Restoration of Aquatic Ecosystems

Science Center Objects

USGS Fisheries scientists examine the physiology, life history, reproduction, and habitat needs of aquatic species to assist managers to develop techniques to understand, conserve, and restore fish communities.

Learn more about our research by visiting the web pages below.

Line

Spatial Patterns of Native Freshwater Mussels in the Upper Mississippi River

Science Center: Upper Midwest Environmental Science Center

This research aims to quantify spatial patterns of adult and juvenile (≤5 y of age) freshwater mussels across multiple scales based on systematic survey data from 4 reaches of the Upper Mississippi River (Navigation Pools 3, 5, 6, and 18).

Line

Genetic Population Structure of Lake Whitefish in Lake Huron

Science Center: Great Lakes Science Center

While most coregonid populations in the Great Lakes have been greatly depleted from historical levels, lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) populations have increased in Lake Huron during the late 1900s, possibly as a consequence of the restoration of top predators. However, recent declines in biomass and condition of lake whitefish (particularly in the main basin) have raised concerns about the overall health of the resource. 

Line

Natural Lake Trout Strain Identification in Lake Huron

Science Center: Great Lakes Science Center

Lake trout were extirpated from the Great Lakes as a result of habitat alteration, commercial over-harvest, and sea lamprey predation.  Considerable financial commitments have been made to restore lake trout to the Great Lakes by stocking, habitat restoration, and sea lamprey control.  Today, lake trout rehabilitation is still one of the primary goals of restoration and management programs.  

Line

Population Restoration

Science Center: Great Lakes Science Center

Modification of Great Lakes environments has adversely affected native biodiversity through dramatic reductions in abundance and local extinction of many native species. To remediate past effects on native biodiversity, the USGS-GLSC is restoring populations of multiple native species in the Great Lakes. 

Line

Gulf Sturgeon Ecological Investigations

Science Center: Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

The Gulf sturgeon, Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi, has been listed as Threatened since 1991. Beginning in 1986, USGS has been investigating sturgeon population abundance and ecology throughout its range, but mostly in the Suwannee River.

Line

Evaluating the reintroduction potential and limiting factors associated with anadromous fish reintroductions in the Upper Lewis River, WA

Science Center: Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Hydropower facilities on the Lewis River, WA eliminated historic runs of anadromous species to the headwaters of the Lewis River. As anadromous reintroductions are considered and implemented, there remains considerable uncertainty in the viability of reintroductions in reservoir and tributary systems where large populations of non-native species persist and where spawning and rearing habitat may be limited. 

Line

Elwha River Restoration-Aquatic Ecology

Science Center: Western Fisheries Research Center

Coastal and river habitats throughout Puget Sound are simultaneously affected by a wide variety of human activities occurring over the landscape. The DOI Elwha River Restoration Project is a historic step to reestablishing the physical and biological processes critical to maintaining the Elwha ecosystem and native anadromous fisheries. 

Line

Wind River Watershed

Science Center: Western Fisheries Research Center

Snorkel and electrofishing surveys are conducted to estimate population density and biomass of juvenile steelhead as well as introduced populations of brook trout and Chinook salmon in Trout Creek, upper Wind River, and Panther Creek watersheds. Extensive PIT-tagging of juvenile steelhead has occurred. 

Line

Long Term Resource Monitoring

Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program

The mission of the Long Term Resource Monitoring element is to support decision makers with the information and understanding needed to maintain the Upper Mississippi River System as a viable multiple-use river ecosystem.

Line

USGS science supporting the Elwha River Restoration Project

The role of the USGS in this restoration project is to provide scientific monitoring and analyses of the fish, waters, and sediment, before, during, and after this historic event.

Line

Dam removal: synthesis of ecological and physical responses

Powell Center Working Group Project

Dam decommissioning is rapidly emerging as an important river restoration strategy in the U.S., with several major removals recently completed or in progress. But few studies have evaluated the far-reaching consequences of these significant environmental perturbations, especially those resulting from removals of large (>10-15 m tall) structures during the last decade. In particular, interactions between physical and ecological aspects of dam removal are poorly known. 

 

⇒ Return to Aquatic Ecosystem Conservation