Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center

Publications

Filter Total Items: 461
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Year Published: 2017

No evidence of critical slowing down in two endangered Hawaiian honeycreepers

There is debate about the current population trends and predicted short-term fates of the endangered forest birds, Hawai`i Creeper (Loxops mana) and Hawai`i `Ākepa (L. coccineus). Using long-term population size estimates, some studies report forest bird populations as stable or increasing, while other studies report signs of population...

Rozek, Jessica C.; Camp, Richard J.; Reed, J. Michael
Rozek, J. C., R. J. Camp, and J. M. Reed. 2017. No evidence of critical slowing down in two endangered Hawaiian honeycreepers. PLOS ONE 12:e0187518. Available: http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0187518

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Year Published: 2017

Assessing the potential of translocating vulnerable forest birds by searching for novel and enduring climatic ranges

Hawaiian forest birds are imperiled, with fewer than half the original >40 species remaining extant. Recent studies document ongoing rapid population decline and pro- ject complete climate-based range losses for the critically endangered Kaua’i endemics ‘akeke’e (Loxops caeruleirostris) and ‘akikiki (Oreomystis bairdi) by end-of-century due to...

Fortini, Lucas B.; Kaiser, Lauren R.; Vorsino, Adam E.; Paxton, Eben H.; Jacobi, James D.
Fortini, L. B., L. R. Kaiser, A. E. Vorsino, E. H. Paxton, and J. D. Jacobi. 2017. Assessing the potential of translocating vulnerable forest birds by searching for novel and enduring climatic ranges. Ecology and Evolution 7:9119–9130. Available: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.3451/full

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Year Published: 2017

Monitoring eradication of European mouflon sheep from the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park

European mouflon (Ovis gmelini musimon), the world's smallest wild sheep, have proliferated and degraded fragile native ecosystems in the Hawaiian Islands through browsing, bark stripping, and trampling, including native forests within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park (HAVO). HAVO resource managers initiated ungulate control efforts in the 469 km2...

Judge, Seth; Hess, Steven C.; Faford, Jonathan K.; Pacheco, Dexter; Leopold, Christina
Judge, S. W., S. C. Hess, J. K. Faford, D. Pacheco, and C. R. Leopold. 2017. Monitoring eradication of European mouflon sheep from the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Pacific Science 71:425–436. Available: http://www.bioone.org/doi/full/10.2984/71.4.3

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Year Published: 2017

Ecosystem vs. community recovery 25 years after grass invasions and fire in a subtropical woodland

Despite a large body of research documenting invasive plant impacts, few studies have followed individual invaded sites over decades to observe how they change, and none have contrasted how compositional impacts from invasion compare to ecosystem-process impacts over a multi-decadal time-scale. Using direct measurements of plant density and...

D'Antonio, Carla M.; Yelenik, Stephanie G.; Mack, Michelle C.
D'Antonio, C. M., S. G. Yelenik, and M. C. Mack. 2017. Ecosystem vs. community recovery 25 years after grass invasions and fire in a subtropical woodland. Journal of Ecology 105:1462–1474.

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Year Published: 2017

Program MAMO: Models for avian management optimization-user guide

The following chapters describe the structure and code of MAMO, and walk the reader through running the different components of the program with sample data. This manual should be used alongside a computer running R, so that the reader can copy and paste code into R, observe the output, and follow along interactively. Taken together, chapters 2–4...

Guillaumet, Alban; Paxton, Eben H.
Guillaumet, A., and E. H. Paxton. 2017. Program MAMO: Models for avian management optimization-user guide. Hawai`i Cooperative Studies Unit Technical Report HCSU-TR077, University of Hawai'i at Hilo, Hilo, Hawai‘i. Available: http://hdl.handle.net/10790/3312.

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Year Published: 2017

Shifts in an invasive rodent community favoring black rats (Rattus rattus) following restoration of native forest

One potential, unintended ecological consequence accompanying forest restoration is a shift in invasive animal populations, potentially impacting conservation targets. Eighteen years after initial restoration (ungulate exclusion, invasive plant control, and out planting native species) at a 4 ha site on Maui, Hawai'i, we compared invasive rodent...

Shiels, Aaron B.; Medeiros, Arthur C.; von Allmen, Erica I.
Shiels, A. B., A. C. Medeiros, and E. I. von Allmen. 2017. Shifts in an invasive rodent community favoring Black rats (Rattus rattus) following restoration of native forest. Restoration Ecology 25:759–767. Available: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/rec.12494/full

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Year Published: 2017

The influence of soil resources and plant traits on invasion and restoration in a subtropical woodland

It has been shown in some cases that nitrogen (N) addition to soil will increase abundance of plant invaders because many invaders have traits that promote rapid growth in response to high resource supply. Similarly, it has been suggested, and sometimes shown, that decreasing soil N via carbon (C) additions can facilitate native species recovery....

Yelenik, Stephanie G.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; August-Schmidt, Elizabeth
Yelenik, S. G., C. M. D’Antonio, and E. August-Schmidt. 2017. The influence of soil resources and plant traits on invasion and restoration in a subtropical woodland. Plant Ecology 218:1149–1161. Available: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11258-017-0757-3

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Year Published: 2017

Biogeographical variation of plumage coloration in the sexually dichromatic Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi (Chlorodrepanis virens)

Plumage coloration in birds can be of major importance to mate selection, social signaling, or predator avoidance. Variations in plumage coloration related to sex, age class, or seasons have been widely studied, but the effect of other factors such as climate is less known. In this study, we examine how carotenoid-based plumage coloration and...

Gaudioso-Levita, Jacqueline M.; Hart, Patrick J.; Lapointe, Dennis; Veillet, Anne; Sebastian-Gonzalez, Esther
Gaudioso-Levita, J. M., P. J. Hart, D. A. LaPointe, A. C. Veillet, and E. Sebastián-González. 2017. Biogeographical variation of plumage coloration in the sexually dichromatic Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi (Chlorodrepanis virens). Journal of Ornithology 158:955–964.

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Year Published: 2017

Do you hear what I see? Vocalization relative to visual detection rates of Hawaiian hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus semotus)

Bats vocalize during flight as part of the sensory modality called echolocation, but very little is known about whether flying bats consistently call. Occasional vocal silence during flight when bats approach prey or conspecifics has been documented for relatively few species and situations. Bats flying alone in clutter-free airspace are not known...

Gorresen, Paulo Marcos; Cryan, Paul; Montoya-Aiona, Kristina; Bonaccorso, Frank
Gorresen, P. M., P. M. Cryan, K. Montoya-Aiona, and F. J. Bonaccorso. 2017. Do you hear what I see? Vocalization relative to visual detection rates of Hawaiian hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus semotus). Ecology and Evolution 7:6669–6679. Available: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.3196/full

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Year Published: 2017

Survivorship across the annual cycle of a migratory passerine, the willow flycatcher

Annual survivorship in migratory birds is a product of survival across the different periods of the annual cycle (i.e. breeding, wintering, and migration), and may vary substantially among these periods. Determining which periods have the highest mortality, and thus are potentially limiting a population, is important especially for species of...

Paxton, Eben H.; Durst, Scott L.; Sogge, Mark K.; Koronkiewicz, Thomas J.; Paxton, Kristina L.
Paxton, E. H., S. L. Durst, M. K. Sogge, T. J. Koronkiewicz, and K. L. Paxton. 2017. Survivorship across the annual cycle of a migratory passerine, the willow flycatcher. Journal of Avian Biology 48:1126–1131. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jav.01371

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Year Published: 2017

Hawai`i forest bird monitoring database: Database dictionary

Between 1976 and 1981, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (now U.S. Geological Survey – Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center [USGS-PIERC]) conducted systematic surveys of forest birds and plant communities on all the main Hawaiian Islands, except O‘ahu, as part of the Hawai‘i Forest Bird Surveys (HFBS). Results of this monumental effort have...

Camp, Richard J.; Genz, Ayesha
Camp, R. J., and A. S. Genz. 2017. Hawai‘i Forest Bird Monitoring Database: database dictionary. Hawai`i Cooperative Studies Unit Technical Report HCSU-TR039, University of Hawai'i at Hilo, Hilo, Hawai‘i. Available: http://hdl.handle.net/10790/3311.

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Year Published: 2017

Lessons from the Tōhoku tsunami: A model for island avifauna conservation prioritization

Earthquake-generated tsunamis threaten coastal areas and low-lying islands with sudden flooding. Although human hazards and infrastructure damage have been well documented for tsunamis in recent decades, the effects on wildlife communities rarely have been quantified. We describe a tsunami that hit the world's largest remaining tropical seabird...

Reynolds, Michelle H.; Berkowitz, Paul; Klavitter, John; Courtot, Karen
Reynolds, M. H., P. Berkowitz, J. L. Klavitter, and K. N. Courtot. 2017. Lessons from the Tōhoku tsunami: A model for island avifauna conservation prioritization. Ecology and Evolution 7:5873–5890. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ece3.3092