Cooperative Research Units

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Established in 1935, our mission is our hallmark: meet the actionable science needs of our cooperators, provide technical assistance, and develop the future workforce through graduate education/mentoring. The Coop Units are located on 40 universities in 38 states. They are called Coop Units because each cooperator plays a role in the staffing, funding and directing the units. 

Find out more about CRUs

News

Date published: September 9, 2021

Nevada Becomes 39th State to Create Multi-Agency Cooperative Research Unit

The newly formed Nevada Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit brings state and federal wildlife-management resources together, providing for a cooperative partnership that ensures resources are best serving Nevada’s wildlife and wild places.

Date published: August 2, 2021

Friday's Findings - August 6 2021

Structured decision making and adaptive management with the Central Valley Project Improvement Act fisheries program…progress? 

Date: August 6, 2021 from 2-2:30 p.m. eastern time

Speaker: James Peterson, Unit Leader, USGS Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit 

Date published: June 21, 2021

Friday's Findings - June 25 2021

The Role of Drought in Aquatic Systems: Population and Community Dynamics

Date:  June 25, 2021 from 2-2:30 p.m. eastern time

Speaker: Daniel Magoulick, Fish Biologist, Arkansas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Assistant Unit Leader

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The CRU program remains very productive and maintains a bright future. One of the things contributing to that bright future is a $5.6 million increase in our most recent Congressional appropriations. This amount will help us meet longstanding programmatic needs, such as filling all the vacancies in our scientific workforce and providing much-needed upgrades to our research equipment.

CRU Science
Filter Total Items: 25
Date published: July 12, 2021
Status: Active

The Role of Drought in Aquatic Systems

Drought is a natural disturbance of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems in many regions worldwide and can be a major factor that impacts aquatic communities. Drought frequency and intensity are expected to increase due to climate change and can also be exacerbated by water withdrawals and other human impacts, such as agricultural and industrial uses.

Date published: July 7, 2021
Status: Active

Native Trout Threatened by Climate Change and Invasive Species

The Rio Grande cutthroat trout is a cultural icon in Colorado and New Mexico, but its populations are threatened. After one hundred years of human population growth, climate change, and species invasions, the fish now occupies only 12% of its historic range. 

Date published: June 15, 2021
Status: Active

Actionable Science may Inform Climate Decisions about Coquí Frogs in Puerto Rico

Temperature and precipitation changes from climate change, along with habitat fragmentation and other effects of land use change threaten the long-term persistence of coquí frogs in Puerto Rico. The USGS North Carolina Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit (NC CRU) and ...

Date published: May 11, 2021
Status: Active

Translocating Florida scrub-jays to bolster the threatened species’ population

The Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit (Florida CRU), a program in the Ecosystems Mission Area at the U.S. Geological Survey, is collaborating with state and federal agencies to assess the success of translocating Florida scrub-jays to bolster the threatened species’ population.

Date published: April 5, 2021
Status: Active

Unique Study of Isolated Bobcat Population Confirms Accuracy of Extinction Model

The reintroduction of 32 bobcats to an island off the coast of Georgia more than three decades ago created an ideal experiment to examine the accuracy of a genetic-modeling technique that predicts extinction of isolated wildlife populations. That’s the conclusion of Penn State researchers who continue to monitor the bobcat population on Cumberland Island National Seashore, and who conducted a...

Date published: March 9, 2021
Status: Active

Hurricane Portfolio

Research conducted as part of the CRU program is determined, approved, and supported by each unit’s coordinating committee composed of representatives from the USGS, one or more of the respective State fish and wildlife agencies, the host university, the Wildlife Management Institute, and the USFWS. The stakeholder-driven nature of the program’s research portfolio is designed to ensure that...

Contacts: Dawn E Childs
Date published: February 19, 2021
Status: Active

Stream Health Correlated with Human Well-being and Demographics in Virginia

Relationships between human well-being (HWB) and ecosystem health (EH) are best understood via approaches coupling natural and social sciences. The Virginia Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit  is leading an interdisciplinary team of scientists from Virginia Tech to explore HWB-EH relationships and design studies...

Date published: January 11, 2021
Status: Active

Islands to Interfaces: Integrating Field Biology with Computer Science to Address Wildlife Survey Challenges

The USGS Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit is collaborating with faculty and graduate and undergraduate students in wildlife ecology, remote sensing, and computer science at the University of Maine to investigate the efficacy of using a variety of data collection approaches to survey...

Date published: December 14, 2020
Status: Active

Culturally Important Fishponds in Hawaii

Researchers at the Hawai’i Cooperative Fishery Research Unit (HCFRU), working in collaboration with the Hawai’i Division of Aquatic Resources, Kamehameha Schools, and the Edith Kanaka’ole Foundation, investigated how the species composition of fish assemblages in actively managed and inactive fishponds differed from...

Date published: November 16, 2020
Status: Active

Improving Insights for Recreational Fishery at the Mouth of the Columbia River

The USGS Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit (ORCFWRU) at Oregon State University (OSU) is partnering with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) to evaluate alternative management actions for a high-value, mixed-stock recreational fishery on fall-run Chinook salmon at the mouth of the Columbia River. Image: USGS Oregon Water Science Center research vessel....

Date published: October 12, 2020
Status: Active

Beavers in the Desert? The Potential for Translocated Beavers to Serve as Restoration Tools in Desert Rivers

The USGS Utah Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at Utah State University (USU) is evaluating the efficacy of beaver translocation for desert river restoration by comparing the fates, space use, and dam building activity of naturally occurring and translocated beavers in the Price and San Rafael...

Date published: September 14, 2020
Status: Active

Incorporating “Big Hairy Audacious Goals” into Natural Resource Research, Management, and Conservation

Kansas is the home to a diverse aquatic community. However, many fish have been designated as species in need of conservation because of land use change, water alterations, and other human impacts. The Kansas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit (Kansas Unit) at Kansas State University is leading research on "big...

The Cooperative Research Units Program conducts research on a wide range of disciplines related to fish, wildlife, and natural resource management. Our 40 Units collectively conduct research on virtually every type of North American ecological community. 

Data and Tools Technical Publications
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Date published: May 11, 2021

Salinity-temperature Interactions on Freshwater Fish Physiology (2015-2018)

This data release supports the manuscript entitled "Warmer temperatures interact with salinity to weaken physiological facilitation to stress in freshwater fishes", and includes one data set with values representing the physiological responses of freshwater fishes to salinity and temperature gradients in field surveys from the Wyoming Range (2015 to 2017) and laboratory...

Date published: January 18, 2021

Average well color development data for water samples from six locations within the historic section of Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky

Water samples were collected from six cave locations where Actinobacterial mats appeared to be plentiful. Community-level physiological capabilities were evaluated using Biolog-Ecolog plates inoculated with cave water dosed with 0 or 0.10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) of erythromycin. The data were transformed into average well color development (AWCD).

Date published: December 15, 2020

Average well color development data for water samples from six locations within the historic section of Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky

Water samples were collected from six cave locations where Actinobacterial mats appeared to be plentiful. Community-level physiological capabilities were evaluated using Biolog-Ecolog plates inoculated with cave water dosed with 0 or 0.10 milligrams per liter (mg/L) of erythromycin. The data were transformed into average well color development (AWCD). The transformation is done by subtr

Date published: November 9, 2020

Routes of Mule Deer in the Ruby Mountains, Nevada

The Area 10 mule deer population is one of the largest deer herds in the state, accounting for roughly 20 percent of the statewide mule deer population. The Area 10 herd is comprised of several sub populations that occupy the majority of the Ruby Mountains, are highly migratory,and exhibit long distance migrations from summer to winter ranges. Several key stopovers occur within the migratio...

Date published: November 9, 2020

Wyoming Game and Fish Department Designated Migration Corridor of mule deer in the Sublette Herd, Wyoming

The Sublette Herd Corridor was designated by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department in 2016. The Sublette Herd supports an estimated 20,000 to 25,000 animals, and the corridors represent movements from three subpopulations, including the Ryegrass, Mesa, and Red Desert segments. Deer from the Ryegrass winter west of the Green River and migrate northwest into portions of the Wyoming Range

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Kaibab North Herd in Arizona

Mule deer of the Kaibab North herd on the Kaibab Plateau are treasured for their historic and contemporary significance in North America. They are the densest population of mule deer in Arizona, with an estimate of 10,200 individuals in 2019. This report compiles two research efforts, the first completed by Arizona Game and Fish Department in 2014, and the second from Utah Division of Wil

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Paunsaugunt Plateau Herd in Utah

The Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah is home to a prolific mule deer herd numbering around 5,200 individuals in 2019. In early October, these mule deer begin their migration from the Plateau traveling south distances up to 78 miles to winter range in the Buckskin Mountains near the Utah-Arizona border. Approximately 20-30% of the Paunsaugunt Plateau herd reside in northern Arizona durin...

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Wyoming Range North Population in Wyoming

Mule deer in the northern Wyoming Range population use winter ranges in the area between Big Piney and LaBarge. During spring, these deer generally move northwesterly to high-elevation summer ranges in the Salt River and Wyoming Ranges. Interchange with deer in the Sublette herd unit has been documented, with some individuals migrating northwest into Upper Green River drainages. At least one...

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Routes of Mule Deer in Platte Valley North Population in Wyoming

Mule deer in the Platte Valley North population are part of the larger Platte Valley herd unit with an estimated population of 11,000 animals (fig. 28). These mule deer winter in the sagebrush canyons and basins near the Platte River north of Saratoga, Wyoming. Other segments of this population winter in the Chokecherry Knob area, south of Sinclair, and the Dana Ridge area just north

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Routes of Moose in the Pinedale Herd in Wyoming

The Sublette herd is the largest moose population in Wyoming, numbering approximately 1,800 individuals. This herd winters among the willow-dominated floodplains of the Green River Basin, primarily the eastern foothills of the Wyoming Range; some animals winter also in the Hoback Basin. As a partially migratory population, approximately half of the moose are resident, while migratory

Date published: November 9, 2020

Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the San Francisco Peaks Herd in Arizona

In 2008, 13 mule deer were GPS collared near the South Rim of the Grand Canyon to understand the impact of Arizona’s State Route 64 on mule deer movement. Unexpectedly, 4 individuals migrated over 50 miles to summer range near the San Francisco Peaks, north of Flagstaff, containing alpine, subalpine, and ponderosa pine habitats. The GPS collars dropped in 2009, but questions

Date published: November 9, 2020

Winter ranges of mule deer in the South Tuscarora Mountains, Nevada

Mule deer in the South Tuscarora herd are part of the larger “Area 6” deer population that reside in the southern and eastern portion of this big game Management Area (MA 6). The winter range for this sub population is located along the western slopes of the Tuscarora Mountains and the Dunphy Hills. The spring migration route for this deer herd traverses north along the toe

Filter Total Items: 5
Date published: February 19, 2021

2020 Year in Review story map

Our scientists work with State fish and wildlife agencies and Federal natural resource agencies, providing them with the science used in management decisions to support sustainable fish and wildlife populations, thus helping to maintain biodiversity, address climate change, and enhance wildlife watching and sustainable use. 

Date published: February 19, 2020

2019 Year in Review story map

We lead applied research that can provide objective science for the management needs of cooperators and inform decision making. In this story, we have chosen to highlight just a few with select examples of the many management-oriented research projects conducted with our State and Federal partners.

Date published: April 19, 2018

USGS Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units: 2017 Year In Review

In September 1960, the 86th Congress passed Public Law 86-686 to facilitate cooperation between the Federal government, colleges and universities, the States, and private organizations for Cooperative Unit Programs of research and education relating to fish and wildlife, and for other purposes. The Cooperative Research Units originated in the U.S. Department of Agriculture in the mid 1930s

Date published: February 15, 2017

2016 Cooperative Research Unit Story Map

In this Year in Review report, you will find details on staffing, vacancies, research funding, and other pertinent information. You will also see snapshots of Unit projects with information on how results have been or are being applied by cooperators. That is the essence of what we do: science that matter.

 

Date published: February 1, 2016

2015 Cooperative Research Units Story Map

The Cooperative Research Unit mission is our hallmark: meeting the actionable science needs of our cooperators, providing them technical guidance and assistance in interpreting and applying new advances in science, and developing the future workforce through graduate education and mentoring. 

Filter Total Items: 2,893
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Year Published: 2021

Oyster model inventory: Identifying critical data and modeling approaches to support restoration of oyster reefs in coastal U.S. Gulf of Mexico waters

Executive SummaryAlong the coast of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) plays important ecological and economic roles. Commercial landings from this region account for more than 50 percent of all U.S. landings; these oyster reefs also provide varied ecosystem services, including nursery habitat for many fish and...

La Peyre, Megan K.; Marshall, Danielle A.; Sable, Shaye E.
La Peyre, M.K., Marshall, D.A., and Sable, S.E., 2021, Oyster model inventory: Identifying critical data and modeling approaches to support restoration of oyster reefs in coastal U.S. Gulf of Mexico waters: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2021–1063, 40 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20211063.

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Year Published: 2021

Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units program—2020 Year in review

Established in 1935, the Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units program (CRU program) is a unique cooperative partnership among State fish and wildlife agencies, universities, the Wildlife Management Institute, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Designed to meet the scientific needs of natural resource...

Thompson, John D.; Dennerline, Donald E.; Childs, Dawn E.; Jodice, Patrick G.R.
Thompson, J.D., Dennerline, D.E., Childs, D.E., and Jodice, P.G.R., 2021, Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units program—2020 Year in review (ver. 1.1, March 2021): U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1478, 22 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/cir1478.

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Year Published: 2021

Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units program—2020 research abstracts

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) serves as the research arm of the U.S. Department of the Interior and has established a series of strategic goals that focus its efforts on serving the American people. Within the USGS, the Ecosystems Mission Area is responsible for conducting and sponsoring research that addresses the following thematic...

Thompson, John D.; Jodice, Patrick G.R.; Dennerline, Donald E.; Childs, Dawn E.
Thompson, J.D., Jodice, P.G.R., Dennerline, D.E., and Childs, D.E., eds., 2021, Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units program—2020 research abstracts: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1477, 200 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/cir1477.

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Year Published: 2021

Identification of the Gulf of Mexico as an important high-use habitat for leatherback turtles from Central America

Endangered leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) are wide-ranging, long-distance migrants whose movements are often associated with environmental cues. We examined the spatial distribution and habitat use for 33 satellite-tracked leatherbacks from nesting beaches on the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica and Panama from 2004 to 2018, an...

Evans, D.R.; Valverde, R.A.; Ordoñez, C.; Carthy, Raymond R.

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Year Published: 2021

The influence of subcolony-scale nesting habitat on the reproductive success of Adélie penguins

Group-size variation is common in colonially breeding species, including seabirds, whose breeding colonies can vary in size by several orders of magnitude. Seabirds are some of the most threatened marine taxa and understanding the drivers of colony size variation is more important than ever. Reproductive success is an important demographic...

Schmidt, Annie E.; Ballard, Grant; Lescroël, Amélie; Dugger, Catherine M.; Jongsomjit, Dennis; Elrod, Megan L.; Ainley, David G.

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Year Published: 2021

Climate change is creating a mismatch between protected areas and suitable habitats for frogs and birds in Puerto Rico

Climate change is altering the spatial distribution of many species around the world. In response, we need to identify and protect suitable areas for a large proportion of the fauna so that they persist through time. This exercise must also evaluate the ability of existing protected areas to provide safe havens for species in the context of...

Campos-Cerqueira, Marconi; Terando, Adam; Murray, Brent; Collazo, Jaime; Aide, Mitchell

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Year Published: 2021

Maintenance of nest quality in Adélie penguins Pygoscelis adeliae: An additional benefit to life in the center

In colonial seabirds, differences in the nesting or fledging success have been associated with differences in nest position within the breeding aggregation (subcolony): less successful nests are located on the periphery, with more successful nests closer to the center. For Pygoscelid penguins, central nests tend to be larger, with nest...

Morandini, Virginia; Dugger, Catherine M.; Lescroël, Amélie; Schmidt, Annie; Ballard, Grant

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Year Published: 2021

U.S. Geological Survey landscape science strategy 2020–2030

Across our Nation, multiple Federal, State, Tribal, and local governments are working with stakeholders and landowners to restore, conserve, and manage lands and resources to benefit fish, wildlife, and people. One of the largest Federal efforts is led by the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), with multiple DOI agencies working to conserve and...

Jenni, Karen E.; Carter, Sarah K.; Aumen, Nicholas G.; Bowen, Zachary H.; Bradford, John B.; Chotkowski, Michael A.; Hsu, Leslie; Murdoch, Peter S.; Phillips, Scott W.; Pope, Kevin L.; Schuster, Rudy; Steinkamp, Melanie J.; Weltzin, Jake; Xian, George Z.
Jenni, K.E., Carter, S.K., Aumen, N.G., Bowen, Z.H., Bradford, J.B., Chotkowski, M.A., Hsu, L., Murdoch, P.S., Phillips, S.W., Pope, K.L., Schuster, R., Steinkamp, M.J., Weltzin, J., and Xian, G.Z., 2021, U.S. Geological Survey landscape science strategy 2020–2030: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1484, 26 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/cir1484.

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Year Published: 2021

Decision analysis of barrier placement and targeted removal to control invasive carp in the Tennessee River Basin

Controlling range expansion of invasive carp (specifically Hypophthalmichthys spp.) on the Tennessee River is important to conserve the ecological and economic benefits provided by the river. We collaborated with State and Federal agencies (the stakeholder group) to develop a decision framework and decision support model to evaluate strategies to...

van der Burg, Max Post; Smith, David R.; Cupp, Aaron R.; Rogers, Mark W.; Chapman, Duane C.
Post van der Burg, M., Smith, D.R., Cupp, A.R., Rogers, M.W., and Chapman, D.C., 2021, Decision analysis of barrier placement and targeted removal to control invasive carp in the Tennessee River Basin: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2021–1068, 18 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20211068.

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Year Published: 2021

The precarious position of wildlife conservation funding in the United States

The Pittman-Robertson Act was established in 1937 to fund state-based wildlife conservation through an existing excise tax on sporting arms and ammunition. Because these items were purchased mostly by hunters at the time, they were the user group primarily funding wildlife conservation. Subsequent amendments to Pittman-Robertson expanded the...

Duda, Mark D.; Beppler, Tom; Austen, Douglas S.; Organ, John F.

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Year Published: 2021

Epigean crayfish of the Potomac River Basin in West Virginia: Zoogeography, natural history and conservation

Crayfish are an aquatic fauna of conservation concern, yet regional studies are lacking on zoogeography and life history. We compared recent and historical species distribution data and assessed conservation standings of native and nonindigenous crayfish of the Potomac River Basin in West Virginia. From 2007–2011, a total of 1764 crayfish were...

Loughman, Zachary J.; Sykes, Audrey M.; McKinney, Matthew I.; Welsh, Stuart A.

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Year Published: 2021

Acoustic tag retention and tagging mortality of juvenile cisco Coregonus artedi

Release of hatchery-reared juvenile cisco (Coregonus artedi) is an important tool for recovering Great Lakes populations, but post-release survival is unknown. Telemetry using small acoustic tags provides opportunities to assess the efficacy of hatchery-reared fish releases. However, better understanding of the tolerance of juvenile...

McKenna, James E.; Sethi, Suresh; Scholten, Grant Marvin; Kraus, Jeremy W.; Chalupnicki, Marc

Under the guidelines of the Cooperative Research Agreement, CRU is required to communicate with funders, cooperators, stakeholders, and the public. CRU maintains outreach pathways and participation among state, federal, university, and private researchers.

Filter Total Items: 44
Productivity of Black Oystercatchers in Southwest Alaska
December 16, 2020

Productivity of Black Oystercatchers in Southwest Alaska

The black oystercatcher, a keystone species in nearshore ecosystems, plays an important role in structuring nearshore systems and is highly susceptible to human disturbance. Current inventory and monitoring efforts may not adequately address the information needs for estimating long-term trends for this species. To address these issues, the goal of this research is to

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 Standard Fish Sampling Techniques and Environmental DNA for Characterizing Fish Relative Abundance,
December 15, 2020

Standard Fish Sampling Techniques

Examining environmental deoxyribonucleic acid (eDNA) in water samples has demonstrated promise for identifying fish species present in water bodies. However, whether or not this same approach can be used to assess relative abundance, biomass, and species composition in large (greater than [>] 200-hectare) waterbodies is unclear. This research compared

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An open-canopied ephemeral wetland
April 1, 2020

Longleaf pine systems support gopher frog populations

An open-canopied ephemeral wetland occupied by gopher frogs in the northern Florida Peninsula. Wetlands like these surrounded by sandy upland habitat, such as longleaf pine systems, support gopher frog populations.

discover ecosystems by clicking on image for full description.
March 24, 2020

Discover Ecosystems

Ecosystems and the wild things that live in them are the foundation of our conservation heritage and an economic asset to current and future generations of Americans. Healthy ecosystems support living things and natural processes that bring prosperity and enjoyment for all Americans. 

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$58.1 BILLION
Estimated economic output of DOI-

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An exploration of the direct and indirect effects of climatic warming on arctic lake ecosystems
September 7, 2019

An exploration of the direct and indirect effects of climatic warming

Arctic lakes support trophic interactions, biological processes, and critical habitat at all trophic levels; however, climatic warming threatens to alter the structure and function of aquatic communities and overall system production. Arctic ecosystems are warming at some of the fastest rates observed on Earth, and arctic lakes are experiencing more frequent years of

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 Adaptive Management and Monitoring of Pyramid Lake, Nevada UT
July 23, 2019

Adaptive Management and Monitoring of Pyramid Lake, Nevada UT

Pyramid Lake, Nevada, is one of the last remaining strongholds for lacustrine Lahontan cutthroat trout; almost all other large lake populations have undergone population declines or extirpation as a result of habitat degradation, overharvest, and water diversions, all compounded by the stocking of nonnative species. The population depends almost entirely on stocking

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Chronic wasting disease
July 9, 2019

Chronic wasting disease is an infectious disease

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging infectious disease that is fatal to free-ranging and captive animals in Cervidae (the deer family; referred to as “cervids”). Affected animals include deer, elk, moose, and reindeer. Once an animal is infected, CWD typically causes neurological

...
Chronic wasting disease
July 9, 2019

Chronic wasting disease is an infectious disease

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging infectious disease that is fatal to free-ranging and captive animals in Cervidae (the deer family; referred to as “cervids”). Affected animals include deer, elk, moose, and reindeer. Once an animal is infected, CWD typically causes neurological

...
Chronic wasting disease
July 9, 2019

Chronic wasting disease is an infectious disease

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging infectious disease that is fatal to free-ranging and captive animals in Cervidae (the deer family; referred to as “cervids”). Affected animals include deer, elk, moose, and reindeer. Once an animal is infected, CWD typically causes neurological

...
Chronic wasting disease
July 9, 2019

Chronic wasting disease is an infectious disease

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging infectious disease that is fatal to free-ranging and captive animals in Cervidae (the deer family; referred to as “cervids”). Affected animals include deer, elk, moose, and reindeer. Once an animal is infected, CWD typically causes neurological

...
Chronic wasting disease
July 9, 2019

Chronic wasting disease is an infectious disease

Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging infectious disease that is fatal to free-ranging and captive animals in Cervidae (the deer family; referred to as “cervids”). Affected animals include deer, elk, moose, and reindeer. Once an animal is infected, CWD typically causes neurological

...
White-tailed deer and chronic wasting disease
July 9, 2019

White-tailed deer

Distribution map: distribution of chronic wasting disease in North America

Chronic wasting disease may have long-term negative effects on white-tailed deer, a highly visible and economically valuable keystone species, according to a 

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Filter Total Items: 25
Date published: September 9, 2021

Nevada Becomes 39th State to Create Multi-Agency Cooperative Research Unit

The newly formed Nevada Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit brings state and federal wildlife-management resources together, providing for a cooperative partnership that ensures resources are best serving Nevada’s wildlife and wild places.

Date published: August 2, 2021

Friday's Findings - August 6 2021

Structured decision making and adaptive management with the Central Valley Project Improvement Act fisheries program…progress? 

Date: August 6, 2021 from 2-2:30 p.m. eastern time

Speaker: James Peterson, Unit Leader, USGS Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit 

Date published: June 21, 2021

Friday's Findings - June 25 2021

The Role of Drought in Aquatic Systems: Population and Community Dynamics

Date:  June 25, 2021 from 2-2:30 p.m. eastern time

Speaker: Daniel Magoulick, Fish Biologist, Arkansas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Assistant Unit Leader

...

Date published: May 6, 2021

International team partners with UN to launch global initiative to map ungulate migrations

An international team of 92 scientists and conservationists has joined forces to create the first-ever global atlas of ungulate (hooved mammal) migrations, working in partnership with the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS), a UN treaty.

Date published: May 6, 2021

2021 Cooperative Research Unit Recognition Awards

These awards represent significant achievement in the CRU Program. We congratulate the recipients for their scientific excellence, and service to the program, to their cooperators, and to natural resource conservation. 

Date published: April 29, 2021

Friday's Findings - May 7 2021

Structured decision making: A strategy for collaboration and conservation of imperiled herpetofauna (Carolina gopher-frog) 

Date: May 7, 2021 from 2-2:30 p.m. eastern time

Speaker: Brian Crawford, Postdoctoral Research Scientist, Georgia Cooperative Research Unit 

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Date published: March 8, 2021

Friday's Findings - March 19 2021

Impacts of translocation on the cooperatively breeding Florida scrub-jay in Ocala National Forest 

Date: March 19, 2021 from 2-2:30 p.m. eastern time

Speakers: Alexis Cardas, Graduate Research Assistant, University of Florida, USGS Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit 

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Date published: February 22, 2021

Friday's Findings - March 5 2021

Species Status Assessments to Support Endangered Species Decision Making

Date: March 5, 2021 from 2-2:30 p.m. eastern time

Speakers: 

Conor McGowan, Assistant Unit Leader, Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

David Smith, Research Statistician (Biology), Eastern Ecological Science Center

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Date published: November 20, 2020

Bird of Courage

When celebrating Thanksgiving with your family this year, remember that the turkey is not just the main course, but, as Benjamin Franklin said, it’s also a noble fowl deeply rooted in American tradition. 

Date published: November 12, 2020

New Maps Document Big-Game Migrations Across the Western United States

LARAMIE, Wyo. – For the first time, state and federal wildlife biologists have come together to map the migrations of ungulates – hooved mammals such as mule deer, elk, pronghorn, moose and bison – across America’s West. The maps will help land managers and conservationists pinpoint actions necessary to keep migration routes open and functional to sustain healthy big-game populations.

Date published: September 27, 2017

Research to Recover Threatened Waterfowl: USGS Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit Supervisor Receives Prestigious U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Recovery Champion Award

USGS scientist James “Barry” Grand, Ph.D., has been named a 2016 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Recovery Champion (Region 7) for his exemplary long-term research on two formerly threatened species, the spectacled eider and Alaska-breeding Steller’s eiders.

The cooperative nature of the CRU Program provides the workforce with a familiarity with the needs and policies of State and Federal science and management agencies. The success of this approach is evident in that CRU students have gone on to hold important leadership positions in nearly every State and Federal conservation agency.

Cooperators
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