Topobathymetric Elevation Model of Majuro Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands

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With an estimated elevation of only 3-meters above sea level, the Majuro Atoll, capital of the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI), is extremely vulnerable to sea-level rise, tsunamis, storm surge, and coastal flooding that could impact the sustainability of the infrastructure, groundwater, and ecosystems. Located in the northern tropical Pacific Ocean, the waters surrounding the Majuro Atoll land areas are relatively shallow with poorly mapped bathymetry.
 

To support the modeling of storm- and tide-induced flooding, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal National Elevation Database (CoNED) Applications Project in collaboration with the U. S. Department of Interior (DOI) Pacific Islands Climate Science Center (PI-CSC) and the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) developed an integrated 1-meter topobathymetric digital elevation model (TBDEM) for the Majuro Atoll, RMI, using a combination of nine best available multi-source topographic and bathymetric data for the Majuro Atoll onshore and offshore:

 

 

 

This research effort was a collaboration with DOI PI-CSCUSGS CMGPUniversity of GuamUniversity of Hawaii at MânoaNOAA/National Geodetic SurveyMarshall Islands Conservation Society, RMI Office of Lands and Survey, and RMI Environmental Protection Authority.

 

For additional information or to download the Majuro Atoll topobathymetric elevation model, visit USGS ScienceBase at https://doi.org/10.5066/F7416VXX.

 

This video is of is a three-dimensional (3D) view of the Majuro Atoll, Republic of the Marshall Islands topobathymetric model which consists of topography (land elevation) and bathymetry (water depth). This video shows the importance of high-resolution, detailed topobathymetric models because the highest natural elevation for the Majuro Atoll is only three meters. This video shows how the island nation is extremely vulnerable to sea-level rise, king tides, and flooding.

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS Center) in collaboration with the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program and the Department of Interior Pacific Islands Climate Science Center developed this topobathymetric model and published the data and metadata on this USGS ScienceBase website

Dean Tyler, USGS EROS Center

(Public domain.)