Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center

Threatened and Endangered Species

Filter Total Items: 14
Date published: July 8, 2021
Status: Active

Evaluate Propagation Efforts and Determine Dispersal Patterns for Quadrula fragosa from Tagged, Artificially Infested Host Fish (Ictalurus punctatus) in the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway (SACN)

The Winged Mapleleaf mussel (Quadrula fragosa) is only known to inhabit five locations in the U.S., and the population in the St. Croix National Scenic Riverway is isolated both physically and genetically from the other populations. In 2000, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) issued Reasonable and Prudent Measures, which required the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to...

Date published: July 8, 2021
Status: Active

Improving Survival of Juvenile Winged Mapleleaf Mussels (Quadrula fragosa) Through Identification of Host Fish Overwintering Areas

The St. Croix National Scenic Riverway (SACN) is one of the last refuges for rapidly declining populations of native unionid mussels in the United States and supports the only known self-sustaining population of the federally endangered Winged Mapleleaf mussel (Quadrula fragosa) in the upper Mississippi River basin. The Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) is the only known...

Date published: July 29, 2020
Status: Active

Decision-support tool for managing endangered species in the face of uncertainty

Along the Santa Clara River in California, populations of the federally and state-listed Least Bell's Vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus) are recovering from near extirpation. Habitat protection and restoration, as well as reducing brood parasitism by Brown-headed Cowbirds (...

Contacts: Jessica C Stanton, Wayne E Thogmartin, Ph.D., Barbara Kus, Jenny Marek, Eric Morrissette, Linnea S. Hall, Allison Alvarado, Bruce K. Orr, Laura Riege
Date published: May 29, 2020
Status: Active

Development of Sampling Protocols and Diagnostic Tools for Assessment of Freshwater Mussel Health

Assessing Impacts of Emerging and Established Diseases to Aquatic Ecosystems

The role of disease in freshwater mussel declines has been largely ignored due to the lack of appropriate diagnostic tools....

Contacts: Diane Waller
Date published: May 29, 2020
Status: Active

Assessing Impacts of Emerging and Established Diseases to Aquatic Ecosystems

Native freshwater mussels play a critical role in aquatic environments and are considered “ecosystem engineers” and indicators of water quality by constantly filtering water. Populations of native freshwater mussels have declined in recent years, and this decline has been attributed to factors such as habitat degradation, pollution, and invasive species, among others. The importance of these...

Contacts: Diane Waller
Date published: May 29, 2020
Status: Active

Investigation Into Mass Mussel Die-off Events

Assessing Impacts of Emerging and Established Diseases to Aquatic Ecosystems

The decline of native freshwater mussels has the potential to devastate aquatic communities. Although factors such as habitat...

Contacts: Diane Waller
Date published: May 29, 2020
Status: Active

Development of Selective Control Tools

Management Tools for Dreissenid Mussels

Currently, dreissenid mussel populations are spreading and becoming a growing problem in many aquatic systems, making it important to find management techniques that are selective for the invasive...

Contacts: Diane Waller
Date published: April 16, 2020
Status: Active

Bat Research

White-nose syndrome (WNS) caused by the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) has decimated hibernating bat populations across North America since it emerged 10 years ago in New York. As Pd has spread across North America, infection dynamics and mortality from WNS have varied among species and across sites. The mechanisms behind vulnerability of species across the current...

Date published: April 16, 2020
Status: Active

Integrating colony counts with NABat acoustic data to reveal the true impacts of White-Nose Syndrome on northern long-eared bats

Bat Research

Research collaboration: Brian Reichert (FORT), Wayne Thogmartin (UMESC), Winifred Frick (Bat Conservation International), Tina Cheng (Bat Conservation International)

The northern long-eared bat...

Date published: April 16, 2020
Status: Active

A continental-scale study of acoustic phenology to improve population monitoring and inform management of hibernating bats

Bat Research

Research collaboration: Winifred Frick (Bat Conservation International), Theodore Weller (U.S. Forest Service), Wayne Thogmartin (UMESC), Craig Willis (University of Winnipeg), and Brian Reichert (FORT...

Date published: April 16, 2020
Status: Active

Modeling the response of cave hibernating Myotis species to white-nose syndrome mitigation tactics

Bat Research

Research collaboration: Robin Russell (NWHC), Tonie Rocke (NWHC), Wayne Thogmartin (UMESC), Evan Grant (PWRC)

White-nose syndrome is a fungal disease devastating cave-hibernating bat species (Myotis spp.) in the eastern...

Date published: April 16, 2020
Status: Active

Quantifying vulnerability of bat species to White-nose Syndrome across North America

Bat Research

Research collaboration: Winifred Frick (Bat Conservation International), Brian Reichert (FORT), Theodore Weller (US Forest Service), Wayne Thogmartin (UMESC) and the North American Bat Colony Count...