Status and Trends Program

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December 17, 2019

Megachile pugnata pomona, m, right, Mariposa, CA

A large hole nesting leaf cutter. This is a male Megachile pugnata (subspecies pomona) from Yosemite. Check out the greatly expanded pale segments of the front legs. These are used in mating and lain over the females eyes. People make up all sorts of stories with that information, but we really don't know that details about why that is a useful feature. A number of

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December 17, 2019

Osmia spinigera, f, west bank, side

Within regions of conflict the opinionless great wheel of Nature silently continues. From the West Bank comes a snail shell nesting Osmia loaded with pollen, sometimes included in its own Palaearctic genus Hoplosmia and sometimes...not. From the Packer lab Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin

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December 17, 2019

Chile species 8, f, back, Chile

Pseudagapostemon citricornis - More Chilean bees from Laurence Packer's expedition to southern Chile. Photographs by Kelly Graninger. Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin Macro Flash in Styrofoam Cooler, F5.0, ISO 100, Shutter Speed 200 USGSBIML Photoshopping Technique: Note that we

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December 17, 2019

Bombus morrisoni, m, right, Pennington Co., SD

Tightly wrapped in fur-like orange hair, this lovely western bumblebee (Bombus morrisoni) was captured at the far edge of its range in Badlands National Park in South Dakota. Near the Black Hills, an island of Rocky Mountain type habitat in a sea of prairie, the Badlands are receivers perhaps of bees that otherwise would not inhabit prairie habitats. Photo by Brooke

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December 17, 2019

Wasp, Face, Hardy CO, WV

Another specimen of the ichneumonid was shown earlier...lovely patterns of proportions of face and antennae. Photo taken by Colby Francoeur.Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin Macro Flash, F5.0, ISO 100, Shutter Speed 200, link to a .pdf of our set up is located in our profile

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December 17, 2019

Diadasia australis, m, face, Jackson Co., SD

Fuzzy, round-headed, and big are a pretty good short cut to the ID of Diadasia bees. Westerners, they, in a very casual pocket prairie sort of way make East of the Mississippi River. The bulk of the population is in dry natural areas from the middle prairies to the West. Here is a common one from our work in the Badlands of South Dakota. At times, you can find them

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December 17, 2019

Stenotritus pubescens, f, side, australia

Australia warning. This extremely fast flying sand nesting bee is only found in Australia, in fact, the genus is only found in Australia, and...the family Stenotritidae (27 species) is only found in Australia. The smallest of the 7 families of bees known to mankind. Collected by the peripatetic uber bee taxonomist Laurence Packer. Photography Information: Canon

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December 17, 2019

Andrena robertsonii, F, Side, MD, Boonesboro

A wee mining bee. Andrena robertsonii lives among the flowers, usually in mid to late spring, where it often lounges around gathering pollen on woody plants, things such as apples, roses, dogwoods, and sumacs. As most of you know it is super similar to A. brevipalpis, but I am not telling you anything new. This gal was collected near Boonesboro, Maryland in an open

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December 17, 2019

Macropis nuda, back, m, nh, veit powerline

Another Macropis from transmission lines from NH and MA. This species (M. nuda) is also a Lysimachia specialist and the female's bright white pollen carrying hairs and likely the hairs under the abdomen soak up oils which are used by the female to add to pollen to create the food for their young. Collected by Michael Veit and part of a study run by David Wagner.

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December 17, 2019

Andrena caerulea, f, back, Santa Barbara, CA

As its name implies, Andrena caerulae, is a bee with a deep blue shimmer to its skin. Unlike the plain black models of most of the other 500+ species of Andrena this species stands out, making identification a bit easier. In the face you can see the darkened patches of short hairs that line the depressions between eye, ocelli, and antennae (fovea) that characterize the

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