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December 17, 2019

Colletes aestivalis, f, back, Rockingham Co. VA

Colletes aestivalis. Rare? or Not Rare? This is a Heuchera specialist. Heuchera is planted everywhere, why is the species not seen and seen by some as a potential species of concern. A few things pilgrim. First most of the Heuchera out there are part of a hybrid Heuchera swarm (I like the ring of that phrase, but, sadly, it will not often come up in casual

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December 17, 2019

Elm Sawfly, face

Not 100% sure about this one, but seems likely that it is Cimbex americana, the elm sawfly, but in any case, quite the boss sawfly. There is something interesting going on here. If you meet some insects at a party and ask the question: Insect, show me your fluorescent orange parts they will only show you their antennae and their tarsal segments. Why? Perhaps a

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December 17, 2019

Hoplitis truncata, m, back, Prince George's Co., MD

Hoplitis truncata. An uncommon Hoplitis that shows up here and there, but never in large numbers. Not well known and its roll and preferences in the world of flowers is also unclear. This is a rather ratty male I collected somewhere near home...will have to keep my eyes open for additional specimens. Notice the little pointed tip on the ends of the antennae...something

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December 17, 2019

Lasioglossum nelumbonis, f, left side, Prince George's Co., MD

Wetland Bee. There are many bees in wetlands. Why? Because so many wetland plants have flowers that are designed to lure bees. Why, for example, are water lilies so large and colorful? So they look good in our pretend ponds? Nope. To attract bees out into the pond for a little pollination fun? Yup. And, here you will find Lasioglossum nelumbonis a waterlily bee

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December 17, 2019

Andrena-fragilis,-female,-side

Andrena fragilis, June 2012, Cecil County, Maryland

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December 17, 2019

Megachile inermis, female, back

Megachile inermis - A large female leaf cutter from Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore in Michigan. So many species out there, it just goes on and on. Picture taken by Sierra Williams, photoshopping by Elizabeth Garcia. Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin Macro Flash in Styrofoam Cooler

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December 17, 2019

mutillid, f,face, Millard county, Utah

Wicked Wasp Week. All week, All wasps. Witchy. Muttilids. Ah, here is one, such a group you would not want to meet if they were 10 feet tall. Check out the tarsal comb on this one from Great Basin National Park in Utah....perhaps used to pick the pieces of its victims out of its teeth. Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm

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December 17, 2019

Osmia spinigera, f, west bank, side

Within regions of conflict the opinionless great wheel of Nature silently continues. From the West Bank comes a snail shell nesting Osmia loaded with pollen, sometimes included in its own Palaearctic genus Hoplosmia and sometimes...not. From the Packer lab Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin

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December 17, 2019

Sap Beetle

Glischrochilus sanguinolentus - Another 10X shot, this of the head of a small little sap beetle that I found feeding on the cut end of a Boxelder in my backyard, apparently this beetle is fond of maples, their sap, and the associated fungi/bacteria growing on the sap. Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 200mm Pentax-m with Nikon 10X

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December 17, 2019

Triepeolus concavus, f, back, Pennington Co, South Dakota

Triepeolus concavus. Most Triepeolus bees are nest parasites of Melissodes, but a few interestingly have taken up with other groups of bees. This big one invades the nests of Svastra species...a group allied with Melissodes but a bit more robust and buff in their body. This one collected in Badlands National Park. One of many places on the Earth I consider as a

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December 17, 2019

Andrena helianthiformis, f, back, Pennington Co., SD

Echinacea. This medicinal plant is widely planted and tinkered with by gardeners and breeders. But, it really is a prairie species and when in its habitat, like the Badlands, big bees like to forage on it. Hey, look, here's one in this picture! Andrena helianthiformis. I suppose this means "looks like A. helianthus, but...is not" in Latin. Indeed this taxonomic feint

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