropogenic causes. Natural resource managers, planners, policy makers, industry and private landowners must make informed decisions and policies regarding management, conservation, and restoration of species, habitats, and ecosystem function in response to these changes.

Date published: October 27, 2016
Status: Active

Species Conservation

Large scale changes are occurring to our natural landscapes, often resulting in changes to the distribution and abundance of species living within these landscapes. Populations of many species affected by these natural or anthropogenic changes require focused management to ensure their conservation and sometimes recovery from the brink of extinction.

Date published: October 26, 2016
Status: Active

North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat)

North American bats face unprecedented threats including habitat loss and fragmentation, white-nose syndrome, wind energy development, and climate change. However, it is difficult to evaluate the impacts of these threats due to a lack of basic information about the distribution and abundance of bats across the continent. Although bat monitoring has long been conducted in individual areas and...

Date published: October 18, 2016
Status: Active

Ecology of Plague

In North America, the flea transmitted plague bacterium (Yersinia pestis) has colonized and altered native animal communities and ecosystems for more than a century. Many species have suffered adverse consequences from plague, perhaps none more than the endangered black-footed ferret. Plague has established within the ranges of all North American prairie dog species, which collectively serve...

Date published: October 17, 2016
Status: Active

Non-invasive Surveillance of Bat Hibernacula to Investigate Potential Behavioral Causes of Mortality Associated with White Nose Syndrome

White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) is a devastating disease that threatens the survival of hibernating bats in North America. Since first documented in the winter of 2005/2006, WNS has spread from a very small area of New York across at least two thousand kilometers and half or more of states and provinces in the U.S. and Canada.

Date published: October 14, 2016
Status: Active

Ecological Investigations of White-Nose Syndrome in Bats

White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) is a devastating disease that threatens the survival of hibernating bats in North America. Since first documented in the winter of 2005/2006, WNS has spread from a very small area of New York across at least two thousand kilometers in half or more of states and provinces in the U.S. and Canada. Over five million bats are estimated to have died during the past decade...

Date published: October 14, 2016
Status: Active

Effects of Soil and Colony Age on Flea Densities

Abundance of fleas is thought to drive rates of plague transmission in the wild. In the complex process of plague maintenance and transmission, fleas as vectors are a potentially weak link in the system that can be exploited. To date, exploiting this link has provided the only stand-alone tools that are operationally effective for managing plague in the black-footed ferret/prairie dog...