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Filter Total Items: 3,271
Date published: November 12, 2020
Status: Active

Species Studied at the Klamath Falls Field Station

The Klamath Falls Field Station conducts research on rare and imperiled fishes in the Klamath Basin and the desert southwest. The following list contains both common and scientific names. Descriptions of species and studies can be found under the "Related Science" tab.

Contacts: Summer Burdick
Date published: November 12, 2020
Status: Active

White River spinedace (Lepidomeda albivallis) and White River desert suckers (Catostomus clarki) - KFFS

Species Studied

White River spinedace (Lepidomeda albivallis) and White River desert suckers (Catostomus clarki)

Contacts: Summer Burdick
Date published: November 12, 2020
Status: Active

Pahranagat roundtail chub (Gila robusta) - KFFS

Species Studied

Pahranagat roundtail chub (Gila robusta)

Contacts: Barbara Martin
Date published: November 12, 2020
Status: Active

Sediment Lab Suite and Carbon Analysis Lab

At our Science Center, we have a suite of laboratories that we affectionately call the "sed lab." The sed lab really consists of 5 labs, arranged next to each other to allow our lab technicians to easily move back and forth between them while processing sediment samples: Sediment Preparation Lab, Fine Particle Analysis Lab, Settling Tubes Lab, Fume Hood Lab, and Carbon Analysis Lab.

Date published: November 5, 2020
Status: Active

Core X-Ray: 3-D CT Core Imaging Laboratory

The Geotek RXCT, a "rotating x-ray computed tomography" system, creates ultra high-resolution imagery of sediment cores. The system resides at the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center in Santa Cruz, California. It requires the operator to take specialized training and hold X-ray radiation and safety certifications.

Date published: November 4, 2020
Status: Active

USGS science supporting the Elwha River Restoration Project

The Elwha River Restoration Project...

... has reconnected the water, salmon, and sediment of a pristine river and coast of the Olympic Peninsula of Washington. Coordinated by the National Park Service, restoration of the Elwha River included the removal of two large dams that had blocked salmon and sediment passage for almost 100 years. The largest dam removal in U.S. history began in...

Date published: November 2, 2020
Status: Active

Selenium Hazard in the Salton Sea Environment, Summary of Current Knowledge to Inform Future Science

The effect of selenium (Se) toxicity on wildlife has been known for more than 50 years. The threat of Se contamination gained greater attention from federal agencies in the 1980s due to the observation of embryo deformity and mortality in birds at a National Wildlife Refuge in California. Harmful effects from Se were determined to be connected to irrigation drainage water.

As a result,...

Date published: November 2, 2020
Status: Active

Eyes on Earth Episode 37 – Insuring West Africa’s Crops

Eyes on Earth is a podcast on remote sensing, Earth observation, land change and science, brought to you by the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center. In this episode, we hear how EROS data streams could be used to encourage ag production in West Africa.

Contacts: Janice Nelson
Date published: November 2, 2020
Status: Active

Earthquake Hazards in Southeastern Alaska

Over the last 100 years, the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather fault system has produced large-magnitude earthquakes affecting both Canada and the U.S. To fill in missing details about its offshore location and structure, USGS uses sophisticated techniques to truly understand the fault’s hazard potential.

Contacts: Danny Brothers
Date published: October 29, 2020
Status: Active

Enhancing Cross-Jurisdictional Adaptive Management in the Gulf of Mexico

Using an iterative qualitative coding process, WARC researchers are identifying objectives, stressors, and management priorities to support the implementation of adaptive management in restoration programs across the Gulf of Mexico.

Date published: October 29, 2020
Status: Active

USGS Snow and Avalanche Project

Snow avalanches are a widespread natural hazard to humans and infrastructure as well as an important landscape disturbance affecting mountain ecosystems. Forecasting avalanche frequency is challenging on various spatial and temporal scales, and this project aims to fill a gap in snow science by focusing on reconstructing avalanche history on the continental mountain range scale - throughout...

Date published: October 28, 2020
Status: Active

Species Studied at the Columbia River Research Laboratory

Many species are studied at the Columbia River Research Laboratory.  These species include birds, fish, invertebrates, and plants.  The list contains both common and scientific names.  Related content tab provides descriptive information for various species studied.