Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center

Maps

Here you will find maps created by Lower Mississippi-Gulf scientists that lend visual identity to our data. The maps you find in this section were devised by our scientists using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) that help us interpret the data through spatial and geographic imagery.

Filter Total Items: 26
Date published: September 14, 2016

Hurricane Season—LMGWSC has the Louisiana Coast Covered

June 1 marks the beginning of hurricane season. Should storms arrive on the Louisiana coast, the people in coastal communities across the State, along with many Federal, State, and local agencies will need to know how the storms are affecting the coastal and low-lying areas.The USGS maintains an extensive network of coastal gages that provides critical time-sensitive water level.

Date published: September 14, 2016

Buffalo National River Services and River Level Guide

Real-time displays of current floating conditions at various sites along the Arkansas Buffalo River. 

Date published: September 14, 2016

MERAS framework

Subsurface geometry of the Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study (MERAS)

Date published: May 1, 2014

Major rivers and tributaries in Alabama (taken from Hutson and others, 2009)

As part of their mission to protect public health and aquatic ecosystems, Alabama state agencies need accurate and representative streamflow statistics to establish realistic and applicable criteria for both water quality and water quantity (fig. 1).

Date published: January 1, 2014

Arkansas Groundwater - Quality Network

The Arkansas Groundwater - Quality Network is a web map interface that provides rapid access to the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) NWIS and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) STORET databases of ambient groundwater information. The interface enables users to perform simple graphical analysis and download selected water-quality data. 

Date published: May 21, 2013

StreamStats Alabama

Beta version 4 is now available for most states on a trial basis, and version 3 remains available. Beta version 4 provides a single user interface (at http://streamstatsags.cr.usgs.gov/streamstats/) for all states that are implemented, rather than separate applications for each state, as in versions 2 and 3, and the user interface is more user friendly than previous versions. 

Date published: September 22, 2012

USGS StreamStats

StreamStats is a Web-based tool that provides streamflow statistics, drainage-basin characteristics, and other information for USGS streamgaging stations and for user-selected ungaged sites on streams. When users select the location of a streamgaging station, StreamStats provides previously published information from a database. When users select a site on an ungaged stream, 

Date published: September 4, 2012

U.S. Geological Survey Flood Inundation Mapping Science

Static flood-inundation map libraries consist of maps that have been created in advance of a flood that are ready to be served through the Internet. Each library consists of a set of flood extent and depth maps developed for predetermined stream stage intervals (for example, a map for each one foot of stage).

Date published: December 11, 2009

Development of a Watershed Boundary Dataset for Mississippi

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality, U.S. Department of Agriculture-Natural Resources Conservation Service, Mississippi Department of Transportation, U.S. Department of Agriculture-Forest Service, and the Mississippi Automated Resource Information System, developed a 1:24,000-scale Watershed Boundary Dataset for Mississipp.

Date published: September 30, 2005

Mississippi and Ohio River 7-Day Summary and Forecast

River and Coastal Forecast Information

Mississippi and Ohio River 7-Day Summary and Forecast

 

Date published: September 28, 2005

Water use, by county, in Alabama, 2005

Water is one of the most important of Alabama's natural resources. Water is not only a vital component of human existence, it is critical to the overall quality of life. In order to protect and preserve this resource for future generations, we must have a baseline of information to make decisions. 

Date published: January 1, 2005

Total withdrawals in million gallons per day by watershed

Water is one of the most important of Alabama's natural resources. Water is not only a vital component of human existence, it is critical to the overall quality of life. In order to protect and preserve this resource for future generations, we must have a baseline of information to make decisions.