Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center (FRESC)

Threats

Filter Total Items: 10
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Threat of Invasives to Native Species and Ecosystems

Invasive species are a growing threat to native species and ecosystem processes in fresh waters. The Introducing non-native fish into an area may have no effect, little current effect, or the potential to seriously impact the native species, possibly resulting in their extinction. We conduct research to address the causes of invasions and their impacts. We also provide technical support for...

Contacts: Jason B Dunham
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Threat of Invasive Barred Owls to Northern Spotted Owls and their Habitats

As an apex predator and fiercely territorial invader, barred owls at high densities have the potential to affect a variety of native wildlife through competition, niche displacement, and predation. Such impacts may be especially problematic for conservation of the federally threatened northern spotted owl, whose populations have continued to decline despite widespread protection of old forest...

Contacts: J David Wiens
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Interaction between Energy Development and Raptors

Energy production has become essential for modern society. At the same time, this process can have negative effects on wildlife and ecosystems. It is in the best interest of society and the environment to understand these effects and to manage and mitigate for them. Our team focuses on measuring how energy development influences birds of prey and learning how to minimize negative influences....

Contacts: Todd E Katzner
Date published: November 9, 2017
Status: Active

Genetic and Demographic Analyses of Species at Risk

Genetic and demographic analyses are key to understanding mechanisms of population and species declines and recovery potential. They are equally important to managers assessing risk of extinction relative to the provisions of the Endangered Species Act, and for establishing recovery goals and planning recovery actions. In addition to the methodologically and conceptually complex nature of...

Contacts: Susan M Haig
Date published: November 9, 2017
Status: Active

Effects of Climate Change and Other Environmental Stressors on Water Birds and Their Habitats

Predicted climate impacts on arid U.S. Great Basin wetlands will alter their number, distribution, and quality (e.g., salinity). The scarcity and isolation of these wetlands make them essential not only to wildlife but to ranchers, farmers, and urban areas that rely on their ecosystem services. Great Basin wetlands are important habitats for migratory birds at high volumes, but they become...

Contacts: Susan M Haig
Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Ecological Effects of Contaminants

Whereas the other themes of the Contaminant Ecology Research Program focus on where, why, and how contaminants cycle and bioaccumulate in ecological systems, this theme is focused on determining what happens at environmentally relevant concentrations.

Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Ecology and Conservation of Sensitive Herpetofauna Species

Many species of amphibians and reptiles are declining or facing population threats in the West related to habitat loss, habitat alteration, introduction of non-native species, and other factors. Our work focuses on the status and trends of resident herpetofauna and how to better manage their habitats. Much of the effort is undertaken with cooperators, particularly with other agencies in the...

Contacts: R. B. Bury
Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Declining Amphibians

Amphibian populations world-wide are declining for reasons that include disease, habitat loss, and invasive species. Our research addresses these threats as part of the Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI), a nationwide, federally funded program. We work with resource managers to provide information that improves understanding of status of amphibians and the implications of...

Contacts: Michael J Adams
Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Conservation Issues for Sage-Grouse and Sagebrush Ecosystems

Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are the most visible of >350 plant and wildlife species that depend on sagebrush. Their conservation status was determined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2010 to be warranted for listing but precluded by higher priorities. Habitat and population fragmentation, coupled with inadequate regulatory mechanisms to control development on...

Contacts:
Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Climate and Aquatic Ecosystems

Effects of changing climate on aquatic ecosystems requires understanding a complex series of interactions between terrestrial climates, their corresponding impacts on hydrological processes, and ultimately a suite of biological responses. These uncertainties stand in contrast to the urgent need for reliable information to be used in developing long-term strategies for climate adaptation to...

Contacts: Jason B Dunham