Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center (FRESC)

Terrestrial Wildlife

Filter Total Items: 9
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Wildlife Monitoring in National Parks

Maintaining a current understanding of ecological conditions is fundamental to the National Park Service in meeting its mission to preserve park resources in an unimpaired state for future generations. Ecological monitoring establishes reference conditions, which over time help to define the normal limits of natural variation, determine standards for comparing future changes, and identify the...

Contacts: Kurt J Jenkins
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Wildlife Responses to Climate, Land Use, and Invasive Species

Wildlife issues drive many federal and state land management decisions, either because of litigation or mandates to protect habitat and limit extinction risks. We conduct applied research to meet this need, particularly related to the effects of natural (disease, predation) and anthropogenic (habitat loss, invasive species) stressors on wildlife populations and communities. Research on the...

Contacts: David S Pilliod
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Wildlife-Habitat Relationships

Whether generalists or specialists, wildlife species use habitats based on their structural, compositional, and climatic characteristics. This use may vary with life stage, age, or physiological condition of the animal, as well as weather, season, food availability, need for cover or shelter, and other factors. Our research focuses on understanding the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that...

Contacts: David S Pilliod
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Tools and Techniques for Monitoring Wildlife Habitats, Communities, and Populations

Resource monitoring is critically important for documenting trends and learning from the past (i.e., adaptive management), yet it has been plagued with poor design and execution. We are developing and testing novel approaches to wildlife monitoring, including the use of non-invasive field sampling and molecular markers to determine patterns of species occurrence and population abundance...

Contacts: David S Pilliod
Date published: November 14, 2017
Status: Active

Tools and Techniques for Synthesizing Monitoring and Other Data

Determining the best strategy for managing natural resources often requires a synthetic analysis describing the interactions among a multiplicity of ecosystem components and driving factors. However, comprehensive data sets are rarely collected to include all factors relevant to a given management decision. When data are obtained from multiple sources, they are often difficult to synthesize...

Contacts: Andrea Woodward
Date published: November 13, 2017
Status: Active

Habitat Mapping and Modeling

Accurately quantifying and mapping wildlife habitat is critical to investigations of species distribution and habitat relationships, and can greatly facilitate management of forests for multiple resources. However acquiring field-based, empirical data is often costly and labor intensive. Modeling provides an alternative technique for describing and mapping habitat, but the usefulness of models...

Contacts: Joan C Hagar
Date published: November 9, 2017
Status: Active

Genetic and Demographic Analyses of Species at Risk

Genetic and demographic analyses are key to understanding mechanisms of population and species declines and recovery potential. They are equally important to managers assessing risk of extinction relative to the provisions of the Endangered Species Act, and for establishing recovery goals and planning recovery actions. In addition to the methodologically and conceptually complex nature of...

Contacts: Susan M Haig
Date published: November 9, 2017
Status: Active

Effects of Management on Wildlife and Habitats

Conifer forests in the Pacific Northwest are biologically and economically important, are intensively managed for multiple uses, and represent a large area in public domain. Therefore, understanding how management of conifer forests affects biodiversity across a range of spatial and temporal scales is critical for land management agencies.

Contacts: Joan C Hagar
Date published: November 7, 2017
Status: Active

Ecology of Rare and Declining Species and Communities of Conservation Concern

Special status species and habitats are often sentinels of accelerated ecosystem change and, by definition, are priorities for protection, restoration, or focused management.

Contacts: Joan C Hagar