Fort Collins Science Center

Fish and Wildlife

Filter Total Items: 63
Date published: August 4, 2016
Status: Active

Taxonomic Uncertainty

Taxonomic uncertainty can be assessed using genetic data, along with other lines of evidence (such as morphological and behavioral characteristics). Such data can be used to identify and assess taxonomic boundaries (species, subspecies, hybrids) and in many cases redefine them. Such delineations are highly relevant for species status determinations (endangered, threatened, or at-risk).

Date published: August 3, 2016
Status: Active

Family Relationships and Mating Systems

Family relationships and mating systems can be investigated and defined using genetic data. This information is potentially important for conservation and management as it may influence effective population size and levels of genetic diversity.

Date published: August 2, 2016
Status: Active

Population Models

Population models can incorporate genetic data to assess potential impacts of different management strategies on connectivity, effective population size, and genetic diversity. 

Date published: August 1, 2016
Status: Active

Ecology of Insect-eating Bats

Bats are the only flying mammals that are active mostly at night and occur on all continents except Antarctica. Bats are ecologically diverse, with a range of species that specialize in feeding on fruit, nectar, blood, fish, small mammals, and insects. However, of the more than 1,100 known species of bats on Earth, the majority specialize in feeding on insects. In the United States for example...

Date published: July 29, 2016
Status: Active

Ecological Applications of Stable Isotopes

Environmental contaminants of natural and anthropogenic origin represent a major stressor to ecosystems, including human and wildlife populations. FORT scientists are studying these stressors in order to understand the contaminant cycling under natural environmental conditions. Stable isotope techniques are extremely useful in resolving trophic pathways by which contaminants become...

Date published: July 22, 2016
Status: Completed

Biometrics

Mathematical and statistical methods used to analyze biological data are powerful research tools that play several important roles in conceptualizing and understanding the structure and dynamics of ecological systems. Through the development of specialized and sophisticated quantitative tools and models, the complex nature of data arising from studies of ecological systems can be understood....

Date published: July 21, 2016
Status: Active

Foraging Ecology Using Stable Isotopes

Understanding species habitat requirements is incomplete without insight into nutrition, including various aspects of foraging ecology. Traditional diet studies can be challenging because of logistics, issues related to resource availability, and observations are often short-term in nature based on gut contents or scat. Additionally, perturbations such as species introductions, habitat ...

Date published: July 21, 2016
Status: Active

Landscape Genetics of Sage Grouse

Greater and Gunnison sage-grouse populations are species considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Loss and fragmentation of sagebrush habitats are among the primary causes of decline in these species. A fundamental need for species conservation is to identify and subsequently maintain a set of connected populations. Landscape genetics combines the fields of population...

Date published: July 21, 2016
Status: Active

Bat Fatalities at Wind Turbines—Investigating the Causes and Consequences

Wind energy is one of the fastest-growing industries in the world and represents an important step toward reducing dependence on nonrenewable sources of power. However, widespread deployment of industrial wind turbines is having unprecedented adverse effects on certain species of bats that roost in trees and migrate. Bats are beneficial consumers of agricultural insect pests and migratory...

Date published: July 5, 2016
Status: Active

Effects of Contaminants on Linked Aquatic and Terrestrial Food Webs

Most aquatic insects live in fresh water as larvae and move to land as flying adults to complete their life cycle. Although often ignored, the emergence of adults can transfer the effects of contamination from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems as the adults are eaten by predators such as spiders, birds, and bats.

Date published: July 5, 2016
Status: Active

Resource for Advanced Modeling (RAM)

Branch scientists have developed the Resource for Advanced Modeling (RAM), a modeling facility for collaborative research both within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and with the wider research community. The facility provides a collaborative working environment for up to 20 scientists from within the USGS and the wider research community. There are networked, wireless computing facilities...

Date published: July 5, 2016
Status: Active

Bat Species of Concern: An Ecological Synthesis for Resource Managers

A large number of bat species are considered “species of concern” in the United States and its Territories, and resource managers are increasingly interested in learning more about their distribution, status, and potential management.