National Minerals Information Center

Publications

The Center conducts analyses of and develops information on minerals-related issues, including minerals conservation, sustainability, availability, materials flow, and the economic health of the U.S. minerals industry. 

Key Publications

Historical and Time Series Data

Historical and Time Series Data

A compilation of data on mineral production, imports, exports, stocks, reported and apparent consumption publications.

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Periodic Publications

Periodic Publications

A subset of our monthly, quarterly, and annual publications

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Special Publications

Special Publications

Fact Sheets - Short introductions to mineral commodities, materials flow, and supply chain topics

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Filter Total Items: 564
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Year Published: 2007

Mineral resource of the month: vanadium

Vanadium, the name of which comes from Vanadis, a goddess in Scandinavian mythology, is one of the most important ferrous metals. Vanadium has many uses, but the metal’s metallurgical applications, such as an alloying element in iron and steel, account for more than 85 percent of U.S. consumption. The dominant nonmetallurgical use of the metal is...

Magyar, Michael J.
Mineral resource of the month: vanadium; 2007; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Magyar, Michael J.

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Year Published: 2007

Mineral Commodity Summaries 2007

Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

Mineral Commodity Summaries 2007; 2007; MINERAL; 2007; U.S. Geological Survey

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Year Published: 2006

Exploration review

This summary of international mineral exploration activities for the year 2005 draws upon available information from literature, industry and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. It provides data on exploration budgets by global region and mineral commodity and identifies significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas. It also...

Wilburn, D.R.
Exploration review; 2006; Article; Journal; Mining Engineering; Wilburn, D. R.

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Year Published: 2006

Mineral of the month: cement

Hydraulic cement is a virtually ubiquitous construction material that, when mixed with water, serves as the binder in concrete and most mortars. Only about 13 percent of concrete by weight is cement (the rest being water and aggregates), but the cement contributes all of the concrete’s compressional strength. The term “hydraulic” refers to the...

van Oss, Hendrik G.
Mineral of the month: cement; 2006; Article; Journal; Geotimes; van Oss, Hendrik G.

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Year Published: 2006

Mineral resource of the month: bismuth

Bismuth compounds are most known for their soothing effects on the stomach, wounds and sores. These properties make the compounds an essential part of many medicinal and cosmetic preparations, which until 1930 accounted for about 90 percent of the bismuth used. The subsequent development of low-melting alloys and chemical catalysts containing...

Carlin, James F.
Mineral resource of the month: bismuth; 2006; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Carlin, James F., Jr.

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Year Published: 2006

Mineral resource of the month: diatomite

Diatomite is a soft, very fine-grained, siliceous sedimentary rock that is usually very light grey or beige in color. It is very finely porous, very low in density and essentially chemically inert. Rocks containing diatomite are excellent reservoir rocks for hydrocarbons.

Founie, Alan
Mineral resource of the month: diatomite; 2006; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Founie, Alan

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Year Published: 2006

Mineral resource of the month: lithium

Lithium, the lightest metallic element, is silvery, white and soft, and highly reactive. It is used most frequently in chemical compounds or traded as mineral concentrates. Its thermal properties make it an ideal component in thermal shock-resistant ceramics, and its electrochemical properties make it an ideal material for several types of...

Ober, Joyce A.
Mineral resource of the month: lithium; 2006; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Ober, Joyce A.

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Year Published: 2006

Mineral resource of the month: tellurium

Global demand for tellurium has grown significantly in recent years owing to increased use in solar cells in the United States and Europe, thermoelectronics (especially in China) and steelmaking worldwide. Estimated global production, however, has remained relatively unchanged over the same period, while accumulated inventories have been exhausted...

George, Micheal W.
Mineral resource of the month: tellurium; 2006; Article; Journal; Geotimes; George, Micheal W.

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Year Published: 2006

Garnet--An Essential Industrial Mineral and January's Birthstone

Garnet is one of the most common minerals in the world. Occurring in almost any color, it is most widely known for its beauty as a gem stone. Because of its hardness and other properties, garnet is also an essential industrial mineral used in abrasive products, non-slip surfaces, and filtration. To help manage our Nation's resources of such...

Evans, James G.; Moyle, Phillip R.; Frank, David G.; Olson, Donald W.
Garnet--An Essential Industrial Mineral and January's Birthstone; 2006; FS; 2006-3149; Evans, James G.; Moyle, Phillip R.; Frank, David G.; Olson, Donald W.

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Year Published: 2006

Ball clay

In 2005, four companies including H.C. Spinks Clay, Kentucky-Tennessee Clay, Old Hickory Clay and Unimin mined ball clay in four states. Based on a preliminary survey of the ball clay industry, production reached 1.32 Mt valued at $53.3 million. Tennessee was the leading ball clay producer state with 61% of domestic production, followed by Texas,...

Virta, R.L.
Ball clay; 2006; Article; Journal; Mining Engineering; Virta, R. L.

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Year Published: 2006

Common clay and shale

At present, 150 companies produce common clay and shale in 41 US states. According to the United States Geological Survey (USGS), domestic production in 2005 reached 24.8 Mt valued at $176 million. In decreasing order by tonnage, the leading producer states include North Carolina, Texas, Alabama, Georgia and Ohio. For the whole year, residential...

Virta, R.L.
Common clay and shale; 2006; Article; Journal; Mining Engineering; Virta, R. L.

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Year Published: 2006

Fire clay

In 2005, six companies mined fire clay in Missouri, Ohio and South Carolina. Production was estimate to be 300 kt with a value of $8.3 million. Missouri was the leading producer state followed by Ohio and South Carolina. For the third consecutive year, sales and use of fire clays have been relatively unchanged. For the next few years, sales of...

Virta, R.L.
Fire clay; 2006; Article; Journal; Mining Engineering; Virta, R. L.