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Our fisheries researchers are world-class scientists. They conduct cutting-edge research to provide fisheries resource managers the scientific information they need in order to protect, restore, and enhance our Nation’s fisheries and their habitats.

Unconventional Oil and Gas Impacts Aquatic Communities

Unconventional Oil and Gas Impacts Aquatic Communities

A new USGS publication evaluates the effects of unconventional oil and gas on streams: Stream Vulnerability to Widespread and Emergent Stressors--A Focus on Unconventional Oil and Gas

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Saving the Salmon

Saving the Salmon

New publication from USGS documents results from a study which shows that infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus may become a major threat to farmed Atlantic salmon in other regions of the world where the virus has been, or may be, introduced.

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Fisheries Research

USGS scientists study life history, population ecology, and conservation and restoration strategies for aquatic species and the habitats that sustain them.

Connectivity & Ecological Flows

Aquatic Health

Aquatic Communities

Advanced Technologies and Tools

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News

Date published: February 1, 2018

Western Fisheries Science News, December 2017 | Issue 5.12

USGS Expertise and Science Leads to Ballast Water Management Solutions

Date published: December 13, 2017

Western Fisheries Science News, November 2017 | Issue 5.11

USGS and Chinese Fish Health Specialists Meet in the People's Republic of China to Discuss Fish Health

Date published: November 21, 2017

Western Fisheries Science News, October 2017 | Issue 5.10

Scientists Continue to Gain Insights into Endangered Suckers in the Klamath Basin

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Date published: May 2, 2018
Status: Active

Remote Sensing

USGS is using remote sensing of Fisheries and Aquatic Communities to monitor and assess fish populations and aquatic communities.

Date published: May 2, 2018
Status: Active

Data Visualization

USGS aquatic scientists are developing data visualization tools to assist
natural resource managers in decision‐making and adaptive management.

Date published: May 2, 2018
Status: Active

Statistical Modeling

The USGS is incorporating different species and aquatic communities into statistical models to begin developing tools that quantify relationships between flow and total ecosystem services provided by river systems for human benefit. 

Date published: May 2, 2018
Status: Active

Genetics and Genomics

USGS aquatic scientists develop and adapt new technologies and tools that increase the effectiveness, efficiency, safety, and accuracy of aquatic ecosystem management.

Date published: May 2, 2018
Status: Active

Fish Tagging and Tracking

USGS Fisheries scientists apply advanced technologies to monitor and assess fish populations and aquatic communities.

Date published: May 1, 2018
Status: Active

Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems

USGS Fisheries scientists examine the physiology, life history, reproduction, and habitat needs of aquatic species to assist managers to develop techniques to understand, conserve, and restore fish communities.

Date published: May 1, 2018
Status: Active

Pollution in Aquatic Ecosystems

USGS scientists quantify and describe functional relationships among aquatic species and habitats to characterize aquatic community structure, function, adaptation, and sustainability.

Date published: May 1, 2018
Status: Active

Invasive Species and Disease

USGS provides fisheries research information to restore and enhance fish habitat and understand fish diseases. Endangered species and those that are imperiled receive special research interest. Aquatic Invasive Species research is aiding in early detection and control measures, as well as understanding impacts these invaders have on aquatic environments.

Date published: May 1, 2018
Status: Active

Land and Water Management

USGS research in advanced technologies, use of remote sensing, and research and monitoring in large river systems across the U.S. uniquely positions the USGS Fisheries Program to contribute to practical applications of landscape science.

Date published: May 1, 2018
Status: Active

Drought and Aquatic Ecosystems

As part of the USGS Fisheries program, ecological flows, or the relationships between quality, quantity, and timing of water flows and ecological response of aquatic biota and ecosystems; and related ecosystem services are being investigated. 

Date published: May 1, 2018
Status: Active

Climate Change and Aquatic Ecosystems

USGS scientists quantify and describe functional relationships among aquatic species and habitats to describe aquatic community structure, function, adaptation, and sustainability. Research is conducted that links biology, population genetic diversity, and organism health for fish, native mussels, and other aquatic organisms in relation to their habitat requirements.

Date published: May 1, 2018
Status: Active

Energy Development and Aquatic Ecosystems

USGS is advancing science on the impacts of energy development on aquatic ecosystems.

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Date published: July 27, 2017

An Online Database for IHN Virus in Pacific Salmonid Fish: MEAP-IHNV

The Molecular Epidemiology of Aquatic Pathogens (MEAP)-IHNV Database

The MEAP-IHNV database provides access to detailed data for anyone interested in IHNV molecular epidemiology, such as fish health professionals, fish culture facility managers, and academic researchers.

Date published: October 31, 2016

USGS Dam Removal Information Portal (DRIP)

The Dam Removal Information Portal is a Web site that serves information about the scientific studies associated with dam-removal projects. It is a visualization tool, including a map and interactive charts, of a dam-removal literature review designed and developed by a working group at the USGS John Wesley Powell Center for Analysis and...

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Date published: May 2, 2016

Fishery Information and Technology Software

Software from the American Fisheries Society

Filter Total Items: 263
Asian carp removal in Missouri
February 23, 2018

Asian Carp Removal in Missouri

In 2018, USGS and partners completed an incredible feat against a harmful aquatic invasive species when over 240,000 pounds of invasive Silver Carp and Bighead Carp were removed from Creve Coeur Lake in Maryland Heights, Missouri.

October 31, 2017

USGS Hammond Bay Biological Station Building Demo Time Lapse Video

Out with the old, in with the new! A state-of-the-art aquatic science laboratory is being built on the shores of Lake Huron at the USGS Hammond Bay Biological Station (HBBS), one of seven field stations of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center, operated in partnership with the Great Lakes Fishery Commission. To make way for the new laboratory, four old buildings on the HBBS property needed to be...

Woman leaning over collecting sturgeon free embryos outside
June 30, 2017

Collecting Sturgeon Free Embryos

A biological science technician collects pallid sturgeon free embryos from the sampling nets in the experimental streams at the Columbia Environmental Research Center.

A female scientists overlooks swimming chambers for pallid sturgeon
June 30, 2017

Preparing Swim Chambers

A biological science technician prepares the swim chambers to assess the swimming abilities of young pallid sturgeon.

Logs and debris floating in a river
June 12, 2017

Logs and Debris in the Yellowstone River

Logs and debris are a common occurrence during recent high flows in the Yellowstone River.

Person placing a pallid sturgeon into the water from the side of a boat.
June 1, 2017

Releasing a Pallid Sturgeon on the Yellowstone River

Student Services contractor, Tanner, Cox releasing a pallid sturgeon on the Yellowstone River. 

Female scientist looking through microscope.
April 30, 2017

Examining Pallid Sturgeon Eggs

Biological science aid, Marlee Malmborg, examines and records the viability of pallid sturgeon eggs at the Columbia Environmental Research Center.

September 6, 2016

USGS Hammond Bay Biological Station Renovation — Time Lapse

Watch as the USGS Hammond Bay Biological Station water tank and pump house are constructed from the ground up! This short video features time lapse photography of the 1-million gallon water tank and pump house constructed to supply water to a state-of-the-art aquatic science laboratory. Laboratory construction will occur over the next several years and will also be chronicled with time lapse...

August 25, 2016

E2 West Transect – 2016

Permanent Site: E2 West Transect; Depth: 14.6 Meters (47.8 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 0.9 Kilometers (0.5 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 5 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15653002, -123.56197605; Site Description: This is one of our deeper sites. Substrate is mainly gravel/cobble with scattered boulders. A few small red and brown seaweeds, mainly acid kelp Desmarestia spp. (0:...

August 25, 2016

E2 East Transect – 2016

Permanent Site: E2 East Transect; Depth: 14.3 Meters (46.8 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 0.9 Kilometers (0.5 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 5 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15653002,-123.56130401; Site Description: This is one of our deeper sites. Substrate is mainly gravel/cobble with an occasional boulder. A few brown acid kelps (Desmarestia spp. at 0:06 seconds) and red...

August 24, 2016

D2 West Transect – 2016

Permanent Site: D2 West Transect; Depth: 12.8 Meters (41.9 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 0.3 Kilometers (0.2 Miles); Pre/Post Dam Removal: 5 years post-dam removal Lat/Long: 48.15233001,-123.56896603; Site Description: This site is right off the mouth of the river. Substrate is mainly gravel with some cobble. Dead clam shells are scattered everywhere (2:14 seconds). Small woody debris is...

August 24, 2016

J1 West Transect – 2016

Permanent Site: J1 West Transect; Depth: 9.8 Meters (32.3 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 6.6 Kilometers (4.1 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 5 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.13607725,-123.48002186; Site Description: This site is medium depth. Substrate is mainly a gravel/sand mixture. Both red (0:25 seconds) and brown seaweed growth is dense and appears to be at pre-dam removal...

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Date published: February 1, 2018

Western Fisheries Science News, December 2017 | Issue 5.12

USGS Expertise and Science Leads to Ballast Water Management Solutions

Date published: December 13, 2017

Western Fisheries Science News, November 2017 | Issue 5.11

USGS and Chinese Fish Health Specialists Meet in the People's Republic of China to Discuss Fish Health

Date published: November 21, 2017

Western Fisheries Science News, October 2017 | Issue 5.10

Scientists Continue to Gain Insights into Endangered Suckers in the Klamath Basin

Date published: October 25, 2017

Western Fisheries Science News, September 2017 | Issue 5.9

Conducting Risk Assessments for the Reintroduction of Salmon in the Upper Columbia River

Date published: September 18, 2017

Western Fisheries Science News, August 2017 | Issue 5.8

Science to Support Salmon Recovery Efforts in the Puget Sound

Date published: July 20, 2017

Western Fisheries Science News, July 2017 | Issue 5.7

In Memoriam - Dr. William "Dave" Woodson, 1956-2017

Date published: July 12, 2017

Western Fisheries Science News, June 2017 | Issue 5.6

Dr. Diane Elliott Retires After Long Distinguished Career

Date published: June 15, 2017

Western Fisheries Science News, May 2017 | Issue 5.5

Exploring the Role of Non-Native American Shad in the Columbia River Basin

Date published: May 15, 2017

Western Fisheries Science News, April 2017 | Issue 5.4

Dr. Jim Winton Retires After Long Distinguished Career

Date published: April 6, 2017

Western Fisheries Science News, March 2016 | Issue 4.3

Understanding the Effects of Temperature on Diseases in Fish

Date published: April 4, 2017

Western Fisheries Science News, March 2017 | Issue 5.3

Early Detection Monitoring May Not Be Sufficient for Invasive Mussels in the Columbia River Basin

Date published: March 13, 2017

Water managers explore new strategies to protect fish in California’s Bay Delta

The water in the Delta arrives primarily from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, supplying water for more than 22 million people. This water source supports California’s trillion-dollar economy—the sixth largest in the world—and its $27 billion agricultural industry.

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