Fisheries Program

Home

Our fisheries researchers are world-class scientists. They conduct cutting-edge research to provide fisheries resource managers the scientific information they need to protect, restore, and enhance our Nation’s fisheries and their habitats.

EMA Animal Welfare Assurance Website

Imperiled Species Research

Imperiled Species Research

Forty percent of all fish species in North America are at risk of extinction. USGS research is crucial to protect and manage at-risk species and healthy fish populations into the future.

Learn More

Drought and Ecological Flows

Drought and Ecological Flows

As part of the USGS Fisheries program, ecological flows, or the relationships between quality, quantity, and timing of water flows and ecological response of aquatic biota and ecosystems; and related ecosystem services are being investigated.

Find Out More

View Our Fisheries Research

View Our Fisheries Research

USGS scientists study life history, population ecology, and conservation and restoration strategies for aquatic species and the habitats that sustain them.

View by Theme

News

Date published: April 30, 2021

Media Alert: Portions of Missouri River to change color temporarily as USGS releases dye to study endangered pallid sturgeon

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey will conduct a dye-trace assessment. For a few hours during this research, several miles of the Missouri river will appear reddish due to non-toxic dye. The red color will dissipate rapidly and will disappear after it travels several miles downstream. During the study, USGS will deploy several boats on the river to monitor how and where the dye moves

Date published: April 7, 2021

USGS, Southern Illinois University researchers advance genome mapping for critically-endangered sturgeon

This scientific advancement can lead to the development of new genetic markers that will help scientists distinguish between pallid sturgeon and the shovelnose sturgeon, another sturgeon species that looks similar but is more common.

Date published: March 13, 2017

Water managers explore new strategies to protect fish in California’s Bay Delta

The water in the Delta arrives primarily from the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, supplying water for more than 22 million people. This water source supports California’s trillion-dollar economy—the sixth largest in the world—and its $27 billion agricultural industry.

Publications

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

Monitoring native, resident nonsalmonids for the incidence of gas bubble trauma downstream of Snake and Columbia River Dams, 2021

In 2020, a new spill program was implemented to aid the downstream passage of juvenile salmonids at mainstem dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers. Under this program, the total dissolved gas (TDG) cap was increased to 125% and monitoring of native, resident nonsalmonid (NRN) fishes for gas bubble trauma (GBT) became a requirement. The primary...

Tiffan, Kenneth; Smith, Collin; Eller, Nicole Joy; Warren, Joe J.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

Behavior and survival of hatchery rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the upper Cowlitz River Basin, Washington, 2013 and 2017

A two-year study (2013 and 2017) was conducted to determine if annual releases of hatchery rainbow trout (resident Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the upper Cowlitz River Basin, Washington adversely affected anadromous fish in the basin. Rainbow trout tagged with radio transmitters were monitored after release to describe movement patterns, entrainment...

Hansen, Amy C.; Kock, Tobias J.; Ekstrom, Brian K.; Liedtke, Theresa L.
Hansen, A.C., Kock, T.J., Ekstrom, B.K., and Liedtke, T.L., 2021, Behavior and survival of hatchery rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the upper Cowlitz River Basin, Washington, 2013 and 2017 (ver. 1.1, September 2021): U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2021–1085, 14 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20211085.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2021

Water quality, instream habitat, and the distribution of suckers in the upper Lost River watershed of Oregon and California, summer 2018

Executive SummaryEndangered Lost River (Deltistes luxatus) and shortnose (Chasmistes brevirostris) suckers primarily use lotic habitats during the spring spawning season in the Upper Klamath Lake watershed. However, summer-time surveys of the upper Lost River watershed in 1972, 1975 and 1989–90 indicated that adults of both endangered species use...

Martin, Barbara A.; Burdick, Summer M.; Staiger, Stephen T.; Kelsey, Caylen M.
Martin, B.A., Burdick, S.M., Staiger, S.T., and Kelsey, C., 2021, Water quality, instream habitat, and the distribution of suckers in the upper Lost River watershed of Oregon and California, summer 2018: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2021–1077, 29 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20211077.