National Minerals Information Center

Publications

The Center conducts analyses of and develops information on minerals-related issues, including minerals conservation, sustainability, availability, materials flow, and the economic health of the U.S. minerals industry. 

Key Publications

Historical and Time Series Data

Historical and Time Series Data

A compilation of data on mineral production, imports, exports, stocks, reported and apparent consumption publications.

View All

Periodic Publications

Periodic Publications

A subset of our monthly, quarterly, and annual publications

View All

Special Publications

Special Publications

Fact Sheets - Short introductions to mineral commodities, materials flow, and supply chain topics

View All
Filter Total Items: 564
Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2005

Mineral of the month: aluminum

Aluminum is the second most abundant metallic element in Earth’s crust after silicon. Even so, it is a comparatively new industrial metal that has been produced in commercial quantities for little more than 100 years. Aluminum is lightweight, ductile, malleable and corrosion resistant, and is a good conductor of heat and electricity. Weighing...

Plunkert, Patricia A.
Mineral of the month: aluminum; 2005; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Plunkert, Patricia A.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2005

Mineral of the month: boron

What does boron have to do with baseball, apple pie, motherhood and Chevrolet? Boron minerals and chemicals are used in the tanning of leather baseballs and gloves; in micro-fertilizer to grow apples and in the glass and enamels of bakewares to cook apple pie; in boron detergents for soaking baby clothes and diapers; and in fiberglass parts for...

Lyday, Phyllis A.
Mineral of the month: boron; 2005; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Lyday, Phyllis A.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2005

Mineral of the month: cadmium

Cadmium, which was once used almost exclusively for pigments, now has many diverse applications. Cadmium’s low melting point, excellent electrical conductivity and resistance to corrosion make it valuable for many products including batteries, electroplated coatings, stabilizers for plastics, solar cells and nonferrous alloys. Today’s cadmium is...

Klimasauskas, Edward
Mineral of the month: cadmium; 2005; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Klimasauskas, Edward

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2005

Mineral of the month: chromium

Chromium is one of the most indispensable industrial metals and it plays an essential but hidden role in daily life. Chromium is used in many consumer and building products, and it contributes to a clean, efficient and healthy environment.

Papp, John F.
Mineral of the month: chromium; 2005; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Papp, John F.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2005

Mineral of the month: garnet

Garnet is the general name given to a group of complex silicate minerals, all with isometric crystal structure, similar properties and chemical compositions. Garnet occurs in every color of the spectrum except blue, but it is most commonly red, purple, brown and green. Garnet necklaces dating from the Bronze Age have been found in graves and also...

Olson, Donald
Mineral of the month: garnet; 2005; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Olson, Donald

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2005

Mineral of the month: magnesium

Magnesium, often confused with last month’s mineral of the month manganese, is valued primarily because of its light weight and high strength-to-weight ratio. Magnesium is the eighth most abundant element and constitutes about 2 percent of the Earth’s crust. It is the third most plentiful element dissolved in seawater, with a concentration...

Kramer, Deborah A.
Mineral of the month: magnesium; 2005; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Kramer, Deborah A.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2005

Mineral of the month: manganese

Manganese is one of the most important ferrous metals and one of the few for which the United States is totally dependent on imports. It is a black, brittle element predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production, which together provide the largest market for manganese (about...

Corathers, Lisa A.
Mineral of the month: manganese; 2005; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Corathers, Lisa

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2005

Mineral of the month: potash

In 1807, Sir Humphrey Davy discovered a metal during the electrolysis of potassium hydroxide; he named the metal potassium because it came from potash recovered from wood ashes. The four types of potash are the water-soluble compounds potassium chloride, potassium sulfate, potassium-magnesium sulfate and potassium nitrate. The early uses of potash...

Searls, James P.
Mineral of the month: potash; 2005; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Searls, James P.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2005

Mineral of the month: rhenium

Rhenium, an exotic, heat-resistant metal, has grown in importance since its discovery nearly 80 years ago. First isolated by a team of German chemists studying a platinum ore, the mineral was named for the Rhine River. From then until the 1960s, only 2 metric tons of rhenium were produced worldwide. In 2004, worldwide production was 40 metric tons.

Magyar, Michael J.
Mineral of the month: rhenium; 2005; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Magyar, Michael J.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2005

Mineral of the month: tin

Tin was one of the first metals discovered by humans and, like most metals, tin is rarely used by itself. Most tin is used as a protective coating or as an alloy with other metals in a diverse range of commercial and defense applications.

Carlin, James F.
Mineral of the month: tin; 2005; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Carlin, James F., Jr.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2005

Mineral resource of the month: boron

What does boron have to do with baseball, apple pie, motherhood and Chevrolet? Boron minerals and chemicals are used in the tanning of leather baseballs and gloves; in micro-fertilizer to grow apples and in the glass and enamels of bakewares to cook apple pie; in boron detergents for soaking baby clothes and diapers; and in fiberglass parts for...

Lyday, Phyllis A.
Mineral resource of the month: boron; 2005; Article; Journal; Geotimes; Lyday, Phyllis A.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2005

Mineral resources and consumption in the twenty-first century

Modern societies are highly dependent upon energy and mineral resources to produce and deliver the material goods and even the services of everyday life. Although societies' dependence upon fossil fuels is evident and understood by much of the population, few people are as well informed about their dependence upon a wide variety of nonfuel...

Simpson, R.D.; Toman, M.A.; Ayres, R.U.; Menzie, W. David; Singer, Donald A.; DeYoung,, John H.
Mineral resources and consumption in the twenty-first century; 2005; Article; Book; Scarcity and growth revisited: Natural resources and the environment in the new millennium; Menzie, W. David; Singer, Donald A.; DeYoung, John H., Jr.