Western Fisheries Research Center

Publications

Filter Total Items: 2,280
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Year Published: 1952

An interim report on gill disease

GILL DISEASE among fish, a disease which is characterized by a proliferation of the gill epithelium, has been attributed to a number of different causes. Generally, there are two recognized types: the eastern or bacterial type, in which long filamentous bacteria can always be demonstrated; and the western type, in which, by definition, bacteria...

Rucker, R.R.; Johnson, H.E.; Kaydas, G.M.

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Year Published: 1950

Pollution in the lower Columbia Basin in 1948 with particular reference to the Willamette River

Development of the salmon resources of the lower Columbia River Basin appears as sound insurance against the threat of a serious reduction in the runs to the upper river areas through the multiple-purpose programs of water development now under way by the Corps of Engineers, the Bureau of Reclamation, and private interests. Any comprehensive plan...

Fish, F.F.; Rucker, R.R.

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Year Published: 1949

A streptomycete pathogenic to fish

A streptomycete and pseutdomonad were isolated from blueback salmon, Oncorhynchuis nerka (WValbaum), and shown to be pathogenic to fish. Trhese organisms were isolated from young blueback salmon taken from a gr'oup that developed an increasing mortality after feeding about a month at the United States Fishery Station, Leavenworth, Washington. A...

Rucker, R.R.

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Year Published: 1949

An investigation of the bactericidal action and fish toxicity of two homologous series of quaternary ammonium compounds

Bacterial gill disease when uncontrolled causes heavy losses among hatchery fish. The disease is characterized by a proliferation of the gill epithelium overlaid with masses of myxobacteria. The characteristic hyperplasia probably causes death by preventing the proper interchange of gases between the water and the blood stream of the fish. A...

Rucker, R.R.

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Year Published: 1949

Fact and fiction in spawntaking: Addenda

I was glad to see "Fact and Fiction in Spawntaking" by Wood and Dunn (1948) in a recent issue of the PROGRESSIVE FISH CULTURIST. Having spent two seasons at the Yellowstone Park station, I also attempted to find ways of increasing the efficiency of fertilization and several years ago conducted a few experiments along these lines. From these...

Rucker, R.R.

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Year Published: 1948

A report upon the Grand Coulee Fish Maintenance Project 1939-1947

The construction or Grand Coulee Dam, on the upper Columbia River, involved the loss of 1,140 lineal miles of spawning and rearing stream to the production of anadromous fishes. The fact that the annual value of these fish runs to the nation was estimated at $250,000 justified reasonable expenditures to assure their perpetuation. It was found...

Fish, F.F.; Hanavan, Mitchell G.

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Year Published: 1948

New compounds for the control of bacterial gill disease

BACTERIAL GILL DISEASE, a common epizootic among hatchery fish, can be controlled by copper sulphate dips, as stated by Davis (1945), or by prolonged treatments with Roccal, as noted by Fish (1947). The use of copper sulphate is not without danger because of variation in toxicity according to the hardness of the particular water supply; also, the...

Rucker, R.R.

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Year Published: 1948

The return on the blueback salmon to the Columbia River

THE year 1941 was a crucial one for the blueback salmon of the Columbia River. During that year, one brood came closer to extinction than was realized by more than a few individuals. The immediate causes were not overfishing, hydroelectric power development, or irrigation—although these factors continued to exert their long-standing effects...

Fisher, Frederick S.

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Year Published: 1948

Removal of excess nitrogen in a hatchery water supply

The water system at the U. S. Fish Cultural Station, Leavenworth, Washington, has been supplemented with two wells that were to be used to increase the temperature of the water during the winter and to cool the Water in the summer if necessary. The well water proved to be unsuitable for hatchery purposes because it was supersaturated with nitrogen...

Rucker, R.R.

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Year Published: 1947

Disease control in hatchery fish

A direct method for controlling diseases among hatchery fish has long been sought as an alternative to the earlier technique of hand dipping.  A  simple, practical, effective method of direct pond treatment not only obviates all need for handling fish weakened by disease, but it would materially reduce the time and effort required by...

Fish, F.F.

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Year Published: 1945

Columnaris as a disease of cold-water fishes

A natural outbreak of columnaris disease among wild adult and hatchery-reared fingerling salmon in the State of Washington is described. The disease is identified by the recovery of the causative organism, Bacillus columnaris Davis, which may be readily identified by its characteristic action in forming columns on the surfaces of infected material...