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The Cooperative Research Units Program conducts research on a wide range of disciplines related to fish, wildlife, and natural resource management. Our 40 Units collectively conduct research on virtually every type of North American ecological community. 

Data and Tools Technical Publications
Filter Total Items: 104
Date published: November 9, 2020

Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Paunsaugunt Plateau Herd in Utah

The Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah is home to a prolific mule deer herd numbering around 5,200 individuals in 2019. In early October, these mule deer begin their migration from the Plateau traveling south distances up to 78 miles to winter range in the Buckskin Mountains near the Utah-Arizona border. Approximately 20-30% of the Paunsaugunt Plateau herd reside in northern Arizona durin...

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration stopovers of mule deer in the Izzenhood herd, Nevada

Mule deer in the Izzenhood herd are part of a larger population known in Nevada as the “Area 6” mule deer population. They primarily reside on winter ranges in the Izzenhood Basin and upper Rock Creek drainages in western Elko County and northern Lander County. From their winter range, mule deer in this sub population migrate approximately 70 miles to summer ranges in the north

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Routes of Moose in the Jackson Herd in Wyoming

Moose in the Jackson herd make an elevational migration in the southern portion of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. This small herd of approximately 500 animals winters primarily in the Buffalo Valley just east of Jackson Lake. During migration, animals travel an average one-way distance of 33 miles, with some animals migrating as far as 67 miles. In the spring, most moose migrate north i...

Date published: November 9, 2020

Winter ranges of mule deer in the Sheep Creek Range, Nevada

Mule deer in the Sheep Creek sub herd are part of the larger Area 6 herd that occupies portions of Elko, Lander, and Eureka counties. The primary winter range of this population is located along the eastern flank of the Sheep Creek Range and the west side of Boulder Valley. Most deer migrate approximately 30 miles from winter ranges in upper Boulder Creek and Antelope Creek drainages to summe...

Date published: November 9, 2020

Winter ranges of mule deer in the Pequop Mountains, Nevada

The Area 7 mule deer population is one of the state’s largest deer herds with an estimated population of about 11,000 in 2019. This deer herd is highly important to Nevada from an economic and ecological perspective. It’s one of the longest distance deer migrations in the state of Nevada with some animals known to migrate over 120 miles during a single migration. A subset of th

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Corridors of Elk in the Interstate 17 Herd in Arizona

The Interstate 17 (I-17) elk herd primarily resides in Arizona’s GMU 6A and 11M south of Flagstaff. The population estimate for elk in GMU 6A was 6,500 in 2019. Their summer range consists of gentle topography with ponderosa pine forest and interspersed riparian-meadow habitat. Annually, the I-17 elk herd migrates an average of 24 miles to lower-elevation winter range dominated by

Date published: November 9, 2020

Wyoming Game and Fish Department stopovers of mule deer in the Baggs Herd, Wyoming

The Baggs Mule Deer Corridor was officially designated by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) in 2018 (fig. 24). The Baggs Herd is managed for approximately 19,000 animals, and the corridor is based on two wintering deer populations: a northern and southern segment. Animals in the north segment occupy a relatively small winter range along a pinyon-juniper ridge that runs alo

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Wyoming Range South Population in Wyoming

Mule deer in the southern Wyoming Range population winter north of Evanston in the relatively low mountains between Kemmerer, Wyoming, and Woodruff Narrows Reservoir along the Utah border. Many deer in this population migrate north more than 100 mi (161 km) to summer ranges in the Wyoming Range surrounding Afton, Wyoming. Migrations in this population are not limited to Wyoming, with

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration corridors of mule deer in the South Tuscarora Mountains, Nevada

Mule deer in the South Tuscarora herd are part of the larger “Area 6” deer population that reside in the southern and eastern portion of this big game Management Area (MA 6). The winter range for this sub population is located along the western slopes of the Tuscarora Mountains and the Dunphy Hills. The spring migration route for this deer herd traverses north along the toe

Date published: November 9, 2020

Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Ruby Mountains, Nevada

The Area 10 mule deer population is one of the largest deer herds in the state, accounting for roughly 20 percent of the statewide mule deer population. The Area 10 herd is comprised of several sub populations that occupy the majority of the Ruby Mountains, are highly migratory,and exhibit long distance migrations from summer to winter ranges. Several key stopovers occur within the migratio...

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Routes of Elk in the Interstate 17 Herd in Arizona

The Interstate 17 (I-17) elk herd primarily resides in Arizona’s GMU 6A and 11M south of Flagstaff. The population estimate for elk in GMU 6A was 6,500 in 2019. Their summer range consists of gentle topography with ponderosa pine forest and interspersed riparian-meadow habitat. Annually, the I-17 elk herd migrates an average of 24 miles to lower-elevation winter range dominated by

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Routes of Mule Deer in Platte Valley South Population in Wyoming

Mule deer in the Platte Valley South population are part of the larger Platte Valley herd unit with an estimated population of 11,000 animals. These mule deer winter in the sagebrush canyons and basins near the Platte and Encampment Rivers, south of Saratoga, Wyoming (fig. 29). Most of these deer migrate southerly 20–70 mi (32–113 km) to portions of the Sierra Madre%

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Year Published: 2020

Tissue distribution and immunomodulation in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) following dietary exposure to polychlorinated biphenyl Aroclors and food deprivation

Although most countries banned manufacturing of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) over 40 years ago, PCBs remain a global concern for wildlife and human health due to high bioaccumulation and biopersistance. PCB uptake mechanisms have been well studied in many taxa; however, less is known about depuration rates and how post-exposure diet can...

White, Sahnnon L; DeMario, Devin A; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Wagner, Tyler

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Year Published: 2020

Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units program—2019 year in review

Acting Chief’s MessageDear Cooperators:Members of the Cooperative Research Units are pleased to provide you with the “2019 Year in Review” report for the Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units (CRUs). You will first note that this report looks a little different than those published in the past few years, as we opted for a shorter, more...

Thompson, John D.; Dennerline, Donald E.; Childs, Dawn E.
Thompson, J.D., Dennerline, D.E., and Childs, D.E., 2020, Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units program—2019 year in review: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1463, 22 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/cir1463.

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Year Published: 2020

Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units program—2019 year in review postcard

Acting Chief’s MessageDear friends,I invite you to take a look at U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1463, “Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program—2019 Year in Review,” now available at https://doi.org/10.3133/cir1463. In this report, you will find details about the Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units (CRU) program concerning...

Thompson, John D.; Dennerline, Donald E.; Childs, Dawn E.
Thompson, J.D., Dennerline, D.E., and Childs, D.E., 2020, Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units program—2019 year in review postcard: U.S. Geological Survey General Information Product 195, 2 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/gip195.

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Year Published: 2020

Quantifying harvestable fish and crustacean production and associated economic values provided by oyster reefs

Quantifying ecosystem services can provide information to justify conservation and restoration decisions so as to allocate limited resources effectively. Consequently, decision makers and public typically ask for simple and understandable information with confidence regarding the availability of the services and the probable economic value. Here,...

Lai, QT; Irwin, Elise R.; Zhang, Yawen

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Year Published: 2020

Modelling pinniped abundance and distribution by combining counts at terrestrial sites and in-water sightings

Pinnipeds are commonly monitored using aerial photographic surveys at land- or ice-based sites, where animals come ashore for resting, pupping, molting, and to avoid predators. Although these counts form the basis for monitoring population change over time, they do not provide information regarding where animals occur in the water, which is often...

Whitlock, Steven L.; Womble, Jamie N.; Peterson, James

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Year Published: 2020

Flea sharing among sympatric rodent hosts: implications for potential plague effects on a threatened sciurid

For vector-borne diseases, the abundance and competency of different vector species and their host preferences will impact the transfer of pathogens among hosts. Sylvatic plague is a lethal disease caused by the primarily flea-borne bacterium Yersinia pestis. Sylvatic plague was introduced into the western United States in the early 1900s and...

Goldberg, Amanda R.; Conway, Courtney J.; Biggins, Dean E.

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Year Published: 2020

Effects of temperature on hatching rate and early development of alligator gar and spotted gar in a laboratory setting

Water temperature influences both morphological and physiological development in fishes. However, the effects of water temperature on the early development of Alligator Gar Atractosteus spatula and Spotted Gar Lepisosteus oculatus are not well understood. Both gar species were collected from natural environments and spawned in...

Long, James M.; Snow, R.A.; Porta, M.J.

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Year Published: 2020

Non-crop habitat use by wild bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) in a mixed-use agricultural landscape

Homogeneous, agriculturally intense landscapes have abundant records of pollinator community research, though similar studies in the forest-dominated, heterogeneous mixed-use landscape that dominates the northeastern United States are sparse. Trends of landscape effects on wild bees are consistent across homogeneous agricultural landscapes,...

Du Clos, Brianne; Loftin, Cyndy; Drummond, Francis A.

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Year Published: 2020

Combining fisheries surveys to inform marine species distribution modelling

Ecosystem-scale examination of fish communities typically involves creating spatio-temporally explicit relative abundance distribution maps using data from multiple fishery-independent surveys. However, sampling performance varies by vessel and sampling gear, which may influence estimated species distribution patterns. Using GAMMs, the effect of...

Moriarty, Meadhbh; Pedreschi, Debbi; Smeltz, T. Scott; Sethi, Suresh; Harris, Bradley P.; McGonigle, Chris; Wolf, Nathan; Greenstreet, Simon P.R.

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Year Published: 2020

Longitudinal distribution of uncommon fishes in a species-rich basin

The spatial organization of fishes in a river system was investigated to evaluate the longitudinal distribution of uncommon species. It was anticipated that overall richness of the fish community would increase in a downstream direction together with habitat extent, but that more uncommon species would occur upstream owing to greater heterogeneity...

Miranda, Leandro E.; Killgore, K.J.

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Year Published: 2020

Biotic interactions help explain variation in elevational range limits of birds among Bornean mountains

AimPhysiological tolerances and biotic interactions along habitat gradients are thought to influence species occurrence. Distributional differences caused by such forces are particularly noticeable on tropical mountains, where high species turnover along elevational gradients occurs over relatively short distances and elevational distributions of...

Burner, Ryan C.; Boyce, Andy J.; Bernasconi, David; Styring, Alison R.; Shakya, Subir B.; Boer, Chandradewana; Rahman, Mustafa Abdul; Martin, Thomas E.; Sheldon, Frederick H.

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Year Published: 2020

Nest site selection influences cinnamon teal nest survival in Colorado

Nest survival of ducks is partially a function of the spatiotemporal characteristics of the site at which a bird chooses to nest. Nest survival is also a fundamental component of population growth in waterfowl but is relatively unstudied for cinnamon teal (Spatula cyanoptera). We investigated cinnamon teal nest survival in a managed wetland...

Kendall, William L.; Setash, Casey M.; Olson, David

Under the guidelines of the Cooperative Research Agreement, CRU is required to communicate with funders, cooperators, stakeholders, and the public. CRU maintains outreach pathways and participation among state, federal, university, and private researchers.

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Smithsonian’s Natural History Museum
December 31, 2015

USGS Volunteer Student at the Smithsonian Natural History Museum

The Smithsonian Natural History Museum offers hands-on learning experiences.

Pallid sturgeon
December 31, 2015

Pallid Sturgeon

The pallid sturgeon is an endangered riverine sturgeon with historical distribution restricted to parts of the Yellowstone, Missouri, Mississippi, and Atchafalaya Rivers. Although rare, pallid sturgeon in the lower Mississippi River appear to be naturally recruiting, and information about habitat use is important to conserve this species. This study seeks to provide

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Assessment of the Invasion of the Asian Swamp Eels
August 1, 2015

Assessment of the Invasion of the Asian Swamp Eel

The Asian swamp eel is an invasive species that was introduced into the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area and has persisted for more than 20 years. The Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area manages, protects, and interprets the biota and landscape of the Chattahoochee River corridor, and the Asian swamp eel is an invasive species that threatens the

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Sarah Sonsthagen, Assistant Unit Leader of Wildlife, Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
October 28, 2013

Sarah Sonsthagen, Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Intro
Sarah joined the Nebraska Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit in 2020 from the USGS Alaska Science Center.

Biography

For more information about Sarah, including a full publications list, visit her profile page on the Nebraska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit website.

 
Sarah

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 Passage of adult Atlantic salmon in the Penobscot River, Maine
June 3, 2006

Passage of adult Atlantic salmon in the Penobscot River, Maine

Atlantic salmon runs in the Penobscot and Kennebec Rivers of Maine are federally endangered and remain low. Inefficient fishways at dams continue to slow and prevent upstream migrations to spawning habitat, and delays of weeks to months are common. These delays expose fish to elevated water temperatures, resulting in increased metabolic demands. These energetic costs have

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