Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center (FRESC)

Multiple Disturbances

Filter Total Items: 9
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Wildlife Responses to Climate, Land Use, and Invasive Species

Wildlife issues drive many federal and state land management decisions, either because of litigation or mandates to protect habitat and limit extinction risks. We conduct applied research to meet this need, particularly related to the effects of natural (disease, predation) and anthropogenic (habitat loss, invasive species) stressors on wildlife populations and communities. Research on the...

Contacts: David S Pilliod
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Wildfire Impacts, and Post-Fire Rehabilitation and Restoration

Land use and unintentional (e.g., wildfire) disturbances are increasingly dominant factors affecting land-use planning and management of semiarid landscapes, particularly in sagebrush steppe rangelands. In the last 10-20 years, wildfires are occurring more frequently and increasingly in very large burn patches.

Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Terrestrial Vegetation Dynamics

Plant communities are the foundation for terrestrial trophic webs and animal habitat, and their structure and species composition are a result of biological and physical drivers. Additionally, they have a major role in geologic, geomorphic and soil development processes. Several global and regional stressors (for example, climate change, atmospheric and precipitation chemistry, introduced...

Contacts: Andrea Woodward
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Modeling Disturbance and Ecosystem Change at Landscape Scales

Models can be used to investigate changes in ecosystems and disturbance regimes across large landscapes and over long periods of time, i.e., at spatial and temporal scales that are typically not possible or practical using field-based observational or experimental methods. These spatially explicit models can also be used to investigate complex relationships and interactions among various...

Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Integrating Science and Adaptive Land Management

Widespread habitat deterioration due to fire and invasive species in the Great Basin have created a need for coordination across land agencies and between science and management activities in the Great Basin. 

Date published: November 7, 2017
Status: Active

Ecology of Aspen-Associated Avian Species

Quaking aspen stands typically support higher avian abundance and diversity than surrounding habitat types, and our current distribution and abundance of bird species in the Great Basin is likely tied to the persistence of aspen on the landscape. Aspen populations are declining in much of the West due to changes in fire frequency, competition with conifers, animal grazing, drought, disease,...

Contacts: Susan Earnst
Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Declining Amphibians

Amphibian populations world-wide are declining for reasons that include disease, habitat loss, and invasive species. Our research addresses these threats as part of the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI), a nationwide, federally funded program. We work with resource managers to provide information that improves understanding of status of amphibians and the implications of...

Contacts: Michael J Adams
Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Disturbance History in Natural Communities

Disturbance is an important process in most natural communities, shaping ecosystem composition, structure, and function. Studying and quantifying natural disturbance regimes (e.g., fire) often reveal complex relationships with climate, vegetation, and topography, as well as with other disturbance agents (e.g., insects and wind). Characterizing and quantifying past disturbances regimes is also...

Date published: October 31, 2017
Status: Completed

Landscape Patterns and Disturbance

FRESC scientists investigate whole-system processes and relationships across space and time in order to advance understanding of natural, managed, and disturbed ecosystems. This includes research, monitoring, remote sensing, modeling, and synthesis to describe the patterns of change across landscapes and the biological and physical processes that generate them.