How many Burmese pythons inhabit southern Florida?

Tens of thousands of invasive Burmese pythons are estimated to be present in the Everglades.

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Captured Burmese python
April 6, 2016

Captured Burmese python

Captured Burmese python

Image: Tracking Device in Burmese Python
March 14, 2016

Tracking Device in Burmese Python

Team of scientists working together to insert a tracking device in a 14 foot Burmese python.

February 26, 2016

Ecology of and Control Strategies for Invasive Burmese Pythons (Python molurus bivitattus) in the Greater Everglades

Ecology of and Control Strategies for Invasive Burmese Pythons (Python molurus bivitattus) in the Greater Everglades

Image: Close-Up of a Radio Transmitter on an Invasive Burmese Python
April 23, 2012

Close-Up of a Radio Transmitter on an Invasive Burmese Python

This close-up is of the radio-transmitter on a 16 1/2-foot python. The snake, being removed from the wild by USGS and NPS personnel, was re-captured in a thicket in Everglades National Park in April 2012. After its first capture, the snake was equipped with a radio-transmitter and an accelerometer as part of one of the Burmese python projects led by USGS to learn more

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Image: A Record-Breaking Invasive Burmese Python
April 1, 2012

A Record-Breaking Invasive Burmese Python

This female Burmese python broke the records for her length - 17 feet, 7 inches - and the number of eggs she contained: 87. She was first captured in Everglades National Park by USGS researchers in the spring of 2012, when they followed a "Judas snake" - a male python with a transmitter - and found her nearby in the bushes. USGS scientists then outfitted her with two radio

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Image: A Record-Breaking Invasive Burmese Python
April 1, 2012

A Record-Breaking Invasive Burmese Python

This female Burmese python broke the records for her length - 17 feet, 7 inches - and the number of eggs she contained: 87. She was first captured in Everglades National Park by USGS researchers in the spring of 2012, when they followed a "Judas snake" - a male python with a transmitter - and found her nearby in the bushes. USGS scientists then outfitted her with two radio

...
Image: A Record-Breaking Invasive Burmese Python
April 1, 2012

A Record-Breaking Invasive Burmese Python

This female Burmese python broke the records for her length - 17 feet, 7 inches - and the number of eggs she contained: 87. She was first captured in Everglades National Park by USGS researchers in the spring of 2012, when they followed a "Judas snake" - a male python with a transmitter - and found her nearby in the bushes. USGS scientists then outfitted her with two radio

...
Image: A Record-Breaking Invasive Burmese Python
March 6, 2012

A Record-Breaking Invasive Burmese Python

This female Burmese python broke the records for her length -- 17 feet, 7 inches – and the number of eggs she contained: 87. She was first captured in Everglades National Park by USGS researchers in the spring of 2012, when they followed a "Judas snake" -- a male python with a transmitter -- and found her nearby in the bushes. This picture is from the day of her initial

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Image: Burmese Python Swimming in Florida Bay
November 16, 2011

Burmese Python Swimming in Florida Bay

Fishing guide Camp Walker, Catalyst Charters, of Islamorada, Fla.,  took this photo of a Burmese python swimming in Florida Bay from the end of Twisty Channel toward End Key on Nov. 16, 2011. 

video thumbnail: Constrictor Snakes (B-roll)
October 1, 2009

Constrictor Snakes (B-roll)

Video footage (B-roll) of Everglades National Park biologists hunting and capturing a Burmese Python in Florida.

Image: A Burmese Python and an Alligator Encounter in South Florida

A Burmese Python and an Alligator Encounter in South Florida

A Burmese python (Python molurus) peeks over the head of an alligator that holds the python's body in its mouth in Everglades National Park. Photo courtesy of Lori Oberhofer, National Park Service.

Image: Implanting a Radio Transmitter in a Burmese Python

Implanting a Radio Transmitter in a Burmese Python

Researchers implant a radio transmitter in a 16-foot, 155-pound female Burmese python (Python molurus) at the South Florida Research Center, Everglades National Park. Radio-tracking builds understanding of where pythons spend their time and therefore where they can be controlled in practice. Photo courtesy of Lori Oberhofer, National Park Service.