Great Lakes Aquatic Nuisance Species Information System

Science Center Objects

The Great Lakes Aquatic Nuisance Species Information System (GLANSIS) was developed by the NOAA Great Lakes Science Center to monitor nonindigenous aquatic species introductions into the Great Lakes region.

Great Lakes highlighted map

Great Lakes highlighted map

The Science Issue and Relevance: The threat of invasive species is ongoing in the Great Lakes region through both intentional (e.g. stocking, bait release, aquarium release) and unintentional (e.g. ballast water, hull fouling, canal) pathways. As the largest freshwater habitat in North America, the Great Lakes make up a diverse and critical ecosystem that is currently home to over 180 established nonindigenous species. The Great Lakes Aquatic Nuisance Species Information System (GLANSIS) was developed by the NOAA Great Lakes Science Center to monitor nonindigenous aquatic species introductions into the Great Lakes region and has partnered with the USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Program, which is a longstanding national database (nas.er.usgs.gov) of aquatic nuisance species occurrence information. This partnership has made these occurrence data more readily available to resource managers and the general public in the Great Lakes region. This partnership is a valid collaboration as NOAA possesses local biological expertise for the Great Lakes region and USGS has a database infrastructure in place to monitor and track nonindigenous species in a Geographic Information System.

Methodology for Addressing the Issue: GLANSIS is a Great Lakes specific node of the NAS Program. NOAA personnel working on the GLANSIS project assist the USGS by entering detailed Great Lakes occurrence records and species profile information into the NAS system, and in return the NAS Program provides a searchable, filtered view of the Great Lakes data to the GLANSIS website. The NAS Program has obtained funding from both the NOAA Invasive Species Program and the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative for maintenance of the GLANSIS website.

Future Steps: Searching for data, entering data, and reviewing NAS records are constant and ongoing objectives tasked to both NOAA and NAS staff. Due to limited and intermittent funding, further development of GLANSIS has been minimal and slow.

Related Projects: Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database and Website

Great Lakes Aquatic Nuisance Species Information System Banner

Great Lakes Aquatic Nuisance Species Information System Banner