Science Center Objects

SUBASE Bangor is a 6,785 acre Navy installation located on Hood Canal in Kitsap County, Washington. Currently it serves as the home port to eight Ohio-class TRIDENT missile submarines, but historically the site served as a Naval Ammunition Depot. As a result of the historical activities at Bangor, numerous contaminated sites have been identified. Contaminants include ordnance chemicals, trace metals, chlorinated hydrocarbons, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's). The ground-water flow system at SUBASE Bangor is not understood well enough on a base-wide scale to effectively manage and plan the use of the resource.

A major problem is that the effects of contamination from hazardous-waste sites on the quality of the base-wide ground-water system are unknown because the base-wide ambient water-quality and flow system are not well known. Consequently, the potential effects of proposed and ongoing remedial activities are also unknown. Other base-wide ground water issues are centered on projected demands for ground water due to residential and commercial growth on and around Bangor.

9722-9F8 - Characterization of the Geohydrology, Ground-Water Flow System, and Ground-Water Quality of SUBASE Bangor, Kitsap County, Washington - Completed FY2003

Background - SUBASE Bangor is a 6,785 acre Navy installation located on Hood Canal in Kitsap County, Washington. Currently it serves as the home port to eight Ohio-class TRIDENT missile submarines, but historically the site served as a Naval Ammunition Depot. As a result of the historical activities at Bangor, numerous contaminated sites have been identified. Contaminants include ordnance chemicals, trace metals, chlorinated hydrocarbons, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB's). The ground-water flow system at SUBASE Bangor is not understood well enough on a base-wide scale to effectively manage and plan the use of the resource. A major problem is that the effects of contamination from hazardous-waste sites on the quality of the base-wide ground-water system are unknown because the base-wide ambient water-quality and flow system are not well known. Consequently, the potential effects of proposed and ongoing remedial activities are also unknown. Other base-wide ground water issues are centered on projected demands for ground water due to residential and commercial growth on and around Bangor. Developing large water supplies may induce seawater intrusion, alter recharge to deeper aquifers, lower ground-water levels, and/or decrease flow in streams and creeks. The magnitude of these impacts and the effects of such development on contaminant migration are unknown.

Objectives - A study is proposed with the broad objective of developing a better understanding of the ground-water flow system in order to effectively manage this important resource and to address existing ground-water protection and emerging ground-water supply issues.

Approach - This would be accomplished by; 1) defining the site geohydrologic framework; 2) defining the ambient ground-water chemistry; and 3) constructing a three-dimensional ground-water flow model to describe how future pumping scenarios will change ground-water levels, how these changes will affect the migration of contaminants on a regional scale, and what effects future pumping scenarios may have on the location of the freshwater/saltwater interface.

WA183 - Water Resources of the Kitsap Peninsula and Adjacent Islands - Completed FY1980

Problem - An influx of about 50,000 people is expected on the Kitsap Peninsula in the next few years as a result of the new Trident Nuclear Submarine Base. This development will require new water supplies, and may increase the potential for induced salt-water intrusion.

Objectives -

  • Make preliminary appraisal of water availability in main Trident impact area;
  • define aquifer location, extent, and characteristics; and
  • evaluate potential surface water supplies.

Approach - Phase I of this study (preliminary appraisal) will include utilization of the existing data on rainfall, evapotranspiration, water use, ground water, and surface water. Phase II of the investigation involves test drilling, geophysics (resistivity) and additional data collection. These data will be analyzed to determine the present water use, estimate the projected water use, and determine if the local ground-water resource will be adequate to meet the demands of the Trident development.