About the Status and Trends Program

The Status and Trends Program concentrates research efforts on two science priorities: timely and effective management of species, particularly those that cross-jurisdictional, migratory, or of management concern, and effective and efficient management of lands and waters, particularly habitats within protected areas that provide support to species of management concern.

The Status and Trends Program provides science, technology, and information that resource managers use to understand the current condition – or status – of plants, animals, and habitats under management responsibility of Interior bureaus and other Federal, State, and Tribal partners. Status information includes data, graphs, maps, and publications about the current activity, abundance, distribution and health of critical species and their habitats. The goal of the Program is to develop models and tools that can be used to evaluate outcomes of potential management actions, to better understand the effectiveness of management practices designed to improve conditions for key species, and to efficiently target limited time and resources to accomplish the desired management outcome.  In addition, the Program collects, analyzes, and delivers data and information about past and potential future changes to species and habitats.  

The Program provides essential information to resource managers charged with understanding and managing protected habitats and species, including National Wildlife Refuges, National Parks, and lands under BLM jurisdiction.  This Program concentrates research efforts on two science priorities: (1) timely and effective management of species, particularly those that cross-jurisdictional, migratory, or of critical management concern, and (2) effective and efficient management of lands and waters, particularly habitats within protected areas that provide support to species of management concern.  These research foci enable natural resource managers to effectively understand, manage, conserve, and restore trust species and trust habitats of management concern.  

The following short paragraphs highlight several current research programs that support these two focal areas:

The USGS provides data and information to support energy development across the West, including through the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative, a long-term, science-based program focused on assessing, conserving, and enhancing fish and wildlife habitats while facilitating energy development through local collaboration and partnerships, and the Restoration Assessment and Monitoring Program, a USGS-led activity that strengthens restoration and rehabilitation outcomes executed by Interior and other agencies by providing science and guidance on effective strategies.

USGS population assessments of migratory birds are used by National Flyway Councils to manage waterfowl hunting in the United States in cooperation with Canada and Mexico. Bird hunting and bird watching activities are substantial contributors to the U.S. economy. The USGS Bird Banding Laboratory and North American Breeding Bird Survey provide support for the management of harvested migratory gamebird populations and produce science-based population data on more than 400 bird species in North America.

The North American Bat Monitoring Program is a multi-national, multi-partner program led by USGS, designed to better document and understand patterns, causes, and consequences of changes in bat populations at local to national scales.

The National Phenology Network produces and delivers maps of real-time and forecasted plant and animal activity used by resource managers to predict and manage invasive species, insect pests, wildlife disease, recreational opportunities, and critical habitats within National Parks and Wildlife Refuges. In 2019, the Network will develop and deliver real-time and short-term forecasts of the activity of vectors of disease, such as ticks and mosquitos, to support public safety.

 

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