Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

Invasive Species

Research, monitoring, and technology development for containment or eradication of non-indigenous species that have potential to cause significant ecologic or economic damage and those that impact human health. Scientists test and develop methods to better detect invasive species, determine the likelihood of their spread and impact, report distribution to track their spread, methods to contain and control harmful invasive species, as well as means to restore ecosystems after control efforts. Recent emphasis has been on using advanced technologies such as remote sensing and genetics methods to develop species-specific detection and control tools for terrestrial and aquatic species, with recent focus on Asian carp, sea lamprey, and snakes. Includes studies on ecologic impacts, invasion biology, and basic life history to help determine risk and develop control strategies.
Filter Total Items: 54
Date published: February 27, 2019
Status: Active

Effects of Native and Non-native Fishes on Native Apple Snail Population Dynamics

The Florida apple snail is a critical component of the state's wetland food webs. USGS scientists assess the effects of native and non-native fishes on the native snail populations.

Contacts: Pamela J Schofield, Ph.D., Daniel Slone, Ph.D., Philip C. Darby, Ph.D., Silvia M. Gutierre, Ph.D.
Date published: February 27, 2019
Status: Active

Development of a Quantitative Risk Assessment Tool to Predict Invasiveness of Non-native Freshwater Fishes in Everglades National Park

The introduction of non-native fishes is a problem across the United States, particularly in Florida. USGS scientists are developing a decision support tool to help natural resourece managers prioritize which species to focus prevention, detection, rapid response, and control efforts. 

Contacts: Pamela J Schofield, Ph.D., Daniel Slone, Ph.D., William F. Loftus, Jeff Kline
Date published: February 19, 2019
Status: Active

Risk Analysis of Invasive Freshwater Fishes in Hawaii and Micronesia

Invasive species threaten biodiversity around the world, especially on islands. USGS scientists are helping to identify fish species that have the greatest potential to invade the fresh waters of Microneisa. 

Date published: August 2, 2018
Status: Active

Integrating Science and Management for Optimal Prevention and Control of Invasive Nymphoides in Florida

Two invasive species of floating hearts, Nymphoides cristata and N. indica, are actively managed in Florida. A rare native species, N. humboldtiana, has been found in Florida and verified by molecular methods; this species is nearly indistinguishable from N. indica.

Date published: November 7, 2017
Status: Active

Fish Slam - November 2017

The Hunt For The Southernmost Snakehead. Thirty-one fishery biologists from eleven agencies participated in a two-day Fish Slam event. Thirty-five sites in Broward and Miami-Dade counties were sampled for non-native fishes.

Date published: August 1, 2017
Status: Active

Pilot Testing and Protocol Development of Apple Snail Suppression at Mandalay National Wildlife Refuge

The maculata apple snail (Pomacea maculata) has invaded many coastal and some inland areas in south Louisiana. Reports have indicated that the freshwater snails have significantly reduced the amount of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) and floating leaved vegetation (FLV) available for waterfowl and other wildlife.

Date published: March 22, 2017
Status: Completed

Spring Fish Slam 2017 – Big Cypress

22-23 March 2017 - Ten teams of fishery biologists sampled 28 sites amid unexpected wildfires in the Big Cypress National Preserve over the two day period. On the second day a reporter from the Miami Herald accompanied a ground crew team.

Date published: March 16, 2017
Status: Active

Florida Non-Native Fish Action Alliance

The Florida Non-Native Fish Action Alliance brings together federal and state agencies, academic institutions, and non-governmental organizations to address the need for documenting and managing the non-native fishes introduced to the state's waters.

Date published: November 1, 2016
Status: Completed

Fish Slam - Fall 2016

November 1 - 2, 2016 – Eight teams of fishery biologists from the US Geological Survey (USGS), US Fish and Wildlife Service - Peninsular Florida Fisheries Office and Welaka National Fish Hatchery (USFWS), the National Park Service (NPS), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Florida International University (FIU), and Zoo Miami sampled 20 sites for non-native fishes in Palm...

Date published: September 15, 2016

Determining the Efficacy of Agricultural Oils for Suppressing Applesnail Egg Mass Hatch-out

Maculata applesnails (Pomacea maculata) are exotic freshwater snails that have been widely introduced along the Gulf of Mexico coast. The snails can significantly impact freshwater macrophytes and reduce the quality of water bodies.

Date published: August 30, 2016
Status: Active

Developing Techniques for Estimating Nutria (Myocastor coypus) Abundance

Nutrias (Myocastor coypus) are an aquatic rodent imported from South America to the United States in the 1920-40’s for the fur farms. Since their original importation they have become established in the wild in many regions of the United States.

Date published: August 25, 2016

Movement of Maculata Applesnails in Southern Louisiana Swamps

Maculata applesnails (Pomacea maculata) are exotic freshwater snails that have been widely introduced along the Gulf of Mexico coast. They can significantly impact freshwater macrophytes and reduce water quality.