St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center

Data and Tools

Filter Total Items: 605
Date published: August 28, 2017

DRASTIC model results for Upper Floridan aquifer vulnerability to Bromacil and Ethylene Dibromide

This dataset includes DRASTIC (Aller and others, 1987) model results for Upper Floridan aquifer vulnerability to contamination. The DRASTIC value serves as an intrinsic vulnerability index for assessing the transport of contaminants from the surface. The DRASTIC model setup requires the input of raster data for depth to groundwater, aquifer recharge, aquifer media, soil media, topog

Date published: August 28, 2017

Wetland-Change Data Derived from Landsat Imagery, Assateague Island to Metompkin Island, Maryland and Virginia, 1984 to 2015: Wetland Persistence Analysis

This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data release includes geospatial datasets that were created for the analysis of Virginia and Maryland Atlantic coastal wetland changes over time. Wetland change was determined by assessing two metrics: wetland persistence and land-cover switching. Because seasonal water levels, beach width, and vegetation differences can affect change analyses, only

Date published: August 28, 2017

Wetland-Change Data Derived from Landsat Imagery, Assateague Island to Metompkin Island, Maryland and Virginia, 1984 to 2015: Land-cover Change Analysis

This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data release includes geospatial datasets that were created for the analysis of Virginia and Maryland Atlantic coastal wetland changes over time. Wetland change was determined by assessing two metrics: wetland persistence and land-cover switching. Because seasonal water levels, beach width, and vegetation differences can affect change analyses, only

Date published: August 24, 2017

Coastal Change Hazards Portal

Interactive access to coastal change science and data for our Nation’s coasts. Information and products are organized within three coastal change hazard themes: 1) extreme storms, 2) shoreline change, and 3) sea-level rise. Displays probabilities of coastal erosion.

Date published: August 19, 2017

2014–2015 Ocean Current and Pressure Time Series Data from the Upper Florida Keys: Crocker Reef, FL

Three Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP), a current meter and a pressure logger were deployed at Crocker Reef, a senile (dead) barrier reef located in the northern portion of the Florida Reef Tract from December 12, 2014 to January 30, 2015 to quantify flow characteristics in various sub-regions. Two SonTek Argonaut-XR current profilers were deployed on the reef flat and

Date published: August 19, 2017

2014¬–2015 Ocean Current and Pressure Time Series Data from the Upper Florida Keys: Crocker Reef, FL

Three Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP), a current meter and a pressure logger were deployed at Crocker Reef, a senile (dead) barrier reef located in the northern portion of the Florida Reef Tract from December 12, 2014 to January 30, 2015 to quantify flow characteristics in various sub-regions. Two SonTek Argonaut-XR current profilers were deployed on the reef flat and

Date published: August 12, 2017

Beach Topography—Fire Island, New York, Pre-Hurricane Sandy, January 2012: Ground Based Lidar (ASCII XYZ Point Data)

The U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (USGS-SPCMSC) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility (USACE-FRF) of Duck, North Carolina collaborated to gather alongshore ground-based lidar beach topography at Fire Island, New York. This high-resolution, elevation dataset was collected on January 30, 2012, and was funded by SPCM

Date published: August 12, 2017

Beach Topography—Fire Island, New York, Pre-Hurricane Sandy, January 2012: Ground Based Lidar (1-Meter Digital Elevation Model)

The U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (USGS-SPCMSC) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility (USACE-FRF) of Duck, North Carolina collaborated to gather alongshore ground-based lidar beach topography at Fire Island, New York. This high-resolution, elevation dataset was collected on January 30, 2012, and was funded by SPCM

Date published: August 12, 2017

Beach Topography—Fire Island, New York, Pre-Hurricane Sandy, January 2012: Ground Based Lidar (1-Meter Digital Elevation Model)

The U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (USGS-SPCMSC) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility (USACE-FRF) of Duck, North Carolina collaborated to gather alongshore ground-based lidar beach topography at Fire Island, New York. This high-resolution, elevation dataset was collected on January 30, 2012, and was funded by SPCM

Date published: August 12, 2017

Beach Topography—Fire Island, New York, Pre-Hurricane Sandy, January 2012: Ground Based Lidar (ASCII XYZ Point Data)

The U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (USGS-SPCMSC) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Field Research Facility (USACE-FRF) of Duck, North Carolina collaborated to gather alongshore ground-based lidar beach topography at Fire Island, New York. This high-resolution, elevation dataset was collected on January 30, 2012, and was funded by SPCM

Date published: August 11, 2017

Ground-Based Lidar Beach Topography of Fire Island, New York, January 2012

This high-resolution elevation dataset was collected on January 30, 2012 and extends along 31 kilometers (km) of Fire Island, NY beach, stretching from the eastern boundary of Robert Moses State Park to the Otis Pike Wilderness Area near Hospital Island, approximately 1.25km east of the Wilderness Breach and approximately 1.5km west of the Fire Island Wilderness Visitor Center. 

Date published: August 9, 2017

Shoreline Change Rates for Barnegat and Great Bay, NJ: 1839 to 2012 (ver 1.1, December 2017)

This dataset represents shoreline change rates for the New Jersey coastline (Point Pleasant, NJ to Longport, NJ) from 1839 to 2012. Shoreline data were obtained from multiple data sources, including the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP). Datasets were compil