Statistical Modeling

Science Center Objects

The USGS is incorporating different species and aquatic communities into statistical models to begin developing tools that quantify relationships between flow and total ecosystem services provided by river systems for human benefit. 

Learn more about our research by visiting the web pages below.

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Bioenergetics of Great Lakes Fishes

Science Center: Great Lakes Science Center

Fish bioenergetics modeling, which involves quantification of the fish's energy budget, has played an important role in managing Great Lakes fisheries, as well as other fisheries around the world. 

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Investigate the Interactions Between Stocked and Naturalized Populations of Various Fish Species

Science Center: Columbia Environmental Research Center

Because all stocked fish are marked, we have the unique opportunity to investigate trends of stocked and naturalized populations of lake trout in Jackson Lake with the use of bioenergetic modeling of fish populations.

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Evaluating the linkages between regional climate patterns, local climate data, and native Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) and non-native brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) growth, survival, and life-history expressions

Science Center: Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

We are collecting empirical temperature climate data to develop local models describing stream temperature and streamflows in headwater streams in Spread Creek, a Tributary to the Upper Snake River, WY. 

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Fish Ecology

Science Center: Leetown Science Center

Our goal is to identify the factors that govern population dynamics. Emphasis is on an integrative approach, combining field and laboratory studies to provide data for mathematical models of ecological and evolutionary dynamics.

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WaterSMART: Improving Tools for Assessing and Forecasting Ecological Responses to Hydrologic Alteration

Science Center: Wetland and Aquatic Research Center

The ecology teams quantitatively sample fish and mussels semiannually in the spring and fall, while simultaneously collecting flow and water-quality parameters. The goal is to eventually associate ecological transistional stages (recruitment, colonization, extirpation), based on spatially replicated occupancy models, with hydrologic flows under different conditions and in different physiographic regions or across a geographical gradient.

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Predicting climate change effects on aquatic ecosystems in the Crown of the Continent

Science Center: Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

The project is integrating downscaled and regionalized climate models (e.g., stream temperature) with riverscape data, fine-scale aquatic species vulnerability assessments, population genetic connectivity, and remotely sensed riparian and aquatic habitat connectivity analyses. 

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Development and Application of Mechanistic Models of Stream Fish Population Persistence

Science Center: Leetown Science Center

Our goal is to understand the mechanisms responsible for population dynamics in flowing waters and to provide managers with tools to evaluate alternative management scenarios, effects of habitat fragmentation, changes in stream flow, and likely effects of climate change on persistence of populations. This kind of analysis can best be done with detailed mechanistic models, but these models require extensive data and advanced estimation procedures.

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Broad spatial population models

Science Center: Leetown Science Center

A new class of statistical model allows estimation of key demographic rates based on fish samples from typical monitoring protocols using untagged and unmarked fish. Key demographic rates include survival, immigration and recruitment. 

 

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