Nevada Water Science Center

Hydrologic Research

The NVWSC scientists are developing state-of-the-art methods for water quantity and quality assessments, predictive hydrologic models that are key to evaluating future responses of the water cycle to climate change, water resource assessments instrumental to policy makers for clearly weighing the competing energy alternatives and evaluating the environmental cost for energy development, and water-quality monitoring to detect emerging and other drinking-water contaminants that pose a risk to public health.

Filter Total Items: 49
Date published: April 26, 2019
Status: Active

Amargosa Desert Research Site Collaborator Information

A USGS goal, under the auspices of the Toxic Substances Hydrology (Toxics) Program, is to provide and maintain the Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) as a field laboratory that will bring together scientists from various disciplines, agencies, and universities for focused study of processes that affect migration and fate of contaminants in a complex (i.e., real-world) setting. The main...

Contacts: Brian Andraski
Date published: April 26, 2019
Status: Active

Amargosa Desert Research Site Research Team

The multidisciplinary research team is made up of scientists from research institutes, universities, National laboratories, and the USGS. The USGS co-leaders for the team are Brian J. Andraski (ADRS Coordinator, Nevada Water Science Center) and David A. Stonestrom (National Research Program, California).

Contacts: Brian Andraski
Date published: April 26, 2019
Status: Active

Amargosa Desert Research Site Description

The Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS), in the northern Mojave Desert, is about 20 km east of Death Valley National Park. Recognizing the paucity of information on unsaturated-zone hydrology in arid regions, the USGS, in 1983, established the ADRS through agreements with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the State of Nevada. The ADRS serves as a field laboratory for the study of arid-...

Contacts: Brian Andraski
Date published: April 26, 2019
Status: Active

Amargosa Desert Research Site

In 1976, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began studies of unsaturated zone hydrology at a site in the Amargosa Desert near Beatty, Nevada, as part of the USGS Low-Level Radioactive Waste Program. The site is near disposal trenches for civilian waste.

Over the years, USGS investigations at the Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) have provided long-term "benchmark" information about...

Contacts: Brian Andraski
Date published: July 17, 2018
Status: Active

Collection of arsenic and associated geochemical data important to occurrence and mobility of arsenic in groundwater used for public supply in southern Carson Valley, Douglas County, Nevada

The Nevada Water Science Center (NVWSC) is increasing the spatial understanding of the distribution of arsenic and important geochemical information in groundwater resources near select water-supply wells in southern Carson Valley by collecting groundwater samples to complement the existing dataset (2006 – 2015).

Contacts: Angela Paul
Date published: July 17, 2018
Status: Active

Evaluating Potential Refugia for the Endangered Mohave Tui Chub

The USGS Nevada Water Science Center (NVWSC), in partnership with the National Park Service (NPS), is evaluating and monitoring the basic water quality and sediment chemistry of two proposed refugia and three established habitats for the endangered Mohave Tui Chub over the course of the year. NVWSC will also compare and evaluate findings to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency screening levels...

Contacts: Katherine Earp
Date published: June 13, 2018
Status: Active

Development of landscape variables to inform models of meadow vulnerabilities and adaptation under changing climate

The USGS Nevada Water Science Center is providing technical assistance for the collection of landscape variables hypothesized to influence meadow responses to climate and restoration activities. These data will be used in a decision support framework developed by the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) and Desert Research Institute (DRI). 

Date published: June 13, 2018
Status: Active

Assessment of Springsnail Abundance at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

USGS Nevada Water Science Center (NVWSC), in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), is performing a systematic field investigation designed to survey the status of springsnails and the condition of the springs in which they occur at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (AMNWR). 

Contacts: Erin Orozco
Date published: April 25, 2018
Status: Active

Evaluation of water-level decline and aquifer properties in the Virginia City Highlands and Highland Ranches Volcanic Rock aquifer system, Storey County, Nevada

The Virginia City Highlands and Highland Ranches (VC Highlands) are a rural residential housing area established along the ridge of the Virginia Range in Storey County, Nevada. Approximately 1,400 residents exclusively rely on domestic wells for water supply and domestic well depths range from 75 to 1,175 ft below land surface. NVWSC monitors water levels annually in two domestic wells in the...

Contacts: David W Smith
Date published: December 21, 2017
Status: Active

Quantifying Seepage Losses on the Truckee Canal, Derby Dam to Lahontan Reservoir

Seepage losses from the Truckee Canal poses major challenges to water managers. Seepage losses result in inefficiencies in water delivery and cause more water than is needed by farmers to be diverted from the Truckee River to meet required demands. Increased diversions from the Truckee River result in less water flowing through the lower Truckee River system and into Pyramid Lake, a terminal...

Contacts: Ramon C Naranjo
Date published: December 19, 2017

How are Endocrine-Disrupting Compounds Moving Through the Food Web in Lake Mead National Recreation Area?

Water quality in the Lake Mead National Recreation Area (LAKE), particularly Las Vegas Bay, is affected by water coming from the Las Vegas Wash, an urban perennial stream whose water is comprised of treated wastewater and urban runoff coming from the Las Vegas metropolitan area.  Common carp collected from Las Vegas Wash and Las Vegas Bay and...

Date published: December 18, 2017

TROD: Temperature Profiling Probe

Temperature measurements are routinely made for investigating ecological and hydrological processes. Temperature is a key parameter for monitoring the suitability of fisheries habitat and streambed temperature data are useful for estimating surface water and groundwater exchange. Measuring vertically nested temperatures at the streambed interface poses practical challenges. 

Contacts: Ramon C Naranjo