Simulation of Ground-Water Flow and Chemistry to Evaluate Water-Management Alternatives in Kings and Queens Counties, New York

Science Center Objects

Water-management alternatives being considered for New York City involve aquifer storage and recovery, or ASR. An ASR system may store surplus water in an aquifer, then later recover this water in times of short supply. The success of an ASR system depends on the quantity and quality of water that can be withdrawn during recovery phases, which are influenced by hydrogeologic, microbiologica...

 
Water-management alternatives being considered for New York City involve aquifer storage and recovery, or ASR. An ASR system may store surplus water in an aquifer, then later recover this water in times of short supply. The success of an ASR system depends on the quantity and quality of water that can be withdrawn during recovery phases, which are influenced by hydrogeologic, microbiological, and geochemical factors. Mixing surface waters with ambient ground waters within a deep confined aquifer may cause freshwater/saltwater interface movement, clay swelling, mineral dissolution, new patterns of bacterial growth, and other hydrogeologic consequences. In 2005, data were collected at Tottenville, Staten Island, where a well was drilled through the unconsolidated deposits and into the underlying bedrock. Geophysical surveys and continuous geologic cores were collected from the borehole and archived. A suite of analyses are being conducted which include pore water extraction, carbon content, mineral identification, and bacteria identification. Deep confined water-bearing zones at Tottenville may correlate with units on Long Island and in New Jersey. In 2006, data on the Magothy and Lloyd aquifers on Long Island were collected at three drilling sites operated by the Nassau County Department of Public Works in southwest Nassau County. 
 
To evaluate the potential for ASR, computer models are being developed to simulate the complex interplay of hydrogeologic structures, flow boundaries, aqueous chemical reactions, mineral dissolution and precipitation, ion exchange, and geochemical reaction kinetics. 
 
Related Publications
  • Misut, P.E., Monti, Jack, Jr., and Voss, C.I., 2002, A three-dimensional model of saltwater intrusion in Kings and Queens Counties, New York [abs.], in Association of Long Island Geologists, Ninth Conference on Geology of Long Island and Metropolitan New York, Programs with Abstracts, State University of New York at Stony Brook, NY, April 20, 2002
  • Misut, P.E., Monti, Jack, Jr., and Voss, C.I., 2002, A three-dimensional finite-element model of seawater intrusion in western Long Island, New York, in 15th ASCE Engineering Mechanics Conference, June 2-5, 2002, Columbia University, NY, NY, 8 p.
  • Misut, P.E. and Voss, C.I., 2004, Simulation of seawater intrusion resulting from proposed expanded pumpage in New York City, USA (abstract), in Proc of XVth International Conference on Computational Methods in Water Resources, Chapel Hill, SC, June 13-17, 2004
  • Misut, P.E. and Voss, C.I., 2004, Simulation of subsea discharge to Jamaica Bay in New York City with a three-dimensional finite-element model with variable density: FEM, MODFLOW, and More; Carlsbad,Czech Republic, September 13-16, 2004, conf. proc. Abstract number 032
  • Misut, P.E. and Voss, C.I., 2007, Freshwater-saltwater transition zone movement during aquifer storage and recovery cycles in Brooklyn and Queens, New York City, USA: Journal of Hydrology, v. 337, Issues 1-2, p. 87-103, doi:10.1016/j.hydrol.2007.01.035
  • Misut, P.E., Yulinsky, W., Cohen, D., St.Germain, D., Voss, C.I., and Monti, J.Jr., 2003, Modeling seawater intrusion of the coastal plain aquifers of New York City, USA, in Second International Conference on Saltwater Intrusion and Coastal Aquifers--Monitoring, Modeling, and Management: Merida, Mexico, March 30-April 2, 2003, unpublished extended abstract

Project
Location by County

Kings County, NY, Queens County, NY