Status and Trends Program

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To protect, conserve, and restore the living resources—plants, animals, habitats, ecosystems—entrusted to their care, land and resource managers must understand the condition, or status (e.g., abundance, distribution, productivity, health), of those resources as well as their trends (i.e., how these variables change over time).

Has Spring Sprung?

Has Spring Sprung?

The National Phenology Network (NPN) has released the gridded spring indices which map the results of modeling the progression of spring by leaf index.

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A New Way of Thinking About How Species Adapt

A New Way of Thinking About How Species Adapt

Through this conceptualization, we identify ecological attributes contributing to adaptive capacity (AC), outline areas of research necessary to advance understanding of AC, and provide examples.

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How Do Status & Trends Affect Me?

How Do Status & Trends Affect Me?

Status and trends information is critical to evaluating the effectiveness of specific management actions, validating research results and models, and promoting a broad understanding and appreciation of the natural resources that support our society.

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News

Date published: November 16, 2016

Small Alpine Insects are Big Messengers of Climate Change

West Glacier, Mont. – Two rare alpine insects – native to the northern Rocky Mountains and dependent on cold waters of glacier and snowmelt-fed alpine streams – are imperiled due to climate warming induced glacier and snow loss according to a study by the U.S. Geological Survey and its partners.

Date published: April 18, 2016

You, yes, you! Consider helping take the pulse of our planet

With the White House’s launch of CitizenScience.gov and the inaugural Citizen Science Day this Saturday April 16, 2016, the U.S. Geological Survey invites you to look into a landscape of opportunities to participate in science! 

Date published: July 30, 2014

Nesting Gulf Sea Turtles Feed in Waters Filled With Threats

Nesting loggerhead sea turtles in the northern Gulf of Mexico feed among areas that were oiled by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill and where human activities occur, several of which are known to pose threats to sea turtles, a new U.S Geological study showed.

Filter Total Items: 68
Date published: March 6, 2018
Status: Active

Alpine Wildlife and Snowpack Dynamics in the North Cascades

Mountain ecosystems are expected to change with continued reductions in annual snowpack that have been observed worldwide over the past half-century. Recent snow droughts in North America have been attributed to unusually warm temperatures that cause winter precipitation to fall as rain, rather than snow. Many species of alpine wildlife depend on snowpack for insulation from extreme cold and...

Date published: February 28, 2018
Status: Active

Vulnerability Assessment Frameworks

The USGS Status and Trends program assesses ecological patterns and processes within important ecological systems to understand complex environmental controls over species and ecosystems, and their vulnerability to internal and external stressors and drivers.

 

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 28, 2018
Status: Active

Contaminants

Health status can often affect the size and distribution of plant and animals population across landscapes. 

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 28, 2018
Status: Active

Sea-Level Rise

Coastal ecosystems greatly influence the livelihood and resilience of coastal communities and cities to external stressors such as storms or sea level change.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 28, 2018
Status: Active

Fire

Successful restoration or rehabilitation of degraded species, habitats and ecosystems requires assessments of the status and trends of the impacted system before, during and after restoration. In addition, an ecological understanding is required to inform changes in resource management activities to support restoration, as well as to assess the relative success of the restoration and to adjust...

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 26, 2018
Status: Active

Decision Frameworks

Decision frameworks bring science and stakeholders needs together to determine the best way to manage natural resources.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 26, 2018
Status: Active

Biological Collections

Biological collections provide critical data to assess the history of the status, population trends, and abundance of the plants and animals around us. 

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 26, 2018
Status: Active

Citizen Science

Citizen science — scientific work undertaken by members of the general public, usually in collaboration with scientific institutions — is a grassroots approach to natural science. It educates and engages the public by encouraging ordinary citizens to use their interests and their talents in tackling a wide range of real-world problems. 

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 26, 2018
Status: Active

Ecosystem Services

Ecosystem services are the benefits that ecosystems provide that are valued by human users such as food, fresh water, and cultural services. Ecosystems also provide marketable goods like seafood and timber.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 26, 2018
Status: Active

Adaptive Assessments

The Status and Trends program is using adaptive assessments to understand the current condition of plants, animals, and habitats then structuring management decisions around the information learned.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 22, 2018
Status: Active

Data Analysis, Synthesis, and Delivery

The Status and Trends program provides research, technological tools, and decision support to meet the science needs of the Nation's resource managers to conserve and protect aquatic species, communities, and habitats.

Contacts: Jake F Weltzin
Date published: February 15, 2018
Status: Active

Biological Survey Unit

Scientists and staff of the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center stationed at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) do research on the systematics and conservation of vertebrate species and curate and manage the North American collections of Amphibian, Reptile, Bird, and Mammal specimens and associated records.

Filter Total Items: 3
Date published: March 1, 2018

NPN Visualization Tool

Phenology map viewer from the National Phenology Network.

Date published: February 8, 2017

The North American Breeding Bird Survey, Results and Analysis 1966 - 2015

This website presents population change information for more than 400 species of North American birds, as estimated from the North American Breeding Bird Survey. Estimates of trend (interval-specific estimates of population change), annual indices of abundance, and maps of abundance and population change for these species are presented for a variety of regions.

Date published: March 4, 2016

The National Phenology Database

The database houses contemporary and historical data on organismal phenology across the nation. These data are being used in a number of applications for science, conservation and resource management. Customizable data downloads using specific dates, regions, species and phenophases, are freely available.

Filter Total Items: 10
February 28, 2018

Bee Laboratory (Instagram Story)

Instagram story showing the USGS Bee Inventory and Monitoring Lab clearing invasive species from a field.

Hoary marmots can be seen near large boulders in alpine meadows from Washington to Alaska.
September 13, 2017

Hoary marmots

Hoary marmots can be seen near large boulders in alpine meadows from Washington to Alaska. 

American pika in the Northern Cascades. American pikas occupy talus slopes in mountain ecosystems throughout western NA.
August 8, 2017

American pika in the Northern Cascades.

American pika in the Northern Cascades. American pikas occupy talus slopes in mountain ecosystems throughout western North America.

Research team in the Northern Cascades.
July 7, 2016

USGS - NOROCK Research team in the Northern Cascades.

USGS - NOROCK field team in the Northern Cascades studying Hoary marmots and American pika and snowpack dynamics.  

Sampling for alpine insects above the stream in Glacier National Park.
September 21, 2015

Sampling for alpine insects above the stream in Glacier National Park.

A scientist is working to collect alpine insects by picking through moss below tiny, cold, alpine streams. This spot was below a small seep on a slope above a tributary to the Dry Fork, North of the Two Medicine area in Glacier National Park. 

Looking out the mouth of Reynolds Glacier in Glacier National Park.
September 24, 2014

Looking out the mouth of Reynolds Glacier in Glacier National Park.

Looking out the mouth of Reynolds Glacier in Glacier National Park. Glacier National Park is iconic of the combined impacts of climate change and snow and ice loss – over 80 percent of the park’s glaciers have been lost since the mid-19th century.

Glacial fed alpine stream in Glacier National Park.
August 8, 2013

Glacial fed alpine stream in Glacier National Park.

Scientists sample for alpine insects in streams like this near Blackfoot Glacier in Glacier National Park. Alpine streams environments in the northern Rocky Mountains are especially vulnerable to climate change due to rapid warming resulting in loss of glaciers and snowpack. Glacier National Park is iconic of the combined impacts of climate change and snow and ice loss – over 80 percent of the...

A glacier stonefly (Zapada glacier) on a snowy backdrop in Glacier National Park.
July 24, 2013

Western glacier stonefly on a snowy backdrop in Glacier National Park

A glacier stonefly (Zapada glacier) on a snowy backdrop in Glacier National Park. The species is threatened by climate warming induced glacier and snow loss and has been petitioned for protection under the U.S. Endangered Species Act due to climate-change-induced habitat loss.

A meltwater stonefly larva (Lednia tumana) sits on a cobbled snow fed stream in Glacier National Park.
August 27, 2010

A meltwater stonefly larva (Lednia tumana)

A meltwater stonefly larva (Lednia tumana) sits on a cobbled snow fed stream in Glacier National Park. The species is threatened by climate warming induced glacier and snow loss and has been petitioned for protection under the U.S. Endangered Species Act due to climate-change-induced habitat loss.

Filter Total Items: 3
Date published: November 16, 2016

Small Alpine Insects are Big Messengers of Climate Change

West Glacier, Mont. – Two rare alpine insects – native to the northern Rocky Mountains and dependent on cold waters of glacier and snowmelt-fed alpine streams – are imperiled due to climate warming induced glacier and snow loss according to a study by the U.S. Geological Survey and its partners.

Date published: April 18, 2016

You, yes, you! Consider helping take the pulse of our planet

With the White House’s launch of CitizenScience.gov and the inaugural Citizen Science Day this Saturday April 16, 2016, the U.S. Geological Survey invites you to look into a landscape of opportunities to participate in science! 

Date published: July 30, 2014

Nesting Gulf Sea Turtles Feed in Waters Filled With Threats

Nesting loggerhead sea turtles in the northern Gulf of Mexico feed among areas that were oiled by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill and where human activities occur, several of which are known to pose threats to sea turtles, a new U.S Geological study showed.