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December 17, 2019

Melitta

West Virginia, with a bit of mold on the pollen area

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December 17, 2019

myrtle warbler, wing, dc

The eastern subspecies of the Yellow-rumped warbler, Setophaga coronata. This bird ran into a building at night while it was migrating and was picked up by the Lights out DC group. Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin Macro Flash in Styrofoam Cooler, F5.0, ISO 100, Shutter Speed 200, link to a .pdf of our set up is

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December 17, 2019

Colletes phaceliae, f, side, Pennington Co, South Dakota

The bee genus Colletes...also known as Cellophane Bees because of their habitat of lining their cells with a plastic like substance...is full of relatively uncommon bees that specialist on a the pollen of a small number of plants or groups of plants. This may be the case with C. phaceliae given its name...but I am not clear. This bees was colleted at Badlands National

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December 17, 2019

Colletes aestivalis, f, back, Rockingham Co. VA

Colletes aestivalis. Rare? or Not Rare? This is a Heuchera specialist. Heuchera is planted everywhere, why is the species not seen and seen by some as a potential species of concern. A few things pilgrim. First most of the Heuchera out there are part of a hybrid Heuchera swarm (I like the ring of that phrase, but, sadly, it will not often come up in casual

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December 17, 2019

Lasioglossum nelumbonis, f, left side, Prince George's Co., MD

Wetland Bee. There are many bees in wetlands. Why? Because so many wetland plants have flowers that are designed to lure bees. Why, for example, are water lilies so large and colorful? So they look good in our pretend ponds? Nope. To attract bees out into the pond for a little pollination fun? Yup. And, here you will find Lasioglossum nelumbonis a waterlily bee

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December 17, 2019

rediviva, f, south africa, back

Rediviva species, Black Daddy Longlegs Oil Bee, collected in South Africa We showed the male already...here is the female.What fantastically cool bees! These bees have extremely long front legs that they use to collect oil from plants, using the oil instead of nectar as food for the larvae. At the end of their legs are sponge-like patches of hairs. When flying these

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December 17, 2019

Lasioglossum synthridis, F, Face, UT, Garfield County

From Bryce Canyon National Park comes a small Lasioglossum, similar to many other species of this specious genus. Western in distribution I know actually nothing about its life. Picture by Brooke Alexander. Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin Macro Flash in Styrofoam Cooler, F5.0, ISO 100,

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December 17, 2019

Andrena hilaris, F, face, Maryland, Anne Arundel County

A larger Andrena...about the size of a honey bee. A spring forager, not well studied, but shows up here and there throughout much of the deciduous forest landscape of the East south of New England. Photo by Kamren Jefferson. Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin Macro Flash in Styrofoam Cooler

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December 17, 2019

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One of the most common bees in the East...if only we could figure out how to identify it more easily. Here we have Lasioglossum trigeminum. Fits right in with A. admirandum, A. versatum, and A. callidum and I often struggle with dark second thoughts about the specimens Id, because of all the overlap. Photo by Erick Hernandez Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D,

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December 17, 2019

Anthophora urbana, f, right. Yolo Co., CA

Here is a series of males and females of Anthophora urbana from Yolo County, California. This bee was collected in the California Central Valley in Yolo County for research on small-scale restoration in agricultural areas. Claire Kremen's 10-year study of hedgerows shows the benefits of planting native shrubs and forbs in agricultural areas for native bees. Photos by

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