Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center (FRESC)

Avian Ecology

Filter Total Items: 13
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Threat of Invasive Barred Owls to Northern Spotted Owls and their Habitats

As an apex predator and fiercely territorial invader, barred owls at high densities have the potential to affect a variety of native wildlife through competition, niche displacement, and predation. Such impacts may be especially problematic for conservation of the federally threatened northern spotted owl, whose populations have continued to decline despite widespread protection of old forest...

Contacts: J David Wiens
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Spatial Ecology of Wide-Ranging Birds

Flight facilitates comparatively rapid access to large areas, and the study of the movements of birds is essential for learning their relationships to their environment, and for managing the resources on which they depend and conserving the communities in which they live. Often the amount of space used by raptors varies with behavior associated with the birds’ ages and with the annual cycle....

Contacts: Mark R Fuller
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Raptor Surveys and Monitoring

This research largely involves developing and applying survey methods to gather and analyze data to study raptor population biology and population status. Results also provide land and wildlife managers with information about the general distribution and local occurrence of birds of prey. Most raptor species occur in low densities compared to other birds. Raptors are widely dispersed during...

Contacts: Mark R Fuller
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Raptor Biology, Ecology, and Land-Use Effects

We study aspects of basic biology and ecology of predators to contribute to understanding ecosystems and to provide results that can be applied to the conservation of natural resources. Subject matter includes behavior and relationships of birds to features of their environment such as habitat, prey, and contaminants.

Contacts: Mark R Fuller
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Interaction between Energy Development and Raptors

Energy production has become essential for modern society. At the same time, this process can have negative effects on wildlife and ecosystems. It is in the best interest of society and the environment to understand these effects and to manage and mitigate for them. Our team focuses on measuring how energy development influences birds of prey and learning how to minimize negative influences....

Contacts: Todd E Katzner
Date published: November 9, 2017
Status: Active

Golden Eagles and Renewable Energy Development in the Western U.S.

Development of wind-power and solar facilities is expected to increase dramatically in areas occupied by golden eagles in the western U.S. Renewable energy development in areas used by golden eagles poses a unique challenge to natural resource managers because of this species’ vulnerability to collisions with wind turbines and sensitivity to changes in human land-use.

Contacts: J David Wiens
Date published: November 9, 2017
Status: Active

Genetic and Demographic Analyses of Species at Risk

Genetic and demographic analyses are key to understanding mechanisms of population and species declines and recovery potential. They are equally important to managers assessing risk of extinction relative to the provisions of the Endangered Species Act, and for establishing recovery goals and planning recovery actions. In addition to the methodologically and conceptually complex nature of...

Contacts: Susan M Haig
Date published: November 9, 2017
Status: Active

Effects of Climate Change and Other Environmental Stressors on Water Birds and Their Habitats

Predicted climate impacts on arid U.S. Great Basin wetlands will alter their number, distribution, and quality (e.g., salinity). The scarcity and isolation of these wetlands make them essential not only to wildlife but to ranchers, farmers, and urban areas that rely on their ecosystem services. Great Basin wetlands are important habitats for migratory birds at high volumes, but they become...

Contacts: Susan M Haig
Date published: November 7, 2017
Status: Active

Ecology of Aspen-Associated Avian Species

Quaking aspen stands typically support higher avian abundance and diversity than surrounding habitat types, and our current distribution and abundance of bird species in the Great Basin is likely tied to the persistence of aspen on the landscape. Aspen populations are declining in much of the West due to changes in fire frequency, competition with conifers, animal grazing, drought, disease,...

Contacts: Susan Earnst
Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Conservation Ecology and Monitoring of Raptors

Raptors, or birds of prey, are often used to indicate the state of an ecosystem, and monitoring their populations can help us to understand ecosystem processes. Raptors are particularly good animals for monitoring because they are big and therefore charismatic and easy to observe. Whether we’re monitoring nesting biology and reproductive output, counting individuals on roads, or setting up...

Contacts: Todd E Katzner
Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Conservation Issues for Sage-Grouse and Sagebrush Ecosystems

Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are the most visible of >350 plant and wildlife species that depend on sagebrush. Their conservation status was determined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2010 to be warranted for listing but precluded by higher priorities. Habitat and population fragmentation, coupled with inadequate regulatory mechanisms to control development on...

Contacts:
Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Avian Movements, Monitoring, and Conservation

The Migratory Connectivity Project (MCP) is an effort to research, collect, and provide information about animal movement and full lifecycle biology, particularly for North American bird species, to agencies and NGOs interested in their conservation.

Contacts: Susan M Haig