New York Water Science Center

Basin & Hydrogeologic Characterization

Filter Total Items: 10
Date published: October 18, 2021
Status: Active

Methods for Estimation Flood Magnitude and Frequency at Ungaged Streams in New York, excluding Long Island

Summary: Extreme flooding can threaten life and property in flood-prone areas, as well as cause damage to critical infrastructure along roadways and canals. The effective management of these areas, and appropriate design of structures along rivers and streams, relies on understanding the magnitude and frequency of floods at gaged locations, and the ability to estimate these data at ungaged st...

Date published: October 31, 2018
Status: Active

Determination of Sources of Water to the Tully Valley Mudboils

Background and Problem Tully Valley is part of the Onondaga Trough, which extends from the Valley Heads Moraine in the south to Onondaga Lake in the north near Syracuse, New York (fig. 1). The Onondaga Trough is filled with a complex sequence of glacial and post-glacial sediments that overlie Devonian carbonate rock and shale and Silurian shale and salt (fig.2). Mudboils, volcano-like cone...

Contacts: Paul Heisig
Date published: June 2, 2017
Status: Active

Long Island Precipitation and Recharge

Precipitation is water released from clouds in the form of rain, freezing rain, sleet, snow, or hail. It is the primary connection in the water cycle that provides for the delivery of atmospheric water to the Earth. Most precipitation falls as rain. 

Water seeping down from the land surface and reaching the water table adds to the groundwater and is called groundwater recharge....

Contacts: Jack Monti
Date published: May 30, 2017

Long Island Hydrogeologic Units

Long Island’s aquifer system consists of a seaward-dipping wedge of mostly unconsolidated stratified sediments comprised of sand, gravel, silt and clay.

Contacts: Jack Monti
Date published: October 23, 2015
Status: Active

Statewide Assessment of New York’s Karst Aquifers With an Inventory of Closed-Depression and Focused-Recharge Features

Background: The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (NYS DEC) and Health (NYS DOH) are concerned about groundwater contamination in the carbonate-bedrock aquifers in New York, especially relating to the unintended introduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and liquid manure to these aquifers. These carbonate rocks form extensive aquifers that transmit, and can yield...

Date published: October 21, 2015
Status: Active

Hydrogeologic Recharge Settings of the Carbonate-Bedrock Aquifers in Livingston and Monroe Counties, Western New York

Background: A sequence of gently dipping carbonate bedrock - the Bertie Formation, Akron Dolostone, and Onondaga Limestone crop out along a 2- to5-mile wide band in western and central New York. These bedrock units trend east-west for 250 miles across the State and form extensive carbonate-bedrock aquifers which transmit and yield water from solution-enlarged fractures, bedding planes, and...

Date published: August 10, 2015
Status: Active

Development of GIS datasets for selected aquifers in New York

Problem - Since the 1980s, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has mapped over 30 sand and gravel aquifers in upstate New York at the 1:24,000-scale. These mapped aquifers include both the primary and many of the principal aquifers as designated by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. Although the 1:24,000-scale maps are valuable in their present form, their usefulness is...

Date published: August 6, 2015
Status: Active

Nassau Hydrogeologic Maps

Problem - The major hydrogeologic units of Long Island, New York, have been delineated as part of the islandwide mapping effort of Smolensky, Buxton, and Shernoff that was published in 1989 as U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Atlas (HA) 709. Concern about local details in the hydrogeologic framework that may not be represented in HA-709 has led the USGS, in cooperation with the U.S...

Contacts: Jack Monti
Date published: August 6, 2015
Status: Active

Onondaga Lake Watershed Geographic Information System

Problem - The purpose of this project is to create a watershed GIS (Geographic Information System) to support the comprehensive cleanup and restoration of Onondaga Lake that is underway. A GIS is a computer system capable of capturing, storing, analyzing, and displaying geographically referenced information; that is, data identified according to location. Given the broad scope of the Onondag...

Date published: August 6, 2015
Status: Active

Regionalization of Channel Geomorphology Characteristics for Streams of New York State, Excluding Long Island

Problem - Geomorphologic techniques for stream channel and bank restoration are fast becoming the techniques of choice among federal, state, county, and local agencies to reduce suspended sediment loads, reduce flood damage, improve aquatic habitat, and generally stabilize stream channels. One reason for this upswing in use is that appropriate application of these techniques has been shown t...