Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

Invasive Plants

An invasive species is an introduced species that has established itself and threatens the diversity and/or stability of a native species or environment. WARC researches the basic biology and environmental tolerances of these plant and animal species to provide resource managers with the ecological facts they need to help mitigate and control these problematic species. The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Program monitors, analyzes, and records sightings of non-native and invasive aquatic plant species throughout the United States, such as hydrilla and floating water hyacinth.
Filter Total Items: 2
Date published: August 2, 2018
Status: Active

Integrating Science and Management for Optimal Prevention and Control of Invasive Nymphoides in Florida

Two invasive species of floating hearts, Nymphoides cristata and N. indica, are actively managed in Florida. A rare native species, N. humboldtiana, has been found in Florida and verified by molecular methods; this species is nearly indistinguishable from N. indica.

Date published: April 11, 2016
Status: Active

Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Program

Welcome to the Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) information resource for the United States Geological Survey. Located at Gainesville, Florida, this site has been established as a central repository for spatially referenced biogeographic accounts of introduced aquatic species. The program provides scientific reports, online/realtime queries, spatial data sets, distribution maps, and general...