Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

Invasive Species

Research, monitoring, and technology development for containment or eradication of non-indigenous species that have potential to cause significant ecologic or economic damage and those that impact human health. Scientists test and develop methods to better detect invasive species, determine the likelihood of their spread and impact, report distribution to track their spread, methods to contain and control harmful invasive species, as well as means to restore ecosystems after control efforts. Recent emphasis has been on using advanced technologies such as remote sensing and genetics methods to develop species-specific detection and control tools for terrestrial and aquatic species, with recent focus on Asian carp, sea lamprey, and snakes. Includes studies on ecologic impacts, invasion biology, and basic life history to help determine risk and develop control strategies.
Filter Total Items: 54
Date published: April 25, 2016
Status: Active

Great Lakes Aquatic Nuisance Species Information System

The Great Lakes Aquatic Nuisance Species Information System (GLANSIS) was developed by the NOAA Great Lakes Science Center to monitor nonindigenous aquatic species introductions into the Great Lakes region.

Date published: April 17, 2016

Parasites of Imported and Non-Native Wild Asian Swamp Eels

In parts of Asia, wild-caught and aquaculture-reared swamp eels are widely consumed as food by humans and are a common source of human gnathostomiasis, a food-borne zoonosis caused by parasitic nematodes of the genus Gnathostoma spp. In humans, the larvae of these nematodes can cause tissue damage and, in some instances, death. Over the past two decades, many thousands of Asian swamp eels have...

Contacts: Leo Nico, Ph.D.
Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Development of an Environmental Assessment and Eradication Plan to Remove Tilapia from Ponds and Wetlands in National Parks on the Island of Hawai’i

Mozambique tilapia, a highly invasive non-native fish of the family Cichlidae, were discovered in a wetland in Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park on the Big Island of Hawai'i. As the U.S. National Park Service works to restore the natural communities and functions of wetland ecosystems on the island, the eradication of the tilapia population is considered necessary to fully achieve...

Contacts: Leo Nico, Ph.D.
Date published: April 16, 2016
Status: Active

Determining the Ploidy and Resultant Reproductive Capability of Artificially Spawned and Wild Caught Asian Carp

The invasive grass carp and black carp are artificially spawned to produce triploids, which means they have three sets of chromosomes and are sterile. WARC scientists invented an early ploidy prediction process for produced fry, and a post-mortem assessment method for carp caught either in the wild or sold and hauled live to other states. 

Date published: April 16, 2016
Status: Active

Asian Tiger Shrimp Distribution and Genetics

The Asian tiger shrimp began appearing in commercial shrimp catches in 2006. They grow larger than native shrimp and are known to be fierce predators - so shrimpers and managers are concerned about the potential effects this species might have. 

Date published: April 11, 2016
Status: Active

Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Program

Welcome to the Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) information resource for the United States Geological Survey. Located at Gainesville, Florida, this site has been established as a central repository for spatially referenced biogeographic accounts of introduced aquatic species. The program provides scientific reports, online/realtime queries, spatial data sets, distribution maps, and general...

Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Developing Detection Probabilities and Quantifying the Effects of Flowing Water to Improve Asian Carp Environmental DNA (eDNA) Surveys

Invasive Asian carp are problematic for native species, and managers are implementing control measures without well-quantified detection limits or a means to assess the accuracy and precision of existing or future survey data for the fish. Environmental DNA - eDNA - is already used to detect the presence of invasive species, and can be used to identify locations to focus carp control efforts...

Date published: April 6, 2016
Status: Active

Efficacy of eDNA as an Early Detection and Rapid Response Indicator for Burmese Pythons in the Northern Greater Everglades Ecosystem

Traditional approaches to locating Burmese pythons - including visual searches and trapping - have resulted in low detection. Environmental DNA - or eDNA - is increasingly being used to detect the presence of non-native species, particularly when traditional methods may not be adequate. 

Date published: April 6, 2016
Status: Active

Genetic Analysis of the Invasive Burmese Python to Aid Management and Population-Control Decision-Making

Invasive Burmese pythons threaten the success of Everglades restoration efforts. To assist with management and population control decision making, USGS scientists are implementing genetic studies to identify potential new entry pathways and to help quantify the size of the breeding population.

Date published: April 5, 2016
Status: Active

Genetic Analysis of Wild and Captive Black Carp in the Mississippi River Basin

Black carp have likely been present in the Mississippi River since the 1990s, but their current distribution and spread is not well understood. Genetics is helping to shed light on this species, including its diversity, the relatedness of wild and captive fish, and its introduction history. 

Date published: March 30, 2016
Status: Active

Evaluation of Tegu Movements and Habitat Use in Relation to Location and Habitat

Tegus are breeding, they have a diverse diet, and they are established in areas throughout South Florida. USGS is tracking this problematic reptile species to better understand their movements and habitat use to help managers prevent dispersal into new areas.

Date published: March 22, 2016
Status: Active

Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database and Website (NAS)

Nonindigenous - non-native - species threaten biodiversity, but the distribution of these species is not well-known. The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) database tracks occurrence data on non-native aquatic plant and animal species throughout the United States, and provides the public with species profiles, distribution maps, and online/real-time queries for state/hydrologic basin-...