Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center

Coral Reefs

Filter Total Items: 21
Date published: September 30, 2021
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Wave Dynamics: Tres Palmas

Four video cameras look westward over the coast and the coral reef at Tres Palmas in Rincón, on the west coast of Puerto Rico. Two cameras look out at the horizon and over the ocean for the mid-field view; one camera offers a zoomed-in, far-field view overlooking the reef and out to the island of Desecheo, a U.S. National Wildlife Refuge; and another camera focuses on the beach.

Contacts: Curt Storlazzi, PhD, Miguel Canals-Silander, Patricia Chardon Maldonado
Date published: September 16, 2021
Status: Active

Role of Reefs in Coastal Protection

We are combining ocean, engineering, ecologic, social, and economic modeling to provide a high-resolution, rigorous, spatially-explicit valuation of the coastal flood protection benefits provided by coral reefs and the cost effectiveness of reef restoration for enhancing those benefits.

Date published: September 7, 2021
Status: Active

Quantifying Flood Risk and Reef Risk Reduction Benefits in Florida and Puerto Rico: The Consequences of Hurricane Damage, Long-term Degradation, and Restoration Opportunities

Coastal flooding and erosion from extreme weather events affect thousands of vulnerable coastal communities; the impacts of coastal flooding are predicted to worsen during this century because of population growth and climate change. Hurricanes Irma and Maria in 2017 were particularly devasting to humans and natural communities. The coral reefs off the State of Florida and the Commonwealth of...

Contacts: Curt Storlazzi, PhD, Michael Beck, Borja Reguero, Shay Viehman, Kim Yates
Date published: September 7, 2021
Status: Active

The Value of U.S. Coral Reefs for Risk Reduction

Summary of the report, “Rigorously valuing the role of U.S. coral reefs in coastal hazard risk reduction”

    Contacts: Curt Storlazzi, PhD, Michael Beck
    Date published: August 26, 2021
    Status: Active

    Climate Change and Land-use Histories

    We are developing new and unique oceanographic and environmental archives from coral skeleton records to better understand the compounding effects of land-use and environmental change on coral reef health.

    Contacts: Nancy Prouty
    Date published: August 26, 2021
    Status: Active

    Reef Resource Assessments - Planning for the Future

    We are mapping and assessing all of the important geologic and oceanographic factors to identify those coral reefs most at risk and those reefs that are potentially the most resilient and the most likely to recover from natural and human-driven impacts.

    Date published: June 25, 2021
    Status: Active

    Coral Reef Project: Puerto Rico

    To better understand how waves move across coral reefs and cause flooding on tropical shorelines, USGS scientists have installed video cameras and oceanographic instruments off San Juan and Rincón, Puerto Rico. Their work is part of a study funded by USGS after Hurricanes Irma and María. The offshore instruments measure wave heights and speeds; the onshore video cameras show where waves break...

    Date published: June 25, 2021
    Status: Active

    Reef Hydrodynamics and Sediment Processes

    The overall objective of this research effort is to better understand how circulation and sediment processes impact coral reefs and their adjacent coastlines.

    Date published: April 15, 2021
    Status: Active

    Coral Reef Project: Oʻahu

    As part of the Coral Reef Project, the USGS is working closely with other local groups to investigate poor water quality issues in Maunalua Bay on the southeast coast of Oʻahu.

    Date published: April 15, 2021
    Status: Active

    Coral Reef Project: Hawaiʻi

    As part of the USGS Coral Reef Project, the USGS is working on the Kona (west) coast of Hawaiʻi to evaluate geologic resources at two historical parks.

    Date published: November 17, 2020
    Status: Active

    Trace Inorganic Geochemistry Laboratory

    In the Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center’s Trace Inorganic Geochemistry Laboratory in Santa Cruz, California, we have an ultrapurification water system, CEM MarsX, and two Class-100 laminar air flow benches for sediment-geochemical provenance studies and organic matter sourcing.