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Volcano Science Center

Find U.S. Volcano

The Volcano Science Center is the primary center serving the mission of the USGS Volcano Hazards Program — to enhance public safety and minimize social and economic disruption from volcanic unrest and eruption. The center is home to the five US volcano observatories with offices in Anchorage, Alaska; Menlo Park and Mountain View, California; Vancouver, Washington; and Hilo, Hawaii.

News

Is Yellowstone overrated? As a disaster movie subject, maybe…

Is Yellowstone overrated? As a disaster movie subject, maybe…

Photo and Video Chronology — Annual Mauna Loa GPS campaign underway

Photo and Video Chronology — Annual Mauna Loa GPS campaign underway

Volcano Watch — A fresh look at Kīlauea’s 1924 explosive deposits

Volcano Watch — A fresh look at Kīlauea’s 1924 explosive deposits

Publications

To mix or not to mix: Details of magma storage, recharge, and remobilization during the Pacheco stage at Misti Volcano, Peru (≤21–2 ka)

We investigate ten of the most recent tephra-fall deposits emplaced between ≤21–2 ka from the Pacheco stage of Misti volcano, Peru, to elucidate magma dynamics and explosive eruption triggers related to magma storage, recharge, and remobilization. Whole-rock, glass, and mineral textures and compositions indicate the presence of broadly felsic, intermediate, and mafic magmas in a chemically and the
Authors
Marie K. Takach, Frank J. III Tepley, Christopher Harpel, Rigoberto Aguilar, Marco Rivera

Automatic identification and quantification of volcanic hotspots in Alaska using HotLINK: The hotspot learning and identification network

An increase in volcanic thermal emissions can indicate subsurface and surface processes that precede, or coincide with, volcanic eruptions. Space-borne infrared sensors can detect hotspots—defined here as localized volcanic thermal emissions—in near-real-time. However, automatic hotspot detection systems are needed to efficiently analyze the large quantities of data produced. While hotspots have b
Authors
Pablo Saunders-Shultz, Taryn Lopez, Hannah R. Dietterich, Tarsilo Girona

Craters of habit: Patterns of deformation in the western Galápagos

The western Galápagos islands of Fernandina and Isabela comprise six active volcanoes that have deformed since first observed by satellite radar in the early 1990s. We analyse new (2015–2022) displacement time series at Alcedo, Cerro Azul, Darwin, Fernandina, Sierra Negra, and Wolf volcanoes in the context of deformation and unrest since 1992. Previous discussions of volcano deformation have focu
Authors
Eoin Reddin, Susanna K. Ebmeier, Marco Bagnardi, Andrew F. Bell, Pedro Espín Bedón

Science

Mining and mineralization of the Clear Lake region

The Geysers-Clear Lake area has been one of the most productive in the United States for mercury, and gold was mined in the late 1800s. Many of the deposits are directly associated with outcrops of early Clear Lake volcanic rocks.
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Mining and mineralization of the Clear Lake region

The Geysers-Clear Lake area has been one of the most productive in the United States for mercury, and gold was mined in the late 1800s. Many of the deposits are directly associated with outcrops of early Clear Lake volcanic rocks.
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Geology and History of Black Rock Desert Volcanic Field

Black Rock Desert volcanic field is the northernmost volcanic field in a belt of young volcanic fields beginning in the northern Grand Canyon of Arizona and continuing in a north-trending line through Utah. Part of the eastern Basin and Range Province, the Black Rock Desert volcanic field covers nearly 7,000 km2 (2,700 mi) and is 145 km (90 mi) long.
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Geology and History of Black Rock Desert Volcanic Field

Black Rock Desert volcanic field is the northernmost volcanic field in a belt of young volcanic fields beginning in the northern Grand Canyon of Arizona and continuing in a north-trending line through Utah. Part of the eastern Basin and Range Province, the Black Rock Desert volcanic field covers nearly 7,000 km2 (2,700 mi) and is 145 km (90 mi) long.
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Gas monitoring at Clear Lake Volcanic Field

The USGS periodically analyzes volcanic gases and hot springs at Clear Lake volcanic field during ground-based campaigns.
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Gas monitoring at Clear Lake Volcanic Field

The USGS periodically analyzes volcanic gases and hot springs at Clear Lake volcanic field during ground-based campaigns.
Learn More