The amount and location of SO2 emissions on Kīlauea has changed ove...

The amount and location of SO2 emissions on Kīlauea has changed ove...

Detailed Description

Air pollution, caused mainly by SO2 emitted from K?lauea, became a frequent problem on the Island of Hawai'i in 1986. Until that time, the volcano's ongoing East Rift Zone eruption, which began in 1983, consisted of brief, but spectacular, episodes of high lava fountains about once every 3 weeks. This intermittent timing allowed the wind to clear the air between eruptive episodes. In mid-1986, the style of the eruption changed from episodic fountains to a constant, but relatively quiet, effusion of lava and gas emissions. People in areas downwind of the volcano began reporting a wide range of problems, including reduced visibility, health issues, and damage to crops. The word "vog," a blend of the words volcanic and smog, was coined to identify this form of air pollution. In 2008, a second eruption began at the summit of K?lauea, and the amount of SO2 released from the volcano became several times higher than the pre-2008 levels. While vog had been a part of everyday life for people on the Island of Hawai'i for many years, the summit eruption increased the scope of the problem substantially.

Details

Image Dimensions: 498 x 1005

Source:


USGS