Fish Physiology and Behavior

Science Center Objects

USGS research focuses on fish physiology and behavioral characteristics, vulnerability assessments, and development of indicator tools that can be used to inform decisions with the goal of sustaining and enhancing fisheries resources in concert with human uses.

Learn more about our research by visiting the web pages below.

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Conservation Engineering

Science Center: Leetown Science Center

Engineering has an important role to play in the conservation of migratory fish species.  As a result of anthropogenic development on river systems, full and partial barriers to fish movement commonly exist in watersheds worldwide.  

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Fish Behavior

Science Center: Leetown Science Center

Recent discoveries of the extent of sturgeon movement in the Gulf of Maine combined with relicensing and water use issues in the Connecticut River demand closer evaluation of shortnose and Atlantic sturgeon migration and behavior patterns. 

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Fish Biomechanics

Science Center: Leetown Science Center

Biomechanics is the study of mechanical laws relating to the movement of living organisms. In regards to fish, biomechanics pertains to the body shape of different species and the various structures of fish muscles, fins, etc. 

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Fish Physiology

Science Center: Leetown Science Center

Physiological demands are especially important to anadromous fish because of their need to move between freshwater and seawater and to make long, often difficult migrations. These demands can become critical when barriers to migration and other changes in river ecosystems occur. 

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Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon Life History Investigations

Science Center: Western Fisheries Research Center

Serial releases of radio and PIT-tagged fish are being made in the Clearwater River to study changes in migration behavior over time. Data are analyzed to estimate survival between different reservoir reaches, rates of residualization, travel times, and mortality. Mobile tracking of tagged fish is conducted to obtain fate information on fish that delay migration in specific reaches.

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Which way did they go? Using acoustic telemetry to track fish movement throughout the Great Lakes

Science Center: Great Lakes Science Center

Acoustic telemetry is an advanced technology that allows researchers to track fish movement throughout a water body. Acoustic receivers are deployed in an array throughout a study area, which for the GLSC is a large portion of the Great Lakes. 

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Wind River Watershed

Science Center: Western Fisheries Research Center

Snorkel and electrofishing surveys are conducted to estimate population density and biomass of juvenile steelhead as well as introduced populations of brook trout and Chinook salmon in Trout Creek, upper Wind River, and Panther Creek watersheds. 

 

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