Status and Trends Program

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December 17, 2019

Agapostemon nasutus, m, face, Bagaces, Costa Rica

Gliding in from Costa Rica comes a moderalely large, moderately green bee. An Agapostemon nasutus. There are a lot of the these bright green bees out there...Not just in C.R. but throughout the Americas. Beautiful, and once you start paying attention, quite common. But are there any songs written about them? No. Poems? Zero. Green Bee Secret Societies? Nope. This

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December 17, 2019

Bombus morrisoni, f, face, Pennington Co., SD

Tightly wrapped in fur-like orange hair, this lovely western bumblebee was captured at the far edge of its range in Badlands National Park in South Dakota. Near the Black Hills, an island of Rocky Mountain type habitat in a sea of prairie, the Badlands are receivers perhaps of bees that otherwise would not inhabit prairie habitats. Photo by Brooke Alexander.

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December 17, 2019

Cunila origanoides 2, American Dittany, Howard County, MD, Helen Lowe Metzman

A native plant associated with dry rocky areas...usually intermixed with woodlands. As a mint it probably is a reasonable bee plant as an obscure, small plant it probably hasn't been looked at that much. Classic native mint used in all sorts of teas and infusions. Photo and specimen by Helen Low Metzman, Howard County, MD. Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D,

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December 17, 2019

Asarum canadense, Wild Ginger, Howard County, Md,

Asarum canadense - Wild Ginger. The deep purple/maroon on this bulky little flower tells you that it aims to attract beetles and flies rather than bees. Check out the fine textures to the flower body. To what evolutionary end to the small projects and long white hairs make? Picture and specimen by Helen Lowe Metzman. Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene

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December 17, 2019

Lonchopria similis, m, side, chile

A cactus specialist, if you look closely you can see the spiny little cactus pollen balls all over this male, if you look even more closely at the shot of the face you will see a a lawn croquet hoop formation formed by the mandibles in the center of the face...used to grasp the female at her waist during mating. Captured by Laurence Packer in the coastal deserts of Chile

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December 17, 2019

Andrena uvulariae, F, face,

Andrena uvulariae, Female, Recently, this species was known only from the type, but work by Mike Arduser, Joan Milam, and John Ascher have resulted locating additional specimens along the the male. It appears to be a pollen specialist on Bellflowers. This specimen is approximately 100 years old from the Smithsonian collection.

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December 17, 2019

Lasioglossum halophitum, F, face, Florida, St. Johns County

Captured as part of a Global Climate Change investigation in National Park Dune systems, yet another tricky Dialictus is photographed here. As the name suggests it is a lover of salt, in this case, salt marshes.. Photograph taken by Kamren Jefferson, bee captured in Timucuan Ecological & Historic Preserve

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December 17, 2019

Bombus citrinus, f, face, Talbot Co, MD

Not all bumblebees gather pollen. Some, like this Bombus citrinus, take over the nests of other bumblebee species and use their workers to provision the nests of their young. This is the most common Eastern species of parasitic bumblebee, and it is actually often difficult to find these days, Something we are watching to see if there might be issues with the species

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December 17, 2019

Houstonia caerulaea, 2, Common Bluets, Howard County, Md,

Bluets, or Quaker Ladies. Their delicate loveliness does not quite shouw up in these pictures...forming little clumps in poor soils and a part of spring I wait for each year. Specimen and photos from Helen Low Metzman. Photography Information: Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens, Twin Macro Flash in Styrofoam Cooler, F5.0

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December 17, 2019

Colletes validus, f, back, Providence Co., RI

A blueberry specialist. Look how long that face is...The space between the mandible and the eye is what bee heads often use to separate species. This Colletes validus has a huggggggeeee malar space...other Colletes species essentially have none, the mandible being directly at the base of the eye. Why? Likely because the only flower this species regularly visits for

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December 17, 2019

Anthophora plumipes, M, Head, N.A

Male, Anthophora plumipes, introduced into Maryland from Japan in the 1980s...and now common in the DC region. Likely to be split from A. plumipes back to an earlier synonym A. pilipes due to recent molecular work