Wisconsin Water Science Center

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Since 1906, the Wisconsin Water Science Center has been collecting high-quality hydrologic data and conducting unbiased, scientifically sound research on Wisconsin's water resources. We strive to meet the changing needs of those who use our information—from the distribution, availability, and quality of our water resources to topic-oriented research that addresses current hydrological issues.

Current Wisconsin Water Conditions

Current Wisconsin Water Conditions

Explore real-time Wisconsin streamflow, groundwater, and water-quality conditions and access data with our new interactive map application.

View current water conditions

Feature: Nutrient reduction through leaf collection

Feature: Nutrient reduction through leaf collection

Can residential leaf collection and street sweeping reduce the amount of nutrients entering local streams and lakes?

Find out

News

Great Lakes
February 7, 2018

A new water-quality monitoring program, established by the U.S. Geological Survey, can provide scientists and managers with the best available data to help evaluate the health of Great Lakes ecosystems and improve water quality for recreation and commercial fishing.

Little Plover River Wells
April 6, 2017

Both irrigation wells and municipal wells affect flows in the Little Plover River near Plover, Wisconsin, stretches of which ran dry in past years, according to a new scientific report.

River with blue reflection, in late summer, leaves just starting to turn from green to gold.
March 2, 2017

Human and bovine, or cattle, viruses were detected in a small percentage of some Great Lakes Basin streams, with human viruses more prevalent in urban streams and bovine viruses more common in streams in agricultural areas, according to a recent U.S. Geological Survey-led study.

Publications

Year Published: 2018

U.S. Geological Survey continuous monitoring workshop—Workshop summary report

Executive SummaryThe collection of high-frequency (in other words, “continuous”) water data has been made easier over the years because of advances in technologies to measure, transmit, store, and query large, temporally dense datasets. Commercially available, in-situ sensors and data-collection platforms—together with new techniques for data...

Sullivan, Daniel J.; Joiner, John K.; Caslow, Kerry A.; Landers, Mark N.; Pellerin, Brian A.; Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Sheets, Rodney A.
Sullivan, D.J., Joiner, J.K., Caslow, K.A., Landers, M.N., Pellerin, B.A., Rasmussen, P.P., and Sheets, R.A., 2018, U.S. Geological Survey continuous monitoring workshop—Workshop summary report: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2018–1059, 29 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20181059.

Year Published: 2018

Collection methods, data compilation, and lessons learned from a study of stream geomorphology associated with riparian cattle grazing along the Fever River, University of Wisconsin- Platteville Pioneer Farm, Wisconsin, 2004–11

Stream geomorphic characteristics were monitored along a 0.8-mile reach of the Fever River in the Driftless Area of southwestern Wisconsin from 2004 to 2011 where cattle grazed in paddocks along the riverbank at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville’s Pioneer Farm. The study reach encompassed seven paddocks that covered a total of 30 acres on...

Peppler, Marie C.; Fitzpatrick, Faith A.
Peppler, M.C., and Fitzpatrick, F.A., 2018, Collection methods, data compilation, and lessons learned from a study of stream geomorphology associated with riparian cattle grazing along the Fever River, University of Wisconsin- Platteville Pioneer Farm, Wisconsin, 2004–11: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2016–1179, 23 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20161179.

Year Published: 2018

Human Bacteroides and total coliforms as indicators of recent combined sewer overflows and rain events in urban creeks

Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) are a known source of human fecal pollution and human pathogens in urban water bodies, which may present a significant public health threat. To monitor human fecal contamination in water, bacterial fecal indicator organisms (FIOs) are traditionally used. However, because FIOs are not specific to human sources and do...

McGinnis, Shannon; Spencer, Susan K.; Firnstahl, Aaron; Stokdyk, Joel; Borchardt, Mark A.; McCarthy, David; Murphy, Heather
Shannon McGinnis, Susan Spencer, Aaron Firnstahl, Joel Stokdyk, Mark Borchardt, David T. McCarthy, Heather M. Murphy, Human Bacteroides and total coliforms as indicators of recent combined sewer overflows and rain events in urban creeks, Science of The Total Environment, Volume 630, 15 July 2018, Pages 967-976, ISSN 0048-9697, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.02.108.