Sage-grouse & Sagebrush Ecosystem

News

News releases about USGS sage-grouse and sagebrush steppe science are listed below.

Filter Total Items: 23
Date published: October 28, 2019

People of the Sage

Meet one of the People of the Sage, Dr. Anna Chalfoun, Assistant USGS Cooperative Research Unit Leader and Associate Professor at the University of Wyoming. Don’t let the titles intimidate you, Anna Chalfoun loves all types of hockey, loves horses—all animals really! Even snakes.

Date published: July 25, 2019

Big Sagebrush Recovery After Fire Inhibited by its Own Biology

Plant age drives mortality, reproductive success and population dynamics

Date published: February 1, 2019

Long-term Studies Reveal Climate Adaptation Patterns of Big Sagebrush

To understand plant genetic diversity and adaptations, scientist often conduct “common garden” experiments growing plants with diverse origins under the same soil and climatic conditions. However, most common garden studies may be too short to detect adaptive differences. Understanding climate adaptation of Wyoming Big Sagebrush could improve restoration strategies and success.

Date published: December 14, 2018

Guide to Bees of Southern Idaho

Bees are an important part of natural ecosystems and thriving agricultural systems in southwest Idaho and other areas of the United States. Both introduced and native bees can provide ecosystem services by pollinating native plants and agricultural crops such as fruit trees. 

Date published: November 2, 2018

Effects of Disturbance on Vascular Plants and Biocrusts in Sagebrush Steppe

Semi-arid sagebrush ecosystems experience chronic disturbances through grazing, invasive grasses, and acute disturbance of fire. Biocrusts, a community of cyanobacteria, mosses, and lichens, develop on soil surfaces and contribute to the land’s resistance to invasive plants. 

Date published: October 26, 2018

Protocol for Describing Indicators of Rangeland Health

Assessing rangeland health is useful from a land management perspective in providing a baseline or early indicator of degradation and for prioritizing habitat across a landscape for restoration.

Date published: October 5, 2018

A Database Tool for Estimating Fuel Loadings Across a Range of Intact to Degraded Sagebrush Habitats in Southern Idaho

USGS researchers created an interactive Fuels Guide and Database, providing vegetation and fuel loading information and photographs for big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) ecological sites in the Morley Nelson Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area (NCA) in southern Idaho.

Date published: September 28, 2018

Sagebrush Steppe Resilience and the Interaction of Climate and Management

Invasive grass species are a threat to many ecosystems around the world and in sagebrush habitats of the western United States, presence of non-native grasses may give rise to fire cycles that lead to a loss of sagebrush and a dominance of invasive cheatgrass.

Date published: March 21, 2017

Livestock grazing effects on sage-grouse: study identifies options to sustain ranching and help wildlife

Effects of livestock grazing on greater sage-grouse populations can be positive or negative depending on the amount of grazing and when grazing occurs, according to research published today in Ecological Applications. The research was conducted by scientists from the United States Geological Survey, Colorado State University and Utah State University.

Date published: February 14, 2017

Handbook for sagebrush steppe restoration techniques can help sustain wildlife and western ecosystems

The sagebrush ecosystem in the western U.S is one of the largest ecosystems in North America, but it is also threatened from wildfire and invasive plants. “Restoration of these unique ecosystems will help sustain wildlife and livelihoods throughout the West," said David Pyke, the USGS ecologist and lead author of the final installment of a three-part sagebrush restoration handbook. 

Date published: January 19, 2017

Managing 246 million acres: new science-based tools support Bureau of Land Management’s landscape approach

The U.S. Geological Survey and the Bureau of Land Management today released a collaborative report with new information and tools to support effective management of millions of acres of BLM public lands.  The report underscores the value of a landscape approach to management, and shows that the BLM manages some of the largest areas of intact public lands in the west.