Optimizing satellite resources for the global assessment and mitigation of volcanic hazards

Science Center Objects

A vast number of the world’s volcanoes are unmonitored by ground-based sensors, yet constitute an important hazard to nearby residents and infrastructure, as well as air travel and the global economy. Satellite data provide a cost-effective means of tracking activity at such volcanoes. Unfortunately, satellite acquisitions are not optimized for application to volcano hazards, in part because ...

A vast number of the world’s volcanoes are unmonitored by ground-based sensors, yet constitute an important hazard to nearby residents and infrastructure, as well as air travel and the global economy.  Satellite data provide a cost-effective means of tracking activity at such volcanoes.  Unfortunately, satellite acquisitions are not optimized for application to volcano hazards, in part because clear relations between satellite-monitored unrest and eruptive activity are lacking. We aim to bridge this gap by developing linked global databases of satellite observations of volcanic activity, with the goal of relating surface change and volcanic emissions to eruption style and impact.  This database (or databases) will be used to design an acquisition strategy that can be shared with international space agencies to optimize the use of satellite data in volcanic hazards assessment and mitigation.  While there are several international efforts to address this problem, our Powell Center Working Group is uniquely able to bring these programs together to work synergistically.



Working Group Webpage

Publications

Furtney, M. A., M. E. Pritchard, S. K. Ebmeier, J. A. Jay, S. A. Carn, B. T. McCormick and K. Reath (2018) Synthesizing multi-sensor, multi-satellite, multi-decadal data sets for global volcano monitoring, Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 365, p. 38-56, doi: 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2018.10.002

Poland, M.P., Lopez, T., Wright, R. et al. Forecasting, Detecting, and Tracking Volcanic Eruptions from Space. Remote Sens Earth Syst Sci (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s41976-020-00034-x [email for PDF]

Pritchard, M. E., J. Biggs, C. Wauthier, E. Sansosti, D. W. D. Arnold, F. Delgado, S. K. Ebmeier, S. T. Henderson, K. Stephens, C. Cooper, K. Wnuk, F. Amelung, V. Aguilar, P. Mothes, O. Macedo, L. E. Lara, M. P. Poland, and S. Zoffoli (2018) Towards coordinated regional multi-satellite InSAR volcano observations: Results from the Latin America pilot project, Journal of Applied Volcanology, 7, https://doi.org/10.1186/s13617-018-0074-0

Reath, K., Pritchard, M., Poland, M., Delgado, F., Carn, S., Coppola, D., et al. (2019). Thermal, deformation, and degassing remote sensing time series (CE 2000-2017) at the 47 most active volcanoes in Latin America: Implications for volcanic systems. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 124. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018JB016199 Article highlighted in EOS research spotlight.

Reath, K., M. E. Pritchard, S. Moruzzi, A. Alcott, D. Coppola, and D. Pieri. “The AVTOD (ASTER Volcanic Thermal Output Database) Latin America Archive.” Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 376 (May 1, 2019): 62–74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2019.03.019.

Reath, K., Pritchard, M., Biggs, J.,Andrews, B., Ebmeier, S. K., Bagnardi,M., et al. (2020 ). Using conceptualmodels to relate multiparametersatellite data to subsurface volcanicprocesses in Latin America.Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems,21, e2019GC008494. https://doi.org/10.1029/2019GC008494

working group photo



Principal Investigator(s):

Matthew Pritchard (Cornell University)

Michael P Poland (USGS Volcano Science Center)

Kevin Reath (Cornell University)

Participant(s):

Mary E Rumpf (United States Geological Survey)

Paul Lundgren (NASA - Jet Propulsion Laboratory)

Ben Andrews (Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History)

Simon Carn (Michigan Tech)

Robert Wright (University of Hawaii)

Christelle Wauthier (Penn State)

Taryn Lopez (University of Alaska Fairbanks)

Peter Webley (University of Alaska Fairbanks)

Juliet Biggs (University of Bristol)

Rick Wessels (USGS)

Sue Loughlin (British Geological Survey)

Marco Bagnardi (NASA JPL and Goddard)

Mike Pavolonis (NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service)

Susanna Ebmeier (University of Leeds)

Julie Griswold (USGS)

Sarah Ogburn (USGS)

Társilo Girona (NASA JPL)

Kyle Anderson (USGS)

Grace Bato (NASA JPL)

Alberto Roman (NASA JPL)