Fort Collins Science Center

Tools and Techniques

Filter Total Items: 35
Date published: October 17, 2016
Status: Active

Non-invasive Surveillance of Bat Hibernacula to Investigate Potential Behavioral Causes of Mortality Associated with White Nose Syndrome

White-Nose Syndrome (WNS) is a devastating disease that threatens the survival of hibernating bats in North America. Since first documented in the winter of 2005/2006, WNS has spread from a very small area of New York across at least two thousand kilometers and half or more of states and provinces in the U.S. and Canada.

Date published: October 13, 2016
Status: Active

Contaminant Biology: Stable Isotope Applications

Environmental contaminants of natural and anthropogenic origin represent a major stressor to ecosystems, including human and wildlife populations.

Date published: October 13, 2016
Status: Active

Biogeography: Stable Isotope Applications

The distribution of species across the landscape is of great interest to conservation biology. Habitat quality and quantity are thought to be important drivers of occurrence and distribution, and numerous studies have demonstrated fitness-related consequences. However, for species with cryptic or migratory life histories, we often lack sufficient detail about habitat usage and in many cases,...

Date published: August 18, 2016
Status: Active

Small Unoccupied Aircraft System (sUAS) Flights

Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) are an emerging technology which may result in safer and improved methods to conduct wildlife surveys. The objective of this task is to test the capabilities of various cameras and sensors onboard a small Unoccupied (or unmanned) Aircraft System (sUAS) to determine if they are a useful and effective tool to inventory various flora and fauna important to...

Date published: August 11, 2016
Status: Active

Biogeochemistry: Stable Isotope Applications

Biogeochemical cycling is a cornerstone of ecosystem function and structure. Much has been learned about element cycles in a variety of systems using standard geochemical techniques. 

Date published: August 10, 2016
Status: Active

Molecular Ecology Lab (MEL)

The Molecular Ecology Laboratory applies genetic and genomic technologies to address a variety of complex questions and conservation issues facing the management of the Nation's fish and wildlife resources. Together with our partners, we design and implement studies to document genetic diversity and the distribution of genetic variation among individuals, populations, and species. Information...

Date published: August 9, 2016
Status: Active

Genomics and Bioinformatics

Genetic analysis is increasingly used to understand ecosystem processes and inform conservation, management, and policy. I assist USGS researchers and their collaborators in the design, analysis, and interpretation of high-throughput genetic studies. Common applications include: detecting genes responsive to particular environmental stressors in a sentinel species or species of conservation...

Date published: August 9, 2016
Status: Active

Conservation Genomics

Conservation genomics is a new field of science that applies novel whole-genome sequencing technology to problems in conservation biology. Rapidly advancing molecular technologies are revolutionizing wildlife ecology, greatly expanding our understanding of wildlife and their interactions with the environment.  In the same way that molecular tools such as microsatellites revolutionized wildlife...

Date published: August 8, 2016
Status: Active

Landscape Genetics

Landscape genetics is a recently developed discipline that involves the merger of molecular population genetics and landscape ecology.  The goal of this new field of study is to provide information about the interaction between landscape features and microevolutionary processes such as gene flow, genetic drift, and selection allowing for the understanding of processes that generate genetic...

Date published: August 7, 2016
Status: Active

Population Genetics

Population genetics is an area of research that examines the distribution of genetic variation and levels of genetic diversity within and between populations. This information provides insights into the level of connectedness of populations throughout a species’ range and can be used to identify unique populations or those with low levels of genetic diversity. 

Date published: August 6, 2016
Status: Active

Molecular Tagging

Molecular tagging is a new application of molecular genetic techniques to traditional mark-recapture methodology designed to address situations where traditional methods fail. In such studies, non-invasively collected samples (such as feces, feathers, or fur) are used as a source of DNA that is then genotyped at multiple loci such that each individual animal can be uniquely identified. Thus,...

Date published: August 5, 2016
Status: Active

Environmental DNA (eDNA)

Environmental DNA (eDNA) is organismal DNA that can be found in the environment. Environmental DNA originates from cellular material shed by organisms (via skin, excrement, etc.) into aquatic or terrestrial environments that can be sampled and monitored using new molecular methods. Such methodology is important for the early detection of invasive species as well as the detection of rare and...