Wildlife Program

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We provide rigorous and unbiased information on migratory birds, terrestrial and marine mammals, amphibians and reptiles, terrestrial plants, threatened and endangered species, wildlife disease, and on wildlife issues resulting from human activities. Our science contributes toward a more complete understanding of the Nation’s ecosystems and landscapes.

EMA Animal Welfare Assurance Website

An ARMI of Many

An ARMI of Many

The USGS Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) provides critical information about amphibian populations and life history traits, environmental characteristics, and potential causes of decline.

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Wildlife Health

Wildlife Health

The National Wildlife Health Center is an international leader in the timely and accurate diagnosis of wildlife illness and mortality critical to achieving effective disease control and prevention.

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Research Highlights

Our research is focused on the study of wildlife populations, their habitats, and the factors that influence their health.

Renewable Energy: Wind & Solar

Wildlife Disease

Pollinators

Whooping Cranes

Desert Tortoise

News

Date published: June 22, 2020

It’s Pollinator Week!

Pollinators in the form of bees, birds, butterflies, bats and beetles provide vital but often invisible services, from supporting terrestrial wildlife and plant communities, to supporting healthy watersheds.

Date published: May 6, 2020

ARMI Scientist Michael Adams Receives 2020 PARC Honor

Dr. Michael Adams, Lead for the USGS Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative (ARMI) and Supervisory Research Ecologist at the USGS Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center, has been selected to receive the 2020 Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (PARC) Alison Haskell Award for Excellence in Herpetofaunal Conservation...

Date published: June 12, 2019

Research Spotlight: Ducklings Leave Nests in Early Morning, Suggesting Predator Avoidance

In a study published in the journal Ecology and Evolution, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) biologists put small cameras next to duck nests to determine what time of day wild ducklings began hatching, when the hen and ducklings departed the nest, and if any predators came to the nest when ducklings were present.

Publications

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Year Published: 2020

Ecological forecasting—21st century science for 21st century management

Natural resource managers are coping with rapid changes in both environmental conditions and ecosystems. Enabled by recent advances in data collection and assimilation, short-term ecological forecasting may be a powerful tool to help resource managers anticipate impending near-term changes in ecosystem conditions or dynamics. Managers may use the...

Bradford, John B.; Weltzin, Jake F.; Mccormick, Molly; Baron, Jill; Bowen, Zack; Bristol, Sky; Carlisle, Daren; Crimmins, Theresa; Cross, Paul; DeVivo, Joe; Dietze, Mike; Freeman, Mary; Goldberg, Jason; Hooten, Mevin; Hsu, Leslie; Jenni, Karen; Keisman, Jennifer; Kennen, Jonathan; Lee, Kathy; Lesmes, David; Loftin, Keith; Miller, Brian W.; Murdoch, Peter; Newman, Jana; Prentice, Karen L.; Rangwala, Imtiaz; Read, Jordan; Sieracki, Jennifer; Sofaer, Helen; Thur, Steve; Toevs, Gordon; Werner, Francisco; White, C. LeAnn; White, Timothy; Wiltermuth, Mark
Bradford, J.B., Weltzin, J.F., McCormick, M., Baron, J., Bowen, Z., Bristol, S., Carlisle, D., Crimmins, T., Cross, P., DeVivo, J., Dietze, M., Freeman, M., Goldberg, J., Hooten, M., Hsu, L., Jenni, K., Keisman, J., Kennen, J., Lee, K., Lesmes, D., Loftin, K., Miller, B.W., Murdoch, P., Newman, J., Prentice, K.L., Rangwala, I., Read, J., Sieracki, J., Sofaer, H., Thur, S., Toevs, G., Werner, F., White, C.L., White, T., and Wiltermuth, M., 2020, Ecological forecasting—21st century science for 21st century management: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2020–1073, 54 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20201073.

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Year Published: 2020

Short-term forecasts of insect phenology inform pest management

Insect pests cost billions of dollars per year globally, negatively impacting food crops and infrastructure, and contributing to the spread of disease. Timely information regarding developmental stages of pests can facilitate early detection and control, increasing efficiency and effectiveness. In 2018, the U.S. National Phenology Network (USA-NPN...

Crimmins, Theresa M.; Gerst, Katharine L.; Huerta, Diego; Marsh, R. Lee; Posthumus, Erin E.; Rosemartin, Alyssa H.; Switzer, Jeff R.; Weltzin, Jake F.; Coop, Len; Dietschler, Nicholas; Herms, Daniel A.; Limbu, Samita; Trotter III, R. Talbot; Whitmore, Mark
Attribution: Wildlife Program

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Year Published: 2019

Effects of experimental removal of Barred Owls on population Demography of Northern Spotted Owls in Washington and Oregon—2018 Progress Report

Populations of Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina; herineafter referred to as Spotted Owl) have declined throughout the subspecies’ geographic range. Evidence indicates that competition with invading Barred Owls (S. varia) has contributed significantly to those declines. A pilot study in California showed that removal of Barred Owls...

Wiens, J. David; Dugger, Katie M.; Lesmeister, Damon B.; Dilione, Krista E.; Simon, David C.
Wiens, J.D., Dugger, K.M., Lesmeister, D.B., Dilione, K.E., and Simon, D.C., 2019, Effects of Barred Owl (Strix varia) removal on population demography of Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) in Washington and Oregon, 2015–18: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2019-1074, 17 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20191074.