Wisconsin Water Science Center

Multimedia

Our multimedia gallery represents a collection of high-quality images, videos, webcams, posters, presentations, and documents produced by the Wisconsin Water Science Center.

Filter Total Items: 27
Photo of a center-pivot agricultural irrigation system.

In spite of some very wet weather, this center pivot in southern Wisconsin is running. Irrigation has been growing in the Midwest in recent years and it could be effecting the transport of agricultural chemicals to streams.

Photo of the Frederick Springs sand boil
June 22, 2009

The continuously bubbling water at the Frederick Springs sand boil at Pheasant Branch Conservatory in Middleton, Wis., is created groundwater flowing up through cracks in the overlying rock and sand.

Photo of a boy playing in the water on a Wisconsin beach.
August 11, 2011

Beaches, like the one where this boy is playing, can become contaminated with disease-causing bacteria that threaten public health, disrupt water recreation, and effect the Great Lakes economies that depend on summer tourism.

Photo of a streamgage collecting water data for a paired-watershed collaborative study in Sheboygan County, Wis.
September 22, 2011

This streamgage is one of two USGS gages collecting streamflow and water-quality information for a paired-watershed project in Sheboygan County, Wis. The USGS, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, conservation organizations, landowners, and farm operators are evaluating the effectiveness of conservation practices on agriculutral fields and pastures with the greatest potential for reducing phosphorus contributions to streams.

March 3, 2012

A series of time-lapse photographs capture rapid water-level fluctuations in the vicinity of Wildwood Islands in the Sheboygan River, 4.4 km upstream of Lake Michigan near Sheboygan, Wis. The fluctuations are caused the interaction of seiche-related oscillations from Lake Michigan with river flows. 
 

Photo of the depth-integrated sample arm (DISA)
March 13, 2012

A new depth-integrated sample arm (DISA) was developed to improve the representation of solids in stormwater, both organic and inorganic, by collecting a water quality sample from multiple points in the water column.

Photo of WI WSC staff member and his son exploring a field boat during the 2012 Wisconsin Water Science Center open house
May 20, 2012

Photo of WI WSC staff member and his son exploring a field boat during the 2012 Wisconsin Water Science Center open house.

June 30, 2012

A series of time-lapse photographs capture rapid water-level fluctuations in the vicinity of Wildwood Islands in the Sheboygan River, 4.4 km upstream of Lake Michigan near Sheboygan, Wis. The fluctuations are caused the interaction of seiche-related oscillations from Lake Michigan with river flows. 
 

March 31, 2013

A series of time-lapse photographs capture rapid water-level fluctuations in the vicinity of Wildwood Islands in the Sheboygan River, 4.4 km upstream of Lake Michigan near Sheboygan, Wis. The fluctuations are caused the interaction of seiche-related oscillations from Lake Michigan with river flows. 
 

June 1, 2014

Time-lapse photo of a rainfall-induced runoff event at an edge-of-field surface site near Fort Wayne, Indiana, on May 10-11, 2016. Edge-of-field monitoring is used to assess the quantity and quality of agricultural runoff and evaluate the effectiveness of conservation practices that aim to reduce nutrient loss. The runoff from an agricultural field is channeled through the H-flume, where the flow is quantified and samples are taken for water-quality analysis. Runoff events can happen at any time of the day or year, but each event provides valuable information, so the ability to capture data using automated equipment and two-way communication is crucial.

Little Plover River Wells
2014 (approx.)

Both irrigation wells and municipal wells affect water levels in the Little Plover River, Wisconsin. 

Photo of fluorescence amplification curves from a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis
June 12, 2015

Example fluorescence amplification curves from a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis. By reviewing the fluorescence amplification curves, the concentration of the pathogen in the original sample can be back-calculated from the amount and number of cycles needed to reach the target concentration.

Photo of a LIDE scientist preparing a sample for qPCR analysis
June 12, 2015

Joel Stokdyk, LIDE Biologist, prepares a sample for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis. qPCR uses fluorescence to quantify the detection of nucleic acids from a targeted pathogen.

2016 (approx.)

Completed installation of test plots: permeable pavers (foreground), permeable concrete (midground), and permeable asphalt (background).

Photo of Laboratory for Infectious Diseases and the Environment (LIDE) lab space
February 9, 2016

Photo of Laboratory for Infectious Diseases and the Environment (LIDE).

May 7, 2016

Dave Krabbenhoft discusses the history of his 28-year career at the USGS.  He describes how he started working on mercury research in the 1980s, trying to unravel the mystery of why mercury was being detected in fish in pristine lakes in Northern Wisconsin, and how that research has evolved over time to determine atmospheric mercury is the primary source of mercury pollution in those pristine ecosystems.

May 7, 2016

Dave Krabbenhoft discusses working on the U.S. EPA's Lake Guardian, and the perspective he and his team have by being on board and viewing the less developed parts of the shoreline from the middle of the lake.

May 10, 2016

During edge-of-field monitoring of an agricultural field runoff event, a depth-integrated sample arm (DISA) is used to take a water sample at the same time a traditional water sample is taken from an intake located at the bottom of the H-flume exit, where the water is assumed to be completely mixed. The DISA is normally used to collect a continuous vertical sample representing the entire water column, but in this case it collects a single fixed-location sample from a raised position off the bottom of the flume (80% of the water-column height) to verify that the traditional sample is completely mixed and without particle size or concentration bias.

Photos show change in water clarity in agricultural runoff before and after a grassed waterway was installed
June 23, 2016

These photos, taken before and after a grassed-waterway conservation practice was installed, show a change in the water clarity of agricultural runoff at an edge-of-field surface monitoring site in Wisconsin.

Photos of various edge-of-field monitoring sites, installation efforts, and runoff events across the Great Lakes basin.
2016 (approx.)

These photos show various edge-of-field monitoring surface and subsurface monitoring sites, installation efforts, and runoff events across the Great Lakes basin.

2016 (approx.)

This time-lapse video shows the construction of the new Gary City Hall parking lot and rain garden in Gary, Indiana. The City of Gary is utilizing green infrastructure in their redevelopment projects in the hopes of reducing the amount stormwater runoff that enters their storm-sewer system and, eventually, Lake Michigan. This project included reducing the amount of impervious surface and directing stormwater toward a central rain garden and peripheral grassed areas. The USGS is monitoring storm-sewer flow, groundwater, soil moisture, and meteorological conditions before and after installation to determine if there has been a reduction in stormwater volume. The data collected here, along with other case studies, will help assess the effectiveness of green infrastructure at reducing stormwater runoff.