MD-DE-DC WSC Surface Water Capabilities

USGS Studies Low-Flow Changes in the Delaware River Basin

USGS Studies Low-Flow Changes in the Delaware River Basin

Low flows measured during 1980-2018 increased along with increased precipitation, although low flows decreased in the Coastal Plain area, in the southern part of the basin, where water use and impervious surface have increased. 

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Zero or not? Causes and consequences of zero-flow stream gage reading

 Zero or not? Causes and consequences of zero-flow stream gage reading

Efforts to restore water quality in Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries often include extensive Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation on agricultural and developed lands, accounting for reductions of nitrogen loads, phosphorus, and sediment.

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Spatial, Temporal Patterns of BMPs in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

Spatial, Temporal Patterns of BMPs in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

Efforts to restore water quality in Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries often include extensive Best Management Practice implementation on agricultural and developed lands. These include a variety of methods to reduce nutrient and sediment loads.

READ THE REPORT HERE

Science Center Objects

As an integrated part of the WSC, the Surface Water Team monitors and conducts investigative research to describe and improve our region's understanding of extreme hydrologic events - droughts, floods and flood hazards, and coastal or bay storm surge and inundation. They also facilitate measurement of precipitation, streamflow, stage and computation of streamflow at locations in Maryland, Delaware, and the District of Columbia. Surface Water also conducts surface water-quality monitoring in our Hydrologic Networks to help meet many partner needs.

Guided by the Assistant Director for Data, the Surface Water Team utilizes a multidisciplinary approach in operating our Hydrologic Networks to meet the data-collection goals that support the needs of local and Regional partners and policy-makers, as well as the research interests of our academic partners and the USGS. This approach includes a broad knowledge of basin characteristics, stream geomorphology and hydrology, and coastal hydrology. This knowledge is combined with advanced statistical analysis and data-collection techniques in streamflow gaging, water-quality monitoring, and quality-assurance of all collected or computed data.

Surface Water Capabilities Highlights

As a Federal agency, the USGS provides water information that is fundamental to national and local economic well-being, protection of life and property, and effective management of the Nation’s water resources. Below, find data and tools relevant to a wide range of water resources and conditions including streamflow, groundwater, water quality, and water use and availability.

The USGS partners with many cooperators to build an infrastructure of state-of-the-art data collection, data processing, and data management tools providing an invaluable resources for analyses, mapping, modeling, and research. Below are a few of the tools that keeps cooperators coming back to parter with us.

NWIS WEB

The USGS's National Water Information System (NWIS) is a comprehensive and distributed application that supports the acquisition, processing, and long-term storage of water data. Water Data for the Nation serves as the publicly available portal to a geographically seamless set of much of the water data maintained within NWIS. For Maryland, Delaware, and the District of Columbia, the online National Water Informations System (NWIS WEB) serves...

Real-Time Data: 224 sites in Maryland, 58 in Delaware, and 13 in the District of Columbia

Historical Observations: 306 sites in Maryland, 86 in Delaware, and 14 in the District of Columbia

Daily Data: 391 sites in Maryland, 95 in Delaware, and 17 in the District of Columbia

Statistics (Daily/Monthly/Annual): 354 sites in Maryland, 75 in Delaware, and 11 in the District of Columbia

Peak-Flow Data: 279 sites in Maryland, 68 in Delaware, and 4 in the District of Columbia

Field Measurements: 608 sites in Maryland, 100 in Delaware, and 8 in the District of Columbia

Mobile Water Data

The new USGS Mobile Water Data site (m.waterdata.usgs.gov) is a site designed for mobile users. It highlights USGS current conditions water data. For example, you can use it to monitor conditions at a favorite river or stream. Any USGS current conditions water data is available. Simply use any browser to go to m.waterdata.usgs.gov. While the site was designed for smartphones, it may work fine on tablet computers, most other mobile devices and desktop computers.

StreamStats

StreamStats provides access to spatial analytical tools that are useful for water-resources planning and management, and for engineering and design purposes. The map-based user interface can be used to delineate drainage areas, get basin characteristics and estimates of flow statistics, and more. Available information varies from state to state. StreamStats works within Web browser software on personal computers and mobile devices, and is best viewed using the latest versions of Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge, Chrome, Opera or Firefox.

Flood Innundation Mapper

USGS Flood Inundation Maps, along with Internet information regarding current stage from the USGS streamgage, provide emergency management personnel and residents with information that is critical for flood-response activities, such as evacuations and road closures, as well as for post-flood recovery efforts. The Flood Innundation Mapper is a Web application that allows users to explore the full set of inundation maps that shows where flooding would occur given a selected stream condition. Users can also access historical flood information and potential loss estimates based on the severity of the flood. The Flood Innundation Mapper works within Web browser software on personal computers and mobile devices, and is best viewed using the latest versions of Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge, Chrome, Opera or Firefox.

PeakFQ

Program PeakFQ implements the Bulletin 17C procedures for flood-frequency analysis of streamflow records, providing estimates of flood magnitudes and their corresponding variance for a range of annual exceedance probabilities. The output also includes estimates of the parameters of the log-Pearson Type III frequency distribution, including the logarithmic mean, standard deviation, skew, and mean square error of the skew. The output graph includes the fitted frequency curve, systematic peaks, low outliers, censored peaks, interval peaks, historic peaks, thresholds, and confidence limits.

PeakFQ reads annual peaks in the standard peakfq (WATSTORE) text format available from NWISWeb at https://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/peak