Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center

Ecosystem and Landscape

Filter Total Items: 25
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Integrating Science and Adaptive Land Management

Widespread habitat deterioration due to fire and invasive species in the Great Basin have created a need for coordination across land agencies and between science and management activities in the Great Basin. 

Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Information for Golden Eagle Management

This work provides basic information for managing golden eagles in the context of the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (16 U.S.C. 668-668d). The recent development of energy resources, such as wind, oil, gas, and solar, can potentially affect landscapes in ways that require changes in golden eagle management practices. Our work emphasizes priority information needs identified by the USGS...

Contacts: Mark R Fuller
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Indicators of Rangeland Health

Rangelands are natural ecosystems where the native vegetation consists predominantly of grasses, grass-like plants, forbs, or shrubs. Rangelands include natural grasslands, savannas, shrublands, oak and pinyon-juniper woodlands, many deserts, tundra, alpine communities, marshes, and wet meadows.

Contacts: David A Pyke
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Habitat Mapping and Modeling

Accurately quantifying and mapping wildlife habitat is critical to investigations of species distribution and habitat relationships, and can greatly facilitate management of forests for multiple resources. However acquiring field-based, empirical data is often costly and labor intensive. Modeling provides an alternative technique for describing and mapping habitat, but the usefulness of models...

Contacts: Joan C Hagar
Date published: November 9, 2017
Status: Active

Fire Effects and Forest Recovery

This research theme examines the impacts of prescribed fire on plant productivity, soil physical, chemical, and biological characteristics, and nutrient leaching. Results from this research will enable improved decision-making of how to manage fire-prone forests to maintain long-term forest fertility and productivity, especially across wide climate gradients characteristic of the Pacific...

Date published: November 7, 2017
Status: Active

Ecosystem Baselines and Restoration

This research theme coalesces studies of old-growth temperate forests in several major thematic areas including landscape and ecosystem controls on watershed nutrient export, wildfire disturbance legacies on biogeochemical cycling, and the imprint of tree species on soil nutrients in old-growth forests. 

Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Disturbance History in Natural Communities

Disturbance is an important process in most natural communities, shaping ecosystem composition, structure, and function. Studying and quantifying natural disturbance regimes (e.g., fire) often reveal complex relationships with climate, vegetation, and topography, as well as with other disturbance agents (e.g., insects and wind). Characterizing and quantifying past disturbances regimes is also...

Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Developing Tools for Climate Change Adaptation

Resource managers contend with achieving goals and mandates in an ever-changing world of exotic species invasions, emerging diseases, extinction risks, and shifting public expectations among others. These challenges must be faced in the context of a changing climate, which potentially alters ecosystem structure and function and undermines the predictability of ecosystem response to management...

Contacts: Andrea Woodward
Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Contaminant Bioaccumulation through Food Webs

This is a broad theme representing the largest component of the Contaminant Ecology Research Program, acting as a bridge between the “Habitat and Land Use Influences” and “Ecological Effects” themes. “Contaminant Bioaccumulation” focuses on quantifying the transfer or movement of contaminants through food webs, and identifying the primary landscape factors and ecological mechanisms that are...

Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Conservation Issues for Sage-Grouse and Sagebrush Ecosystems

Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are the most visible of >350 plant and wildlife species that depend on sagebrush. Their conservation status was determined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2010 to be warranted for listing but precluded by higher priorities. Habitat and population fragmentation, coupled with inadequate regulatory mechanisms to control development on...

Contacts:
Date published: November 6, 2017
Status: Active

Climate and Ecosystem Biogeochemistry

This research theme advance fundamental understanding of climate-biogeochemistry interactions, with wide applicability to virtually all terrestrial ecosystems.

Date published: October 12, 2017
Status: Active

Landscape Ecology of Aquatic Ecosystems

Landscape ecology has only a short history as a recognized discipline, but it has transformed our thinking about the interplay between pattern and process. We now understand that many smaller-scale phenomena are driven by spatial processes, such as the proximity of different habitats to one another, the ability of organisms to move through landscapes, and the dynamics of natural disturbance...

Contacts: Jason B Dunham