Coastal Habitats

Science Center Objects

USGS scientists quantify and describe functional relationships among aquatic species in coastal habitats to characterize aquatic community structure, function, adaptation, and sustainability.

Learn more about our research by visiting the web pages below.

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Estuary Utilization by Juvenile Chinook Salmon

Science Center: Western Fisheries Research Center

Little is known about the importance of estuarine habitats for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha); hence managers are uncertain of the appropriate levels of protection for such habitats.

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Elwha River Restoration

Science Center: Western Fisheries Research Center

Coastal and river habitats throughout Puget Sound are simultaneously affected by a wide variety of human activities occurring over the landscape. The DOI Elwha River Restoration Project is a historic step to reestablishing the physical and biological processes critical to maintaining the Elwha ecosystem and native anadromous fisheries.

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Louisiana Barrier Island Habitat Mapping and Change Assessment

Science Center: Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

Barrier islands provide numerous invaluable ecosystem goods and services including storm protection and erosion control for the mainland, habitat for fish and wildlife, salinity regulation in estuaries, carbon sequestration in marshes, recreation, and tourism.

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Coastal Ecosystem Response to Sea-level Rise

Science Center: Western Ecological Research Center (WERC)

The Coastal Ecosystem Response to Climate Change (CERCC) program’s goal is to understand how ecosystems vary in their ability to keep up with sea-level rise.

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Food Web and Invertebrate Ecology Studies in Pacific Coast Estuaries

Science Center: Western Ecological Research Center (WERC)

Invertebrate communities provide food for several economically and ecologically important fish and waterbird species in coastal estuaries.

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Kelp Forest Community Ecology

Science Center: Western Ecological Research Center (WERC)

The near shore waters along the coast of southern California host one of the most productive marine ecosystems on earth: giant kelp forests. These complex environments provide habitat, food, and hiding places for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals, but are easily disturbed by both natural events and human activities.

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