Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center (FRESC)

Restoration and Monitoring

Filter Total Items: 22
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Wildlife Monitoring in National Parks

Maintaining a current understanding of ecological conditions is fundamental to the National Park Service in meeting its mission to preserve park resources in an unimpaired state for future generations. Ecological monitoring establishes reference conditions, which over time help to define the normal limits of natural variation, determine standards for comparing future changes, and identify the...

Contacts: Kurt J Jenkins
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Tools and Techniques for Monitoring Wildlife Habitats, Communities, and Populations

Resource monitoring is critically important for documenting trends and learning from the past (i.e., adaptive management), yet it has been plagued with poor design and execution. We are developing and testing novel approaches to wildlife monitoring, including the use of non-invasive field sampling and molecular markers to determine patterns of species occurrence and population abundance...

Contacts: David S Pilliod
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Wildfire Impacts, and Post-Fire Rehabilitation and Restoration

Land use and unintentional (e.g., wildfire) disturbances are increasingly dominant factors affecting land-use planning and management of semiarid landscapes, particularly in sagebrush steppe rangelands. In the last 10-20 years, wildfires are occurring more frequently and increasingly in very large burn patches.

Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Role of Fire and Fuels in Ecological Restoration

Fuel loads are important drivers of fire behavior, and fire is an important natural process that can also be used as a tool for ecological restoration purposes. Land managers and fire experts attempt to track and manipulate fuel loads in order to assess fire risk, control fire behavior, and restore ecosystems. Thus, understanding the relationships between fire, vegetation dynamics, and fuel...

Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Restoration and Management of Aquatic Ecosystems

Restoration of aquatic ecosystems involves a broad spectrum of active and passive efforts. Passive efforts rely on natural recovery of ecosystems, such as land use practices that protect riparian zones and sources of wood and sediment that drive the geomorphic and associated biological functions in streams. Active efforts involve more direct intervention, usually applied to specific locations...

Contacts: Jason B Dunham
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Restoration of Shrub Steppe Ecosystems

This research theme provides land managers information to help them make restoration decision at local and landscape scales.

Contacts: David A Pyke
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Raptor Surveys and Monitoring

This research largely involves developing and applying survey methods to gather and analyze data to study raptor population biology and population status. Results also provide land and wildlife managers with information about the general distribution and local occurrence of birds of prey. Most raptor species occur in low densities compared to other birds. Raptors are widely dispersed during...

Contacts: Mark R Fuller
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Oregon Spotted Frog

The Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) is a medium-sized anuran native to the northwestern United States. Body coloration ranges from brown or tan to brick red, usually overlaid with dark, ragged spots. Oregon spotted frogs can be distinguished from other native species by their relatively short hind legs, orange or red wash of color on underside of abdomen and legs, and upturned...

Contacts: Michael J Adams
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Aquatic Habitats and Communities

The Pacific Northwest includes a patchwork of public lands managed by numerous state and federal agencies. Our research informs and supports these agencies as they conserve and manage native amphibian species, including pre- and post-treatment assessment, decision support, long-term monitoring, population translocation, and habitat restoration.

 

Contacts: Michael J Adams
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Interaction between Energy Development and Raptors

Energy production has become essential for modern society. At the same time, this process can have negative effects on wildlife and ecosystems. It is in the best interest of society and the environment to understand these effects and to manage and mitigate for them. Our team focuses on measuring how energy development influences birds of prey and learning how to minimize negative influences....

Contacts: Todd E Katzner
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Information for Golden Eagle Management

This work provides basic information for managing golden eagles in the context of the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (16 U.S.C. 668-668d). The recent development of energy resources, such as wind, oil, gas, and solar, can potentially affect landscapes in ways that require changes in golden eagle management practices. Our work emphasizes priority information needs identified by the USGS...

Contacts: Mark R Fuller
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Indicators of Rangeland Health

Rangelands are natural ecosystems where the native vegetation consists predominantly of grasses, grass-like plants, forbs, or shrubs. Rangelands include natural grasslands, savannas, shrublands, oak and pinyon-juniper woodlands, many deserts, tundra, alpine communities, marshes, and wet meadows.

Contacts: David A Pyke