Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

Invasive Species

Research, monitoring, and technology development for containment or eradication of non-indigenous species that have potential to cause significant ecologic or economic damage and those that impact human health. Scientists test and develop methods to better detect invasive species, determine the likelihood of their spread and impact, report distribution to track their spread, methods to contain and control harmful invasive species, as well as means to restore ecosystems after control efforts. Recent emphasis has been on using advanced technologies such as remote sensing and genetics methods to develop species-specific detection and control tools for terrestrial and aquatic species, with recent focus on Asian carp, sea lamprey, and snakes. Includes studies on ecologic impacts, invasion biology, and basic life history to help determine risk and develop control strategies.
Filter Total Items: 60
Date published: May 11, 2016
Status: Active

Assessment of Small Mammal Demographics and Communities in Everglades National Park

The decline of mammal populations in Everglades National Park (ENP) over the last 20 years is likely to influence the ecology of the Everglades system and the likelihood of successful Everglades restoration.

Date published: May 6, 2016
Status: Active

Optimal Control Strategies for Invasive Exotics in South Florida

The establishment and proliferation of exotic plants and animals can interfere with native ecological processes and can cause severe stress to sensitive ecosystems.

Date published: May 2, 2016
Status: Active

Lionfish Distribution, Geographic Spread, Biology, and Ecology

Many aspects of lionfish biology are studied at the USGS Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.  As part of the U.S. Geological Survey Nonindigenous Aquatic Species database, the distribution of lionfish is tracked over time.

Date published: May 2, 2016
Status: Active

Impacts of Non-Native Fishes in the Florida Everglades

The Florida Everglades is the largest wetland ecosystem in the United States and supports a diverse flora and fauna, including many rare species.

Date published: April 29, 2016

A Novel Technique to Control Invasive Species – Trojan Y

In this project, USGS scientists are developing a new genetic technique – Trojan Y – to help eradicate invasive species. Although the methodology has been well-developed in theory, this is the first test of its practical application.

Date published: April 26, 2016

Trojan Y Invasive Species Control - Sex Marker Identification

To control or possibly eliminate non-native species without harm to native fauna, a genetic technique using sex-reversed females with two Y chromosomes (Trojan Y) is being developed to reduce the breeding success of the species, ultimately resulting in population decline or loss.

Date published: April 25, 2016
Status: Active

Great Lakes Aquatic Nuisance Species Information System

The Great Lakes Aquatic Nuisance Species Information System (GLANSIS) was developed by the NOAA Great Lakes Science Center to monitor nonindigenous aquatic species introductions into the Great Lakes region.

Date published: April 17, 2016

Parasites of Imported and Non-Native Wild Asian Swamp Eels

In parts of Asia, wild-caught and aquaculture-reared swamp eels are widely consumed as food by humans and are a common source of human gnathostomiasis, a food-borne zoonosis caused by parasitic nematodes of the genus Gnathostoma spp. In humans, the larvae of these nematodes can cause tissue damage and, in some instances, death. Over the past two decades, many thousands of Asian swamp eels have...

Contacts: Leo Nico, Ph.D.
Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Development of an Environmental Assessment and Eradication Plan to Remove Tilapia from Ponds and Wetlands in National Parks on the Island of Hawai’i

Mozambique tilapia, a highly invasive non-native fish of the family Cichlidae, were discovered in a wetland in Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park on the Big Island of Hawai'i. As the U.S. National Park Service works to restore the natural communities and functions of wetland ecosystems on the island, the eradication of the tilapia population is considered necessary to fully achieve...

Contacts: Leo Nico, Ph.D.
Date published: April 16, 2016
Status: Active

Determining the Ploidy and Resultant Reproductive Capability of Artificially Spawned and Wild Caught Asian Carp

The invasive grass carp and black carp are artificially spawned to produce triploids, which means they have three sets of chromosomes and are sterile. WARC scientists invented an early ploidy prediction process for produced fry, and a post-mortem assessment method for carp caught either in the wild or sold and hauled live to other states. 

Date published: April 16, 2016
Status: Active

Asian Tiger Shrimp Distribution and Genetics

The Asian tiger shrimp began appearing in commercial shrimp catches in 2006. They grow larger than native shrimp and are known to be fierce predators - so shrimpers and managers are concerned about the potential effects this species might have. 

Date published: April 11, 2016
Status: Active

Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Program

Welcome to the Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) information resource for the United States Geological Survey. Located at Gainesville, Florida, this site has been established as a central repository for spatially referenced biogeographic accounts of introduced aquatic species. The program provides scientific reports, online/realtime queries, spatial data sets, distribution maps, and general...